Physical Effects of Smoking (Session 3)

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Session 3 Physical Effects of Quitting Smoking:

C larke & Company Benefits LLC Session 3 Physical Effects of Quitting Smoking

PowerPoint Presentation:

5 Short Term Effects 4 Effects of Smoking Outline 3 Smoking Related Deaths 6 Long Term Effects 7 Physical Effects on Others 8 Next Week’s Assignment 1 Last Week’s Assignment 2 Statistics

Last Week’s Assignment:

Last Week’s Assignment 1

Smoking Statistics:

2 Smoking Statistics

Smoking Statistics:

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease, disability, and death In the United States. Between 1964 and 2004, cigarette smoking caused an estimated 12 million deaths , including 4.1 million deaths from cancer, and 5.5 million deaths from cardiovascular diseases. Smoking Statistics

Smoking Related Deaths:

3 Smoking Related Deaths About Nicotine

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Smoking Related Deaths The Surgeon General has reported that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mainly bronchitis, pneumonia, and emphysema, resulted in up to 118,000 deaths annually in the USA, 90% of which were attributable to smoking. Almost 35% of smoking related deaths are due to diseases of the arteries and heart.

Effects of Smoking:

Effects of Smoking 4

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When smoking tobacco, the user inhales tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and 200 known poisons into the lungs. The nicotine in cigarettes is powerfully addictive. Some of the chemicals that are found in cigarettes are used as fuel solvents, embalming fluids, nail polish remover, rat poison, and gas chamber poison. Chemicals in Cigarettes

Fertility :

Men who smoke may suffer impotence due to damage to the blood vessels in the penis. Sperm quality and density can also be affected by smoking. Smokers may produce less sperm and their sperm may have more abnormalities. Women who smoke take longer to conceive and are more likely to have a miscarriage. Fertility

Appearance:

The New Scientist has reported that a study at Nagoya City University in Japan has found that smoking leads to an increase in an enzyme that breaks down skin , and also a reduction of up to 40% in the production of the collagen needed to renew skin. Skin starved of oxygen due to smoking becomes dry and grey. Wrinkles around the eyes and mouth develop much earlier and the tar stains your teeth and fingernails. Appearance

Physical Effects:

Exercise – Smoking makes it harder to exercise and reduces the benefits of exercise to your body. Sickness – Smokers have more coughs and colds than non-smokers and take longer to feel well again. Sleep – Smoking can cause disturbed sleep patterns over time. Chronic Illness – Smoking leads to the development of many chronic diseases like cancer, coronary heart disease, pulmonary disease, and many more. Physical Effects

Short Term Effects of Quitting:

5 Short Term Effects of Quitting

20 minutes – Blood pressure and pulse return to normal. 8 hours – Oxygen levels return to normal. Nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in blood reduce by half. :

Short Term Effects of Quitting 20 minutes – Blood pressure and pulse return to normal. 8 hours – Oxygen levels return to normal. Nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in blood reduce by half.

12 hours – Carbon monoxide levels in blood drop to normal. 24 hours – Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body. Lungs start to clear out mucous and other smoking debris. :

Short Term Effects of Quitting 12 hours – Carbon monoxide levels in blood drop to normal. 24 hours – Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body. Lungs start to clear out mucous and other smoking debris.

48 hours – There is no nicotine left in the body. Ability to taste and smell is greatly improved. 72 hours – Breathing becomes easier. Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase. :

Short Term Effects of Quitting 48 hours – There is no nicotine left in the body. Ability to taste and smell is greatly improved. 72 hours – Breathing becomes easier. Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase.

2 to12 weeks – Circulation improves. Lungs function increases. 3 to 9 months – Coughs, wheezing, and breathing problems improve as lung functions are increased by up to 10%.:

Short Term Effects of Quitting 2 to12 weeks – Circulation improves. Lungs function increases. 3 to 9 months – Coughs, wheezing, and breathing problems improve as lung functions are increased by up to 10%.

Long Term Effects of Quitting:

6 Long Term Effects of Quitting Health Concerns for you and for those around you.

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12 Months (1) – Excess risk of coronary heart disease is reduced by about half and declines gradually hereafter. (2) – A smoker has 2 – 4 times the chance of developing chronic heart disease than a non-smoker.

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Coronary Artery Disease. Smoking cessation reduces the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). A study in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated that the risk of developing coronary artery disease could be reduced by one-half after one year of abstinence from smoking. After two years, the risk of CAD equals that of people who have never smoked.

Lung Disease:

Lung Disease The Lung Health Study, a project supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, showed that smoking cessation results in a significant reduction in the prevalence of cough, sputum production, wheezing, and shortness of breath in individuals with COPD. The beneficial effects in the reduction of the prevalence of chronic cough from smoking cessation occur within the first year of stopping smoking.

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Risk of heart attack falls to about half that of a smoker. In the previously mentioned study from the New England Journal of Medicine, among men you have quit smoking for at least 5 years, mortality from CAD decreases to almost the level of subjects who have never smoked. In the Nurses’ Health Study, subjects who smoked in the past had a 24% reduction in cardiovascular disease mortality after two years of smoking cessation. The Framingham Study, involving both men and women, suggests that most of the benefit of quitting occurs within 5 years following cessation. 5 years… ….. …..

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Risk of stroke returns to the level of people who have never smoked. Smoking cessation reduces the risk of stroke. The Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in Washington, DC asserts that smoking cessation reduces the risk of both stroke and brain hemorrhage. 5 years… ….. …..

10 years:

10 years Risk of lung cancer falls to about half that of a smoker. After 10 to 14 years of smoking cessation, the adverse effects on mortality from coronary artery disease resolve completely. The benefits of cessation on hip fractures occur about ten or more years following cessation and are partly smoking cessation. Hip fractures contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in the elderly.

Risk of lung cancer is reduced to close to that observed in nonsmokers. Risk of coronary heart disease falls to the same as someone who has never smoked. :

15 years Risk of lung cancer is reduced to close to that observed in nonsmokers. Risk of coronary heart disease falls to the same as someone who has never smoked.

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Stroke According to the Nurses’ Health Study, the risk of suffering a stroke among female cigarette smokers decline soon after cessation, and the benefits are independent of the age at starting and the number of cigarettes smoked per day.

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Smoking cessation decreases the risk of hip fracture. A study done at Harvard University and supported by the National Institute of Health demonstrated that there is a 17% increased risk of hip fracture in smokers compared with non-smokers at 60 years of age. Smoking cessation leads to a decline in this risk. Hip Fracture

Physical Effects on Others:

Physical Effects on Others Children & Secondhand Smoke Effects 7

Low Birth-Weight Babies :

Low Birth-Weight Babies Smoking cessation reduces the risk of giving birth to low birth-weight babies. The Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion asserts that women who stop smoking prior to starting their second trimester of pregnancy reduce their risk of having a low birth-weight baby to that of nonsmoking women. The carbon monoxide in a two pack a day habit restricts the oxygen supply to developing fetus by 60%. This results in stunted growth and lack of development, and can even cause premature births and still born children. Quit smoking if you are pregnant.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Babies born to mothers who smoked in pregnancy are more likely to be premature, stillborn or die shortly after birth. A baby exposed to tobacco smoke has a higher risk of dying from cot death. Children whose parents smoke are more likely to get pneumonia and bronchitis in their first year of life, to suffer from more frequent and more severe asthma attacks and to become regular smokers themselves. QUIT SMOKING FOR YOUR KIDS. Children of Smokers

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Smoking & Your Pets Breathing problems in dogs and asthmatic-like symptoms in cats. Salivation Diarrhea Vomiting Cardiac abnormalities Respiratory difficulties and respiratory paralysis Feline lymphoma in cats Lung cancer in dogs Nasal cancer in dogs Death: From 1-5 cigarettes and from 1/3-1 cigar can be fatal if ingested.

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Smoking & Your Pets A study, carried out by vets in the United States, reached the conclusion that cats whose owners smoked were prone to feline lymphoma, a form of cancer that kills 3 out of 4 cats within a year of its diagnosis. Researchers have established that development of canine asthma, nasal, and lung cancer may be prompted by exposure to secondhand smoke. Quite smoking for your pets.

Secondhand Smoke:

Secondhand Smoke Secondhand smoke has over 250 chemicals that are known to be harmful: For example: hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, and ammonia. Each year, exposure to ETS (Environmental Tobacco Smoke) causes an estimated 3,000 non-smoking Americans to die of lung cancer and causes up to 300,000 children to suffer from lower respiratory-tract infections. Quit smoking for those around you.

Third-Hand Smoke:

Third-Hand Smoke Residual nicotine and other chemicals left on variety of indoor surfaces by tobacco smoke. Studies show that third-hand smoke clings to hair, skin, clothes, furniture, drapes, walls, bedding, carpets, dust, vehicles, and other surfaces, even long after smoking has stopped. Infants, children and nonsmoking adults may be at risk of tobacco-related health problems when they inhale, ingest, or touch substances containing third-had smoke. Third-had smoke is a relatively new concept, and researchers are still studying its possible dangers.

If you have quit smoking before age 50, you have halved the risk of dying in the next 15 years compared with continuing smokers. Life expectancy among smokers who quit at age 35 years, exceeds that of continuing smokers by 6.9 to 8.5 years for men and 6.1 to 7.7 years for women. Smokers who quit at younger ages realize greater life extensions. :

Life Expectancy If you have quit smoking before age 50, you have halved the risk of dying in the next 15 years compared with continuing smokers. Life expectancy among smokers who quit at age 35 years, exceeds that of continuing smokers by 6.9 to 8.5 years for men and 6.1 to 7.7 years for women. Smokers who quit at younger ages realize greater life extensions.

Life expectancy among smokers who quit at age 45 years surpasses that of those who continue to smoke by 5.6 to 7.1 years for men and 5.6 to 7.2 years for women. Among 55 year-olds whom quit smoking, men experience a 3.4 to 4.8 year increase, and women, a 4.2 to 5.6 year increase in life expectancy in comparison to those who continue to smoke. Even those who quit much later in life gain some benefits: among smokers who quit at age 65 years, men gain 1.4 to 2.0 years of life, and women gain 2.7 to 3.7 years. :

Life Expectancy Life expectancy among smokers who quit at age 45 years surpasses that of those who continue to smoke by 5.6 to 7.1 years for men and 5.6 to 7.2 years for women. Among 55 year-olds whom quit smoking, men experience a 3.4 to 4.8 year increase, and women, a 4.2 to 5.6 year increase in life expectancy in comparison to those who continue to smoke. Even those who quit much later in life gain some benefits: among smokers who quit at age 65 years, men gain 1.4 to 2.0 years of life, and women gain 2.7 to 3.7 years.

Confidence:

Stopping smoking is a challenge. Once you have quit, you will know you can succeed at difficult tasks and take more control of your life. Quitting helps you believe in yourself. Quit for you. Confidence

Resources:

Resources www.abovetheinfluence.com http://www.quit-smoking-stop.com http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0246.pdf http://stopsmokingonlinetoday.com/quit/effects-of-smoking/ Shot Term Effects of Quitting http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/third-hand-smoke/AN01985

Assignment for Next Time:

Assignment for Next Time Write down a list of high-risk places you’ll want to avoid that may trigger you to smoke or be tempted to smoke. Share this list with your family and friends Locate a local support group or online support group that you can easily access to keep up with your goals.

We will be discussing what to expect out of the quitting process, setting goals, and expectations of quitting. :

We will be discussing what to expect out of the quitting process, setting goals, and expectations of quitting. Next Group Session