Unit6_PowerPoints

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

Unit 6 PowerPoint Presentation for World History II

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

1 Unit 6 PowerPoint Presentation: Industrial Revolution Nationalism Click next to or below image for information.

Model of Hargreaves' spinning jenny:

2 Model of Hargreaves' spinning jenny A gifted carpenter and jack-of-all-trades, James Hargreaves invented his cotton-spinning jenny about 1765. It was simple and inexpensive; it was also hand-operated. The loose cotton strands on the slanted bobbins passed up to the sliding carriage and then on to the spindles in back for fine spinning. The worker, almost always a woman, regulated the sliding carriage with one hand, and with the other she turned the crank on the wheel to supply power. By 1783 one woman could spin by hand a hundred threads at a time on an improved model. (Science Museum, London/Michael Holford) Model of Hargreaves' spinning jenny Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Watt steam engine:

3 Watt steam engine In the early 1760s, a gifted young Scot named James Watt (1736-1819) was called on to repair a Newcomen engine being used in a physics course. He saw that this engine's waste of energy could be reduced by adding a separate condenser. Watt went into partnership with a wealthy English toymaker who provided the risk capital and manufacturing plant. Twenty years of constant effort and the help of skilled mechanics enabled Watt to create an effective vacuum and regulate a complex engine. (Science Museum, London) Watt steam engine Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Nat-Y-Glo Iron Works, Wales:

4 Nat-Y-Glo Iron Works, Wales This watercolor painting by George Robertson depicts the Nat-Y-Glo (Natyglo) Iron Works, Collieries, and Mine Works, in the parish of Aberystwith, South Wales, belonging to Messrs. J. & C. Bailey. This mining operation figures in the Royal Commission Reports of 1842 on the Employment (and Treatment) of Children and Young Persons in the Iron Works of South Wales. (National Museums & Galleries, Wales) Nat-Y-Glo Iron Works, Wales Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Borsig Ironworks, Germany:

5 Borsig Ironworks, Germany August Borsig, an artisan, founded the Borsig Ironworks in Berlin in the 1840s. The factory expanded to meet the needs of the burgeoning German rail system. By the time of Borsig's death in 1854, his factory had built 500 locomotives. (Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz) Borsig Ironworks, Germany Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Dore, Overcrowded London:

6 Dore, Overcrowded London This engraving by the French artist Gustave Dore (1832-83, the most popular and successful French book illustrator of the mid-nineteenth century) depicts the overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in industrial London in the nineteenth century. Because municipal authorities were unable to cope with the rapid pace of urbanization, the working class was forced to live in dwellings such as these row houses that did not have adequate sanitation or recreational facilities. (Courtesy, Dover Publications) Dore, Overcrowded London Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Engraving, textile factory:

7 Engraving, textile factory This engraving from Frances Trollope's nineteenth-century novel Michael Armstrong, Factory Boy depicts the hardship of the times. Here a boy is tearfully leaving his family to work in a textile mill. (British Library) Engraving, textile factory Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Girl dragging coal wagon in mine:

8 Girl dragging coal wagon in mine This engraving of a girl dragging a coal wagon in the mines was one of several that accompanied a parliamentary report on working conditions in the mines. They shocked public opinion and contributed to the Mines Act of 1842. (British Library) Girl dragging coal wagon in mine Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Marx:

9 Marx This sepia photograph depicts Karl Marx (1818-1883) in a dignified and confident pose. Interpreting history in economic terms, Marx predicted that socialism would replace capitalism. In his Communist Manifesto (which he published with Friedrich Engels) he called for the proletariat to overthrow capitalism and to establish a classless society. (Corbis) Marx Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: Industrial Revolution in England, ca. 1850:

10 Map: Industrial Revolution in England, ca. 1850 Industrial Revolution in Britain, ca. 1850 Industry concentrated in the rapidly growing cities of the north and the Midlands, where rich coal and iron deposits were in close proximity. (Copyright (c) Houghton Mifflin Company. All Rights Reserved.) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: Continental European Industrialization, ca. 1850:

11 Map: Continental European Industrialization, ca. 1850 Continental European Industrialization, ca. 1850 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Wilhelm proclaimed Emperor:

12 Wilhelm proclaimed Emperor The ultimate blow to French pride and the culmination of the German nationalist movement was the proclamation of the German Empire in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles on January 18, 1871. This painting by the German painter Anton von Werner (1843-1915) depicts William I presiding over the creation of the Second Reich, while Otto von Bismarck, the nation builder, and the military theoretician Helmuth von Moltke stand at his feet. (Bismarck Museum/akg-images) Wilhelm proclaimed Emperor Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Garibaldi leading "Red Shirts":

13 Garibaldi leading "Red Shirts" The revolutionary Italian firebrand Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) set sail for Sicily in May 1860, with but a thousand poorly armed, red-shirted followers, to help the island overthrow its Bourbon ruler. This painting shows Garibaldi leading his "Red Shirts" to victory over the Neapolitan Army. Garibaldi's successful conquests in the south and Count Camillo di Cavour's in the north opened the way for Italian unification. (Scala/Art Resource, NY) Garibaldi leading "Red Shirts" Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Garibaldi and Victor Emmanuel:

14 Garibaldi and Victor Emmanuel Garibaldi and Victor Emmanuel For centuries many Italians had dreamed of national unity, but the reality was not achieved until 1861. This painting/fresco by Cesare Maccari (1840-1919) depicts the historic meeting between the successful military leader of the unification drive, Giuseppe Garibaldi, and the king of Sardinia, Victor Emmanuel, at the Bridge of Teano in the fall of 1860. This meeting sealed the unification of northern and southern Italy. With only the sleeve of his red shirt showing, Garibaldi offers his hand--and his conquests--to the uniformed king and his modern monarchical government. (Scala/Art Resource, NY) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: The Unification of Italy, 1859-1870:

15 Map: The Unification of Italy, 1859-1870 The Unification of Italy, 1859-1870 The leadership of Sardinia-Piedmont and nationalist fervor were decisive factors in the unification of Italy. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: The Unification of Germany, 1866-1871:

16 Map: The Unification of Germany, 1866-1871 The Unification of Germany, 1866-1871 This map deserves careful study. Note how Prussian expansion, Austrian expulsion from the old German Confederation, and the creation of a new German Empire went hand in hand. Austria lost no territory, but Prussia's neighbors in the north suffered grievously or simply disappeared. The annexation of Alsace-Lorraine turned France into a lasting enemy of Germany before 1914. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

authorStream Live Help