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Unit 10 PowerPoint Presentation for World History II

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1 Unit 10 PowerPoint Presentation: World War II / Cold War Click next to or below image for information

Hitler in opposition:

30 | 2 Hitler in opposition Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) returns the salute of his Brown Shirts in this photograph from the third party day rally in Nuremberg in 1927. The Brown Shirts formed a private army within the Nazi movement, and their uniforms, marches, salutes, and vandalism helped keep Hitler in the public eye in the 1920s. (Courtesy, Bison Books, London) Hitler in opposition Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: The Growth of Nazi Germany:

30 | 3 Map: The Growth of Nazi Germany The Growth of Nazi Germany Until March 1939, Hitler brought ethnic Germans into the Nazi state; then he turned on the Slavic peoples he had always hated. He stripped Czechoslovakia of its independence and prepared for an attack on Poland in September 1939. (Copyright (c) Houghton Mifflin Company. All Rights Reserved.) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Still of Nuremburg:

30 | 4 Still of Nuremburg This still is from an extraordinary illustration of the Nazi period: Triumph of the Will, a documentary film on the sixth Nazi Party rally, which took place September 4-10, 1934, in the historic city of Nuremberg. Directed by a talented young woman, Leni Riefenstahl (1902-2003), Triumph of the Will has long been recognized as one of the most compelling propaganda films ever made. (Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive) Still of Nuremburg Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Mussolini:

30 | 5 Mussol i ni In this photo, Benito Mussolini--the founder of fascism--is shown with other fascist leaders in 1922, as he becomes prime minister of Italy. Standing at Mussolini's right (with beard) is Italo Belbo, later a pioneering aviator and fascist Italy's air force minister. (Corbis) Mussolini Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Stalin and workers march to victory:

30 | 6 Stalin and workers march to victory Stalin rarely appeared in public, but posters singing his praises were everywhere. Here the mighty ruler is almost one of the boys, as he and Soviet workers march to victory. "Our program is realistic," Stalin proclaims on the poster, "because it is you and me working together." (David King Collection) Stalin and workers march to victory Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Forced labor camp:

30 | 7 Forced labor camp This rare photo from about 1933 shows the reality of deported peasants and other political prisoners building the Stalin-White Sea Canal in far northern Russia, with their bare hands and under the most dehumanizing conditions. In books and plays Stalin's followers praised the project as a model for the regeneration of "reactionaries" and "kulak exploiters" through the joys of socialist work. (David King Collection) Forced labor camp Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

"No pasaran" poster, Spanish Civil War:

30 | 8 "No pasaran" poster, Spanish Civil War "No pasaran!" (They shall not pass)," proclaimed the charismatic Spanish communist Dolores Ibarruri (1895-1989), whose impassioned speeches and radio broadcasts helped inspire the heroic defense of Madrid during the civil war that gripped Spain during the later 1930s. This poster depicts Spanish soldiers defending the democratic republic against the antidemocratic nationalists seeking to overthrow it. (Biblioteca Nacional Madrid) "No pasaran" poster, Spanish Civil War Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Germany absorbs Austria:

30 | 9 Germany absorbs Austria With the defeat and dismemberment of the Habsburg Empire, Austria was left a small, landlocked country after World War I. Most Austrians would have welcomed unification with Germany, but the peacemakers specifically prohibited any such step. As it happened, Austria was unified with Germany on Hitler's terms with the Anschluss of March 1938. Here Austrians look on as German troops march into Salzburg. (Hulton Archives/Getty Images) Germany absorbs Austria Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: World War II in Europe:

30 | 10 Map: World War II in Europe World War II in Europe This map shows the extent of Hitler's empire at its height, before the Battle of Stalingrad in late 1942 and the subsequent advances of the Allies until Germany surrendered on May 7, 1945. (Copyright (c) Houghton Mifflin Company. All Rights Reserved.) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: World War II in the Pacific:

30 | 11 Map: World War II in the Pacific World War II in the Pacific Japanese forces overran an enormous amount of territory in 1942, which the Allies slowly recaptured in a long, bitter struggle. As this map shows, Japan still held a large Asian empire in August 1945, when the unprecedented devastation of atomic warfare suddenly forced it to surrender. (Copyright (c) Houghton Mifflin Company. All Rights Reserved.) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Milkman in London:

30 | 12 Milkman in London Adolf Hitler believed that his relentless terror bombing of London--the "blitz"--could break the will of the British people in 1940. He was wrong. The blitz caused enormous destruction, but Londoners went about their business with courage and calm determination, as this unforgettable image of a milkman in the rubble suggests. (Corbis) Milkman in London Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Families marched out of Warsaw Ghetto:

30 | 13 Families marched out of Warsaw Ghetto This photo captures the terrible inhumanity of Nazi racism. German soldiers are forcing frightened and bewildered families from their homes in the soon-to-be-destroyed Warsaw Ghetto, in Poland, for deportation to concentration camps. There they face murder in the gas chambers. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Families marched out of Warsaw Ghetto Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

"This is Nazi brutality":

30 | 14 "This is Nazi brutality" Ben Shahn (1898-1969) is recognized as a master of social realist art. Born in Lithuania, he lived in America most of his life. He was employed in the Office of War Information, but only two of his designs were used. Lidice, in Central Bohemia, was destroyed on June 10, 1942, as a reprisal for the assassination of a German gauleiter (provincial governor). It has been rebuilt as a memorial. The visual force of Shahn's poster depends partly on the disturbing image of a hooded figure but also on the angularity of the background and the impersonality of the strips of ticker tape. (Courtesy of the Trustees of the Imperial War Museum) "This is Nazi brutality" Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

German Dive-Bombers over Poland:

30 | 15 German Dive-Bombers over Poland This German painting depicts a German ME-100 fighter plane attacking a Soviet troops convoy on the Eastern Front. (akg-images) German Dive-Bombers over Poland Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Stalingrad, November 1942:

30 | 16 Stalingrad, November 1942 From September 1942 until the German surrender early in February 1943, Stalingrad, on the Volga River, saw some of the heaviest fighting of World War II. The Soviet victory, in the face of incredible casualties, was arguably the turning point in the war in Europe. (Sovfoto/Eastfoto) Stalingrad, November 1942 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

"For the Motherland's Sake, Go Forward":

30 | 17 "For the Motherland's Sake, Go Forward" Joining the historic Russian warrior and the young Soviet soldier in the common cause, this poster--For the Motherland's Sake, Go Forward, Heroes--portrays the defense of the nation as a sacred mission and illustrates the way Soviet leaders successfully appealed to Russian nationalism during the war. (Library of Congress) "For the Motherland's Sake, Go Forward" Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

D-Day 1944:

30 | 18 D-Day 1944 During the Normandy Invasions at Omaha Beach, June 6, 1944, airborne paratroopers landed behind German coastal fortifications around midnight, and American and British forces hit several beaches at daybreak as Allied ships and bombers provided cover. American troops secured full control of Omaha Beach by nightfall, but at a price of 3,000 casualties. Allied air power prevented the Germans from bringing up reserves and counterattacking. (National Archives) D-Day 1944 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Big Three at Yalta:

31 | 19 Big Three at Yalta With victory over Nazi Germany assured, the leaders of the Soviet Union, Britain, and the United States (Stalin, Winston Churchill, and Franklin D. Roosevelt) were in reasonable spirits (though Roosevelt was ailing) when they met at Yalta, a Black Sea resort in the Soviet Union, in February 1945. Important sources of friction among them were evident at the meeting, but the differences that led to the Cold War did not seem paramount at this point. The Yalta conference proved to be the last meeting of the three leaders. (F.D.R. Library) Big Three at Yalta Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Female guards remove bodies:

30 | 20 Female guards remove bodies When Allied forces entered Germany in 1945, they found not only camp guards and their prisoners but also enormous numbers of corpses. This photograph shows female guards at Bergen-Belsen, one of the most infamous concentration camps, dumping the bodies of Holocaust victims into a mass grave. (Wide World Photos) Female guards remove bodies Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Atomic bombing of Nagasaki, 1945:

30 | 21 Atomic bombing of Nagasaki, 1945 When this photo of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki was taken on August 9, 1945, from an observation plane 6 miles up, 35,000 people on the ground had died. (Courtesy of the Trustees of the Imperial War Museum) Atomic bombing of Nagasaki, 1945 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Hungarian Revolution, 1956:

31 | 22 Hungarian Revolution, 1956 By mid-1956 the Hungarian Imre Nagy (1896-1958) had taken advantage of the liberalizing atmosphere to begin dismantling collective farms and to move toward a multi-party political system in Hungary. The Soviets used tanks to crush the Hungarian reform movement. Thousands of Hungarians were killed during the fighting or subsequently executed, and 200,000 Hungarians fled to the west. Here we see members of the insurrection destroying Soviet propaganda material and portraits of Stalin, in Koeztarsasag Square, Budapest. (Erich Lessing/Magnum Photos) Hungarian Revolution, 1956 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: Europe After the Second World War:

30 | 23 Map: Europe After the Second World War Europe After the Second World War Millions of refugees fled westward because of war and territorial changes. The Soviet Union and Poland took land from Germany, which the Allies partitioned into occupation zones. Those zones subsequently formed the basis of the East and West German states, as the iron curtain fell to divide both Germany and Europe. Austria was detached from Germany, but the Soviets subsequently permitted Austria to reunify as a neutral state. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

PowerPoint Presentation:

30 | 24 Berlin Air Lift

Map: Cold War Confrontation:

30 | 25 Map: Cold War Confrontation Cold War Europe Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Ban the Bomb:

30 | 26 Ban the Bomb As nuclear tension escalated during the 1950s, some built air-raid shelters; others took to the streets in antinuclear protests. The Ban-the-Bomb movement was especially prominent in Britain, where the noted philosopher Bertrand Russell (1877-1970) played a central role. Here, seated at right, he awaits arrest during a sit-in demonstration outside the British Defense Ministry. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Ban the Bomb Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Hungarian Revolution, 1956:

30 | 27 Hungarian Revolution, 1956 By mid-1956 the Hungarian Imre Nagy (1896-1958) had taken advantage of the liberalizing atmosphere to begin dismantling collective farms and to move toward a multi-party political system in Hungary. The Soviets used tanks to crush the Hungarian reform movement. Thousands of Hungarians were killed during the fighting or subsequently executed, and 200,000 Hungarians fled to the west. Here we see members of the insurrection destroying Soviet propaganda material and portraits of Stalin, in Koeztarsasag Square, Budapest. (Erich Lessing/Magnum Photos) Hungarian Revolution, 1956 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Cold War confrontation, 1959:

30 | 28 Cold War confrontation, 1959 U.S. vice president Richard M. Nixon and Soviet premier Nikita Khrushshev had a heated exchange of views during Nixon's visit to a Moscow trade fair in 1959. Two years earlier, the Soviet Union had launched the world's first space satellite. (Seymour Raskin/Magnum Photos) Cold War confrontation, 1959 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Cuban missile crisis:

30 | 29 Cuban m i ssile crisis The October 29 meeting of the "ExComm," or Executive Committee (the only meeting to be photographed). To President Kennedy's immediate right is Secretary of State Dean Rusk; to his left (in front of the Presidential Seal on the wall) is Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara. Presidential adviser Theodore Sorensen (on near side, third from right), later wrote: "I saw first-hand how brutally physical and mental fatigue can numb the good sense as well as the senses of normally articulate men." (Kennedy Library) Cuban missile crisis Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Vietnamese at war:

30 | 30 Vietnamese at war President John F. Kennedy (r. 1961-1963) feared that a communist victory of the North Vietnamese Viet Cong against the noncommunist government of South Vietnam would encourage communist movements throughout Southeast Asia and alter the Cold War balance of power. After his assassination, his successor, Lyndon Johnson, gained support from Congress for unlimited expansion of U.S. military deployment. Americans and South Vietnamese troops burned many villages (as we see in this photo) to deprive the enemy of civilian refuges. This policy undermined support for the South Vietnamese government in the countryside. Nothing the Americans tried succeeded in stopping the Viet Cong guerrillas and their North Vietnamese allies. (Dana Stone/stockphoto.com) Vietnamese at war Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Antiwar rally:

30 | 31 Antiwar rally Divisions over the Vietnam War ran deep in the United States. Antiwar protesters captured the public's attention, but anti-Vietcong demonstrations like this one spoke for many Americans. Opinion polls showed that fewer than 20 percent of Americans supported withdrawal from Vietnam until after the November 1968 elections, by which time the decision to get out had been made. (Burt Glinn/Magnum Photos) Antiwar rally Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Soviets in Czechoslovakia:

30 | 32 Soviets in Czechoslovakia Soviet leaders moved tanks into Prague in August 1968 and ended the widely admired reform movement taking place in Czechoslovakia. Though there were protests, as shown here on August 20, the outcome was a foregone conclusion once the Soviets decided to intervene. Although life soon returned to "normal" in the Czechoslovak capital, the ending of the Prague Spring proved a watershed for the fate of communism in Europe. (Josef Kondelka/Magnum Photos) Soviets in Czechoslovakia Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Lech Walesa:

30 | 33 Lech Walesa An inspiration for fellow workers at the Lenin Shipyards in the dramatic and successful strike against the Communist bosses in August 1980, Lech Walesa (a feisty Lenin Shipyards electrician and devout Catholic) played a key role in Solidarity before and after it was outlawed. Speaking here to old comrades at the Lenin Shipyards after Solidarity was again legalized in 1988, Walesa personified an enduring opposition to Communist rule in eastern Europe. (G. Merrillon/Gamma) Lech Walesa Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Fall of Berlin Wall:

30 | 34 Fall of Berlin Wall Erected in 1961 to stop emigration from communist East Germany to the West , the Berlin Wall had become an all-too-tangible symbol of the division of Europe, and much of the world, for more than four decades after World War II. In 1989, when the communist regime in East Germany collapsed, the East German government opened the wall on November 9th. In this photo we see East Germans (backs to camera) streaming through the dismantled Berlin Wall into West Berlin. (Wide World Photos) Fall of Berlin Wall Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Celebrating victory:

30 | 35 Celebrating victory A Russian soldier flashes the victory sign in front of the Russian parliament on August, 1991, as the last-gasp coup attempt of Communist hard-liners is defeated by Boris Yeltsin and an enthusiastic public. The soldier has cut the hammer and sickle out of the Soviet flag, consigning those famous symbols of proletarian revolution to what Trotsky once called the "garbage can of history." (Filip Horvat/Corbis Saba) Celebrating victory Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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