Making Sense of Generators

Views:
 
Category: Others/ Misc
     
 

Presentation Description

Understanding how generators work involves understanding a about electricity. It can all get a bit confusing. So, if you’re finding it hard choosing between the IG2000H and the IG1000P, or you don’t even know what this means, you’re in need of a lesson.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Making Sense of Generators:

Making Sense of Generators http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

Slide 2:

If you’re thinking of buying a generator, then it’s important to understand about them so you can ensure that you buy the correct unit. Understanding how generators work involves understanding a about electricity. It can all get a bit confusing. So, if you’re finding it hard choosing between the IG2000H and the IG1000P, or you don’t even know what this means, you’re in need of a lesson. Here, we’re going to explain the basics about generators and how they work. Once you’ve finished reading, you should know a bit more about generators. http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

Slide 3:

Voltage In the UK, our domestic power supply is set at 240 volts. This is a measure of the pressure of the electricity. You can think about this in the same way that you think about water coming out of the tap. It’s a measure of the force that the water is coming out at. In terms of electricity, 240 volts is the force of electricity that will come out of our plugs. 240 volts is a nice and safe pressure. It helps to keep us safe from electrocution and fires.   If you’re buying a generator, you need to buy one that's rated at either 240, 230 or 115/230 and 120/240. This will ensure that your generator is compatible with the appliances that you’re using.   This is true in the UK, voltage may vary across the world. For instance, the USA uses a 120-volt system and ramps up the power and France uses a 230-volt system. http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

Slide 4:

http://www.kiporuk.co.uk Wattage Wattage is the most important consideration when buying a generator. It is a rating of how much power it can put out. So, if volts is the pressure the electricity comes out at, and amps is the amount of electricity that comes out (we didn’t discuss this above, but this is the case) then wattage is the combination of both of those things and a power rating.   You need to choose a generator that can provide you with the required wattage for your application. Here’s an example:

Slide 5:

Imagine you need a generator for your boat. You want to run: A fridge – needs to be on all the time. Uses 80watts An oven – only needs to be on some of the time: Uses 400watts A microwave – only needs to be on some of the time : Uses 850watts A TV – only needs to be on some of the time: Uses 150 watts You need a generator that can provide 1480 watts (you will use the microwave & oven at the same time, ok). You should also factor in 10%, so you need one that can provide ~1600 watts. You also need one that can cope with the initial power required to run the microwave. Some appliances (including microwaves, kettles, and some power tools) have an initial surge that is required to start the appliance. http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

Slide 6:

You will find that some appliances, such as microwaves use twice as much wattage at start-up. People often trip up when buying generators because they forget to account for the start-up power required for their appliances. You might have to do a bit of research to find out what these ratings are . In this example, imagine the microwave has a surge of 800 watts (microwave often have a start-up double the stated wattage). To run all of these appliances, you would actually need a 2400-watt generator, so the IG2600H would work because it has a power rating of 2600watts. Don’t worry if you find this confusing. Just speak to the staff at kipor that will help you work out which generator will work the best for you. Their collection includes the IG2600H. http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

Thank You:

Thank You http://www.kiporuk.co.uk

authorStream Live Help