Unit3_Cold War_PPP

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Cold War:

Cold War America After World War II

Churchill and Truman, "Iron Curtain Speech," March 5, 1946:

Churchill and Truman, "Iron Curtain Speech," March 5, 1946 On March 5, 1946, former British prime minister Winston S. Churchill (1874–1965) delivered a speech, which he intended for a worldwide audience, at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. President Harry S. Truman (right) had encouraged Churchill (seated) to speak on two themes: the need to block Soviet expansion and the need to form the Anglo-American partnership. Always eloquent and provocative, Churchill denounced the Soviets for drawing an "iron curtain" across eastern Europe. This speech became one of the landmark statements of the Cold War. (Harry S. Truman Library) Churchill and Truman, "Iron Curtain Speech," March 5, 1946 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Map: Cold War Germany:

Map: Cold War Germany Cold War Germany This map shows how Germany and Berlin were divided into occupation zones. Meant as temporary divisions, they became permanent, transformed by the Cold War into East and West Germany. In 1948, with the Berlin airlift, and again in 1961, with the erection of the Berlin Wall, Berlin became the flash point of the Cold War. With the end of the Cold War, the division of Germany also ended. In 1989, the Berlin Wall was torn down, and in 1990 the two Germanies were re-unified. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Berlin Air Lift--German children watching American planes bring food, 1948:

Berlin Air Lift--German children watching American planes bring food, 1948 German children watching an American plane in "Operation Vittles" bring food and supplies to their beleaguered city. The airlift kept a city of 2 million people alive for nearly a year and made West Berlin a symbol of the West's resolve to contain the spread of Soviet communism. ((c) Bettmann/Corbis) Berlin Air Lift--German children watching American planes bring food, 1948 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Marshall Plan poster of ship:

Marshall Plan poster of ship The goal of the Marshall Plan was to provide American economic support for the rebuilding of Europe's economy. By the time the plan ended, the United States had provided over $12.5 billion dollars to those European nations participating in the European Recovery Program. This poster demonstrated that with cooperation, Europe would soon be moving forward again. (Courtesy of George C. Marshall Foundation) Marshall Plan poster of ship Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Communist hysteria in the media: Red Menace poster:

Communist hysteria in the media: Red Menace poster Although Hollywood generally avoided overtly political films, it released a few dozen explicitly anticommunist films in the postwar era. Depicting American communists as vicious hypocrites, if not hardened criminals, Hollywood's Cold War movies, like its blacklist, were an effort to protect its imperiled public image after HUAC's widely publicized investigation of the movie industry. (The Michael Barson Collection/Past Perfect) Communist hysteria in the media: Red Menace poster Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Soldiers of 11th Airborne Division watch atomic bomb explosion, 1951 tests in Nevada:

Soldiers of 11th Airborne Division watch atomic bomb explosion, 1951 tests in Nevada Soldiers of the 11th Airborne Division watch as an atomic explosion mushrooms into the sky during 1951 testing maneuvers in Nevada. ((c) Bettmann/Corbis) Soldiers of 11th Airborne Division watch atomic bomb explosion, 1951 tests in Nevada Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Girl in front of dome atomic bomb shelter:

Girl in front of dome atomic bomb shelter As the Cold War intensified and the Soviets became a nuclear power, the government began to consider methods to survive a nuclear war. One "solution" was to encourage people to build backyard bomb shelters. Pictured here is one family's atomic bomb shelter that slept six. The cost was $1,250 in 1951. (Corbis-Bettmann) Girl in front of dome atomic bomb shelter Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Couple looking at house:

Couple looking at house In postwar America, millions of families shopped for new houses in the country's burgeoning suburbs. In the first decade after the Second World War, 4.3 million veterans used GI Bill loan provisions to purchase single-family residences. Many of these men and women were members of what Tom Brokaw, NBC's news anchor, has called "the greatest generation." They survived the Great Depression, served in the war, and became parents of America's baby boomers. (H. Armstrong Roberts) Couple looking at house Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Truman with "Dewey Defeats Truman" headlines, 1948:

Truman with "Dewey Defeats Truman" headlines, 1948 So few pollsters predicted that President Harry S. Truman (1884–1972) would win the 1948 presidential election that the Chicago Tribune announced his defeat before all the returns were in. Here a victorious Truman pokes fun at the newspaper for its premature headline. (Corbis-Bettmann) Truman with "Dewey Defeats Truman" headlines, 1948 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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