UNDERGROUNDRAILROADINFO

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

Travel as a slave on the Underground Railroad Learn vital information about the Underground Railroad

PowerPoint Presentation:

And now, you will take a trip back in time during the age of slavery…

PowerPoint Presentation:

You are a slave. Your body, your time, your very breath belong to a farmer in 1850s Maryland. Six long days a week you tend his fields and make him rich. You have never tasted freedom. You never expect to. And yet . . . your soul lights up when you hear whispers of attempted escape. Freedom means a hard, dangerous trek.

PowerPoint Presentation:

A strong, lucky runaway might have made it to freedom in two months. For others, especially in bad weather, the trek might have lasted a year.

PowerPoint Presentation:

You’ve heard the stories about her. She is Harriet Tubman, a former slave who ran away from a nearby plantation in 1849 but returns to rescue others. Guided by her “visions,” she has never lost a passenger. Even if Moses can’t fit you into her next group, she’ll tell you how to follow the North Star to freedom in Canada.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Your head says go, your feet say no. Harriet Tubman told you that a lantern on a hitching post means a safe house. But can you really knock on a white family’s door and trust them to help you?

PowerPoint Presentation:

A warm welcome and hot food—that’s what you find inside the house. Guided by their conscience, the owners break the law by helping runaways. Yet terror still haunts you. As you fall asleep you hear bloodhounds not far away. They are looking for fugitives, looking for you. Freedom is still a long way off.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Weeks of trudging, including a grueling passage of almost 250 miles (402 kilometers) through the Appalachian Mountains, have brought you to Rochester. Perhaps you’ll catch a glimpse of fugitive Frederick Douglass , the fiery orator who publishes the North Star, an abolitionist paper. You meet with another noted citizen, activist Susan B. Anthony . She and her antislavery friends give you warm clothing for the hard Canadian climate and make sure you’re taken safely to Lake Erie.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Across Lake Erie lies Canada—and freedom. A few weeks earlier you might have coaxed an easy ride from a sympathetic ferry captain. But as winter takes hold, chunks of ice have begun to form. You might find someone to row you across, or you could try leaping from one ice floe to another. Either way, you’ll be freezing cold. Yet staying exposes you—and your helpers—to slave hunters. Do you try going across?

PowerPoint Presentation:

You made it! It took courage, luck, help, and incredible stamina. Here in Canada, you can finally breathe free. Not only won’t the government return you to slavery in the United States, but you can vote and even own land. No wonder thousands have already run away to settle here. You still face challenges : finding a home, making a living, adjusting to a new place. But you face them in freedom.

PowerPoint Presentation:

In this part, you will learn vital information about the Underground Railroad. Answer the questions on your worksheet as you explore the Underground Railroad in depth.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Underground Railroad was not underground. Because escaping slaves and the people who helped them were technically breaking the law, they had to stay out of sight. They went “underground” in terms of concealing their actions. Sometimes they even hid in unusual places.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Many clever and creative ideas helped slaves during their escape. When abolitionist John Fairfield needed to sneak 28 slaves over the roads near Cincinnati, he hired a hearse and disguised the group as a funeral procession.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fugitives hid in the secret compartment of the cupboard in this Gettysburg, Pennsylvania house.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Henry “Box” Brown, a slave, had himself shipped from Richmond to Philadelphia in a wooden Box.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Her most famous work was Uncle Tom's Cabin, which she wrote in 1850. The book opened up the realities of slavery to the entire world. It became a best seller which has never been out of print.

PowerPoint Presentation:

One day while he was out with his father chopping wood by the side of a road, a group of slaves, handcuffed and chained together, passed by on their way to be sold in Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana. Questioned by the young boy's father about why they were chained, one of the men sadly replied: "They have taken us away from our wives and children, and they chain us lest we should make our escape and go back to them." After the dejected company had left the scene, the youth wondered to himself how he would feel if his father were taken away from him.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The incident by the side of the road marked the first awakening of Levi Coffin's sympathy with the oppressed, which, he observed in his memoirs, together with a strong hatred of oppression and injustice in any form, "were the motives that influenced my whole after-life." Coffin, who moved to the Indiana town of Newport (Fountain City today) in 1826 and became an important merchant there, acted on his beliefs. From his simple eight-room house in Wayne County, and with the help of his devoted wife, Catharine, he managed over the next twenty years to offer a safe haven to thousands of African Americans fleeing slavery's evils on the "Underground Railroad" along major escape routes leading from Cincinnati, Madison, and Jeffersonville.

PowerPoint Presentation:

"Seldom a week passed," said Coffin, "without our receiving passengers by this mysterious road. We found it necessary to be always prepared to receive such company and properly care for them." Coffin's efforts won for him the designation "President of the Underground Railroad" and for the Coffins' home the title "Grand Central Station" on the path for slaves eventual freedom in the north and Canada. One of the refugees who found shelter in the Coffins' home was later immortalized as the character Eliza, the heroine of Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin. Levi and Catharine Coffin are supposedly depicted in the book as Simeon and Rachel Halliday.

PowerPoint Presentation:

1793—Fugitive Slave Act: Look up the word impede in the dictionary. Now, in your own words, how impede is used in the following sentence. The United States outlaws any efforts to impede the capture of runaway slaves. 1794—Cotton Gin: Look up the word demand in the dictionary. Now, in your own words, how demand is used in the following sentence. Eli Whitney patents his device for pulling seeds from cotton. The invention turns cotton into the cash crop of the American South—and creates a huge demand for slave labor.

PowerPoint Presentation:

1849—Harriet Tubman Escapes Look up the word flee in the dictionary. Now, in your own words, how is flee used in the following sentence. After fleeing slavery, Tubman returns south at least 15 times to help rescue several hundred others. 1852— Uncle Tom’s Cabin Published Look up the word publication in the dictionary. Now, in your own words, how is publication used in the following sentence. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel about the horrors of slavery sells 300,000 copies within a year of publication.

authorStream Live Help