Darwin_Lian_June2011 - A case for Pedagogy

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My Contribution Dr. Ania Lian Member of the Editorial Board Rangsit Journal of Arts and Sciences Rangsit University, Pathumthani , Bangkok, TH New Futures and Challenges in Research and Teaching at the School of Education

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A case for the relevance of pedagogy

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Introduction – Good pedagogy Languages and Culture Community engagement and Indigenous cultures Online teaching Accreditation and quality Information Literacy (critical literacy skills) Mentoring Research (CDU & Rangsit University, BKK) Summary Slides 5 – 8 Slides 9 – 19 Slides 21 - 22 Slides 23 – 29 Slides 30 – 34 Slides 35 – 44 Slide 45 Slides 45 - 48 List of Contents

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An unprecedented rate of change An unprecedented richness of information The universe is “interdisciplinary by nature” The central importance of research Willingness to look elsewhere ... A need for creativity and divergence More power to the students Rhizomatic models of learning Context – Universities as leaders? (life-long skills) (wide access) (not organised in our boxes) (do-it-yourself) (openness to new) (drivers of progress) (relevance) (vs. linear and progressive)

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Good pedagogy

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In 1968, Gearge Land (George Land & Beth Jarman , 1992) gave 1,600 five-year-olds a creativity test to see how highly creative they scored. This was the same test used by NASA to select innovative engineers and scientists. He re-tested the same children when they were of 10 years of age (1978), and again at 15 years of age (1983). He later tested 280,000 adults to see how highly creative they scored. The test results were: Creativity Study

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“Loss of creativity is learnt”

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Good pedagogy Learner–centred: (supportive environment, relevant tasks and creative activities) Meaningful, Engaging, Enabling expansion, Equitable, Flexible , Interactive. Critical thinking skills (Information literacy) (expansive, “deep knowledge”) Developing professional expertise The capacity to identify the need for more information, engaging strategies leading to identifying problems and to problem-solving Recognising the cultural basis of knowledge. Respecting differences and engaging seemingly incommensurable forms of knowledge. Communication (& collaboration) skills (connectedness) The capacity to work with others: present information, share information, select appropriate avenues for so doing, facilitate collaborative work methods, establish professional networks. Technology skills The capacity to use, work with, select and learn about relevant technologies.

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What strategies did we put in place in order to ensure that the following happened? Learner–centred: (supportive, relevant and creative) Meaningful, Engaged, Enabling expansion, Equitable, Flexible , Interactive. Critical thinking skills (Information literacy) (expansive, “deep knowledge”) Developing professional expertise The capacity to identify need for more information and engage strategies leading to identifying problems and problem-solving Recognising the cultural basis of knowledge. Respecting differences and engaging seemingly incommensurable forms of knowledge. Communication (& collaboration) skills (connectedness) The capacity to work with others: present information, share information, select appropriate avenues for so doing, facilitate collaborative work methods, establish professional networks Technology skills The capacity to use, work with, select and learn about relevant technologies. Evaluation criteria

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Critical Pedagogy and Research – LOTE, TESOL and ESL Teachers

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Conventional Model of Pedagogy and Research Teachers Civilising the student

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Critical Pedagogy and Research Teachers Dialogic model of inquiry in L2-pedagogy

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Professional development 2010 – Mandarin https://sites.google.com/site/lotechinese/

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Professional development 2010 – For Mandarin teachers https://sites.google.com/site/nihaohigh/home/chinese-culture-vocabulary Site I created to inspire Mandarin teachers to create their own class websites

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Professional development 2010 – For Mandarin teachers A website of an imaginary student of Mandarin I created this site to demonstrate the ease of such projects https://sites.google.com/site/tamaranihaohigh/

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Professional development 2010 – For Mandarin teachers I created this presentation to exemplify how teachers can work with authentic resources in more than one way. Here students recreate an ancient Chinese tale using PowerPoint. The idea was for teachers to assist students with their Mandarin skills. When well designed, teachers can teach students how to work in groups (not straightforward). Students also learn creativity and ICT skills. URL: http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/lian.ania-380495-cn-pots-entertainment-ppt-powerpoint/

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Professional development 2010 – For Mandarin teachers I made up this song to show teachers that using simple tunes has a place in a language classroom  The idea was for teachers to create such songs in Mandarin. To view this presentation, click on the link: URL: http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/lian.ania-583184-tow-pots-song-of-ania/

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What strategies did we put in place in order to ensure that the following happened? Learner–centred: (supportive, relevant and creative) Students engage in cross-cultural experiences, expand the focus of their activities by expanding the elements on which they build. Creating their own websites helps transform their engagement into creative projects, to be published and shared. The project gives focus to their learning, they draw on varied resources, teacher and peer support. Critical thinking skills (Information literacy) (expansive, deep knowledge) Explore the viability of their ideas, define the project scope and its core elements, engage solutions best suiting the task demands. Recognising the cultural basis of knowledge. Respecting differences and engaging seemingly incommensurable forms of knowledge. Communication & collaboration skills (connectedness) Individual and group work, construct and present information, share information, select appropriate media and texts for so doing, identify & use relevant networks. Technology skills Learn to use, work with, select and learn about relevant technologies. Evaluation criteria

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Cooperation with schools E.g. With pre-service teachers or in the context of PD, developing resources supporting the teaching of languages and “intercultural awareness”. Setting up long-term relationships with schools Establishing professional websites by pre-service teachers for Indigenous languages , LOTE and ESL. These sites create professional nodes of life-long learning and networking. They contain resources, teaching examples and more. My Contribution to LOTE, TESOL, ESL & Culture

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Community engagement and Indigenous cultures

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Issues Working as part of the Reference Group (APO NT) and engaging in a whole community and a whole government approach to support local communities, Indigenous cultures and create relevant support mechanisms Establishing a regional website linking universities and other organisations Education : 20-40 year olds in need of Adult Education programs Creating learning centres (self-access centres with a tutor in place) – Arnhem region is well supported with fibre -optic cables, so is the line between Darwin and Alice Springs Local communities needing websites and simple, online broadcasting systems Aboriginal Interpreters Services – Need for training and assistance Community engagement and Indigenous cultures Aboriginal Peak Organisations of the NT The Central Land Council (CLC), Northern Land Council (NLC), North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency (NAAJA), Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service (CAALAS) and the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the NT (AMSANT). Remote Service Delivery Communities (15) and the “growth towns’ (additional ) In order to improve the Service Delivery, liaising with the APO will help establish local implementation plans (allocating responsibilities to relevant parties)

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Online Learning – Examples Online Learning – Using digital tools to enhance the learning experience

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http://cel.curtin.edu.au/casestudies/eScholar.cfm#cathycupitt Physics: Forum participation. Methodology: One enthusiastic student started the discussion and then others followed. At the end, all students reached the same conclusion. Objective: Expose students to different technologies (applications) to encourage life-long learning. Pedagogy: (HOW?) Reliance on initiators. Creativity: The relevance of the application to students’ learning was decided /identified by the teacher. The outcome of all students reaching the same answer is not supported as evidence for assuring quality learning. Life-long learning: Did these discussions serve to build a community of knowledge or were they simply an exercise in “playing the teacher’s game”? On-line learning strategies

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What strategies did we put in place in order to ensure that the following happened? Evaluation criteria Learner–centred: (supportive environment, relevant tasks and creativity) Meaningful, Engaging, Enabling expansion, Equitable, Flexible , Interactive. Critical thinking skills (Information literacy) (expansive, “deep knowledge”) Developing professional expertise The capacity to identify the need for more information and engage strategies leading to identifying problems and problem-solving Recognising the cultural basis of knowledge. Respecting differences and engaging seemingly incommensurable forms of knowledge. Communication (& collaboration) skills (connectedness) The capacity to work with others: present information, share information, select appropriate avenues for so doing, facilitate collaborative work methods, establish professional networks. Technology skills The capacity to use, work with, select and learn about relevant technologies.

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Unit: Teaching communication skills: Reflection on learning. Methodology: Students to create audio / video reflections. Very few students took up the option. Those who engaged were ”excellent” e.g. “I thought I could do it, I was really hoping for a good outcome”… Objective : For students to learn about their own learning strategies and, as a result, engage in their process of expertise development . ALSO, to develop peer networks. Comment – Better if mandatory. This will help create “the vibrant community” Pedagogy : Unguided story-telling Creativity : The reflection -task did not engage students’ experiences in a forward-looking manner. How then is the experience to serve future learning? Life-long learning: Did the exercice engage students in reflecting on their learning process or was that simply an exercice in “playing the teacher’s game”? On-line learning strategies http://cel.curtin.edu.au/casestudies/eScholar.cfm#cathycupitt

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What strategies did we put in place in order to ensure that the following happened? Evaluation criteria Learner–centred: (supportive environment, relevant tasks and creativity) Meaningful, Engaging, Enabling expansion, Equitable, Flexible , Interactive. Critical thinking skills (expansive, “deep knowledge”) Developing professional expertise The capacity to identify need for more information and engage strategies leading to identifying problems and problem-solving Recognising the cultural basis of knowledge. Respecting differences and engaging seemingly incommensurable forms of knowledge. Communication (& collaboration) skills (connectedness) The capacity to work with others: present information, share information, select appropriate avenues for so doing, facilitate collaborative work methods, establish professional networks. Technology skills The capacity to use, work with, select and learn about relevant technologies.

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Online Learning – Pedagogy Online Learning – Using digital tools to enhance the learning experience ENGAGE Students

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Online Learning Online Learning – Using digital tools to enhance the learning experience

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Graduate attributes – Accreditation and quality

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Graduate attributes

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Graduate attributes Critical thinking involves applying logical and rational processes to analyse the components of an issue . Think creatively to generate innovative solutions. Curtin University of Technology Critical thinking involves engaging students in strategies enabling them to expand the conceptual bases in terms of which they (a) frame issues and (b) evaluate their explanatory potential . Ania Lian

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Graduate attributes Critical thinking involves applying logical and rational processes to analyse the components of an issue . Think creatively to generate innovative solutions. Critical thinking involves engaging students in strategies enabling them to expand the conceptual bases in terms of which they (a) frame issues and (b) evaluate their explanatory potential . Year 1 - Identify & logically structure problems based on material provided Year 2 - Self determine different types of problems i.e. financial vs. non financial, group vs. individual problem dimensions. Research beyond material provided Year 3- Critically respond to a problem and reinforce earlier developments . Level 1 - Differentiate between explanatory frameworks in terms of (a) the concepts that frame them and (b) the questions which they sought to address. Level 2 - Expanding explanatory frameworks by engaging questions capable of bringing new perspectives on the relevant concepts. Level 3 - Developing innovative proposals that derive from internally consistent and well-informed perspectives. Addressing tensions in the specific area of inquiry.

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Graduate attributes Critical thinking involves engaging students in strategies enabling them to expand the conceptual bases in terms of which they (a) frame issues and (b) evaluate their explanatory potential . Level 1 - Objective Differentiate between explanatory frameworks in terms of the concepts that frame them and the questions which they sought to address. Level 2 - Objective Expanding explanatory frameworks by engaging questions capable of bringing new perspectives on the relevant concepts. Assessment Identify the key concepts which form the structure of your project and the questions which informed their development. . Assessment Identify questions (ideas or experiments) that introduce new perspectives that help expand the explanatory scope of the concepts of the approach adopted in your project. Demonstrate their expansive potential in relation to the ideas developed and implemented in your project. Level 3 - Objective Developing innovative environments that build on strategies that derive from internally consistent and well-informed perspectives. Addressing tensions in the specific area of inquiry. Assessment – Construct an environment that builds on strategies that derive from internally consistent and well-informed perspectives . Illustrate its expansive qualities in relation to tensions that it helps to resolve in the area of your inquiry. Develop criteria that will allow you evaluate the potential of your model.

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Critical Literacy Project - 2011 In this project I offer an innovative approach to teaching Information Literacy and critical thinking skills Ania Lian

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Critical Literacy Project - B ackground Click HERE to watch the presentation ONLINE URL: http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/lian.ania-832594-ania-lian-critical/

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Critical Thinking and Information Literacy Higher-order thinking requires students to manipulate information and ideas in ways that transform their meaning and implications (DET, Qld ) . self-evaluation driven community building collaborative online environment Students indicated that while the resources helped them distinguish between good and bad writing , they did not necessarily enable novice writers to produce work to the standard they recognized as desirable. “marked improvement in student writing that did not relate to the marking criteria actually given” Background

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Online Learning Online Learning – Using digital tools to enhance the learning experience

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The Critical Literacy model for collaborative learning - Pedagogy The model is designed to assist students in developing their information management and critical thinking skills . These skills involve the capacity to identify and work with a wide variety of information sources to expand knowledge, collaborate, construct new understandings, ask informed questions, discuss ideas and sharpen critical thinking. The model offers a set of generic prompts (STEPS) which take students, step-by-step, through the information management process. With the focus on information management , the STEPS engage students in critically evaluating their information management skills (resources and argumentation). In this focus on self-evaluation as a learning tool , the model assists students by engaging their own critical judgment for identifying the points of breakdown in the ways in which they work with information. In other words, these points of breakdown are not explained to the students by the tutor. Instead, the model prompts students to examine the consistency of their own thought and, in so doing, to evaluate their work on their own terms.

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Information Literacy Model – Process Frameworks are formed by key concepts defined in relation to the questions that frame their explanatory scope Tensions arise when approaches take different perspectives on the same concept. An analysis should reflect the limiting or expansive results of these differences.

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In this assignment I will identify factors that will help me discuss the traditions and lifestyles of the pre-colonial Indigenous People of Australia with respect to their relevance to the today's Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The question of the relevance of the traditional Aboriginal lifestyles is embedded in the widely accepted understanding that when cultures clash, this not only brings benefits, but also, often, may lead to displacing of cultures and therefore the people practising particular ways of living. While this assignment will not exhaust the above problematic, I hope to identify some issues which will help me understand better the kinds of problems that were brought about by the contact between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. ------------------------ Upon review of selected documents, films, documentaries and my own experiences, the following questions emerged as relevant to an inquiry discussing the value of the traditions and lifestyles of the Indigenous people to today’s Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians: How do the Indigenous people perceive and value their traditions and values? …. 2. How do the non-Indigenous people perceive and relate to the Indigenous traditions and values? …. Information Literacy – Clemente 2011

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Information Literacy Model – Framework Focus – e.g. By what strategies is this key concept addressed? Focus – e.g. By what strategies is this key concept addressed? Focus – e.g. By what strategies is this key concept addressed? Tensions? Tensions? Tensions? Scope of inquiry: I ssues of concern

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Information Literacy Model – Outcomes What issues need resolving? Summary

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Critical Literacy Project 2011 - Website https://sites.google.com/site/clementecanberra

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Member of the Editorial Board Rangsit Journal of Arts and Sciences Rangsit University, Pathumthani , Bangkok, TH Currently discussing mentoring arrangements with Rangsit Reviewed research papers for international conferences (IADIS EL 2010 and 2011) Invited to review all research papers in technology and language learning at the national conference of Applied Linguistics, 2011, ANU, Canberra Supervised and co-supervised research degrees since 1993 Mentoring Research

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Language, cognition and education Studies have shown that changing how people talk changes how they think. Teaching people new color words, for instance, changes their ability to discriminate colors. And teaching people a new way of talking about time gives them a new way of thinking about it. The categories and distinctions that exist in particular languages are meddling in our mental lives very broadly.

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School kills creativity – Ken Robinson Engaging in these kinds of reflection enables academics to ponder over the kinds of contributions that the academy can make to society as a whole (cf. Barrie, 2004: 262). Barrie S. (2004). A research-based approach to generic graduate attributes policy. Higher Education Research and Development , 23 (3), 261-275 .

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Thank you.