The Second Chance Project @ ...

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

The Second Chance Project @ ...

Comments

Presentation Transcript

The Second Chance Project @ …:

The Second Chance Project @ … The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0450 Voice | Fax | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Matthew 18:21-22 (NIV)   The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant   21 Then Peter came to Jesus and asked, "Lord, how many times shall I forgive my brother when he sins against me? Up to seven times?" 22 Jesus answered, "I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times.   Luke 5:30-32 (NIV)   30 But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law who belonged to their sect complained to his disciples, "Why do you eat and drink with tax collectors and 'sinners'?" 31 Jesus answered them, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. 32 I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance." 2

Introduction:

Introduction There are currently over 2.2 million individuals serving time in federal and state prisons, and millions of people cycle through local jails every year. Approximately, 95 percent will be released and return to communities across the nation; A majority of these individuals have needs that, may negatively impact their ability to live productive, pro-social, crime-free lives; These needs include housing and employment challenges, relationship & family issues, substance abuse and mental health problems. 3

Introduction:

Introduction 4 The Second Chance Act legislation authorizes federal grants to government agencies and nonprofit organizations to provide: Employment Assistance, Housing, Substance Abuse Treatment, Family Programming, Mentoring, Victim’s Support, And Other Related Services. The Second Chance Act also establishes the National Offender Re-entry Resource Center.

Introduction:

5 Introduction In 2007, the Second Chance Act allocated $360 million towards programs that would help the ex-offenders adjust to their new environment after their release from prison. The focus was on four different areas: Employment, Housing, Access to Health Services and Families..." "The reality is that there are limited prospects for persons with criminal records. Each time they acknowledge their criminal pasts on job applications, they are likely to be turned away.” - Rep. Charles Rangel

The Second Chance Act of 2007:

The Second Chance Act of 2007 6 The Second Chance Act serves to reform the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968. The purpose of the Second Chance Act is to reduce recidivism, increase public safety, and assist states and communities to address the growing population of inmates returning to communities. The focus has been placed on four areas: jobs, housing, substance abuse/mental health treatment and families.

The Second Chance Act of 2007:

7 The Second Chance Act of 2007 On April 20, 2005 Representative Robert Portman (R-OH2) introduced H.R.4676 and Senator Samuel Brownback (R-KS) introduced S.2789 Second Chance Act 2005 during the 108th Congressional Session however both bills died in committee. During the 109th Congressional Legislative Session, Senator Arlen Specter (D-PA) introduced S.1934 and Representative Robert Portman (R-OH2) reintroduced the Second Chance Act (2007) S 1934 without success. However, during the 110th Congressional Legislative Session, Sen. Joseph Biden (D-DE) and Representative Danny K. Davis (D-IL7) successfully ushered the passage of H.R.1593 Second Chance Act of 2007 receiving bipartisan support from 218 Democrats, 129 Republicans enacting the bill into legislation on April 9, 2008.

The Second Chance Act of 2007:

8 The Second Chance Act of 2007 The Second Chance Act provides a number of grants, over a two-year period, to state and local governments in order to: Promote the safe and successful reintegration of offenders into the community upon their release, Provide employment services, substance abuse treatment, housing, family programming, mentoring, victim services, and methods to improve release and relocation, Provide mentoring services to adult and juvenile offenders, implement family-based treatment programs for incarcerated parents who have minor children, Provide guidance to the Bureau of Prisons for enhanced reentry planning procedures, Provide information on health, employment, personal finance, release requirements and community resources

The Second Chance Act of 2009:

The Second Chance Act of 2009 9 On March 16, 2009, Congressman Charles B. Rangel [D-NY] sponsored and introduced The Second Chance for Ex-Offenders Act of 2009 [HR 1529] which would permit expungement of records of certain nonviolent criminal offenses.

The Second Chance Act of 2009:

10 The Second Chance Act of 2009 It amends the federal criminal code to allow an individual to file a petition for expungement of a record of conviction for a nonviolent criminal offense if such individual has: never been convicted of a violent offense and has never been convicted of a nonviolent offense other than the one for which expungement is sought; (2) fulfilled all requirements of the sentence of the court in which conviction was obtained; (3) remained free from dependency on or abuse of alcohol or a controlled substance for a minimum of one year and has been rehabilitated, to the court's satisfaction, if so required by the terms of supervised release; (4) obtained a high school diploma or completed a high school equivalency program ; and (5) completed at least one year of community service.

The Second Chance Act of 2009:

11 The Second Chance Act of 2009 Qualifications The bill specifies five criteria that individuals must meet in order to qualify for the Second Chance Act. They are: No convictions for a violent offense and no conviction for a nonviolent offense other than the one they are trying to expunge. Must have fulfilled all requirements of their sentence. Must have remained free from drug or alcohol dependency for at least one year and have been rehabilitated to the court's satisfaction, if that is part of their sentence. Must have obtained a high school diploma or GED. Must have completed at least one year of community service, as determined by the court.

The Second Chance Act of 2009:

12 The Second Chance Act of 2009 Disclosure The Department of Justice would maintain nonpublic manual or computerized index of expunged records containing former offenders names and contact information for the agency, office, or department with custody of the expunged records for contact purposes. The former offender would be required to make their records available in the following scenarios: To the licensing agency or office when attempting to obtain a license to carry a firearm; To law enforcement when involved in a criminal investigation; To any city, state, or federal employers when applying for a job in those fields related to investigation or prosecution of people under civil or criminal statues, such as a police officer. Anyone other than the offender disclosing information about their expunged criminal offense would be subject to fine or imprisonment for up to a year. Reversal Any subsequent conviction, at either Federal or State level, would result in a restoration of the expunged record.

The Second Chance Act of 2012:

The Second Chance Act of 2012 13 The grant program authorized under Section 101 of the Second Chance Act helps states, units of local government, and Indian tribal governments to develop and implement comprehensive and collaborative strategies to address the challenges that offender reentry and recidivism reduction pose. Reentry‖ is not a specific program, but rather a research-driven process that starts when an offender is initially incarcerated and ends when the offender has been successfully reintegrated into his or her community as a law-abiding citizen. The reentry process includes the delivery of a variety of program services in both pre- and post-release settings to ensure that the offender safely and successfully transitions from a juvenile residential facility to the community.

The Second Chance Act of 2012:

14 The Second Chance Act of 2012 Evidence-Based Programs or Practices OJP considers programs and practices to be evidence-based when their effectiveness has been demonstrated by causal evidence (generally obtained through one or more outcome evaluations). Causal evidence documents a relationship between an activity or intervention (including technology) and its intended outcome, including measuring the direction and size of a change, and the extent to which a change may be attributed to the activity or intervention. Causal evidence depends on the use of scientific methods to rule out, to the extent possible, alternative explanations for the documented change. The strength of causal evidence, based on the factors described above, will influence the degree to which OJP considers a program or practice to be evidence-based. OJP’s CrimeSolutions.gov and OJJDP’s Model Programs Guide.

Paradigm Shifting:

Paradigm Shifting 15 Through the SCA, the Bureau of Justice Assistance has awarded more than $250 million — through 300 grants to government agencies and nonprofit organizations — to help medium- and high-risk adult and juvenile offenders successfully re-enter society and  remain crime-free. This fall, NIJ released a report on the first phase of a two-phase evaluation of demonstration sites funded under the SCA. Called an "implementation evaluation," this phase was an in-depth examination of 10 state and local government agencies from around the country that were among the first to receive SCA funding.

Paradigm Shifting:

16 Paradigm Shifting A Social Imperative Ron D'Amico, the principal investigator on the evaluation, cites significant — and straightforward — reasons why the nation's ability to reintegrate prisoners has become a social policy imperative. "We have huge numbers of people who have been incarcerated over the past few decades," said D'Amico, a senior social scientist with Social Policy Research Associates. “The numbers are, frankly, staggering: More than 1.6 million adults were in state and federal prisons in 2010; 750,000 were in local jails in 2010; More than 4.8 million were under community supervision in 2011; 700,000 were released in 2011, four times the number released into the community 30 years ago.

Paradigm Shifting:

17 Paradigm Shifting Within three years of release from jail or prison, two-thirds of offenders are rearrested and half are reincarcerated for a new crime or parole violation. In addition to the extraordinary burden this places on the nation's correctional system, there is the stark reality of the individual lives behind the numbers. Half of offenders have not graduated from high school, and many have drug-abuse problems or mental or physical impairments. They face overwhelming challenges finding work and housing and reintegrating with their families.

Paradigm Shifting:

18 Paradigm Shifting The recently released findings from this first phase show three major system changes: Partnerships are growing. Services are becoming more "holistic." There is a cultural shift in thinking about how services are delivered.

Systems Reform Planning – 2014 Juvenile Justice Reform:

Systems Reform Planning – 2014 Juvenile Justice Reform 19 Developing a Juvenile Reentry System that reduces recidivism and improves positive youth outcomes is extremely challenging for even the most sophisticated state or local juvenile correctional agency. The 2014 [RFP] solicitation [targeted] funding for 12-month planning grants during which time state or local-level juvenile justice agencies [would] convene a reentry task force and develop and finalize a comprehensive statewide juvenile reentry systems reform strategic plan. This plan will guide efforts to reduce the historical baseline recidivism rates for youth returning from confinement in state or locally run and/or managed juvenile correctional facilities.

Systems Reform Planning – 2014 Juvenile Justice Reform:

20 Systems Reform Planning – 2014 Juvenile Justice Reform The plan will also guide efforts to reform the system to include: Improved assessment policies and practices; (2) A more integrated approach to prerelease services and planning and post-release services and supervision that reflects what research demonstrates improves youth outcomes; and (3) Enhanced program/policy monitoring, quality assessments, implementation supports, accountability practices, and youth outcome data collection, analysis, reporting, and decision-making.

The Utilizing Mentors Initiative:

The Utilizing Mentors Initiative 21 Mentoring of formerly incarcerated individuals can be an important element of reentry strategies that achieve these goals. A core component of programs supported under this solicitation is the utilization of trained mentors who are assigned to program participants. The assigned mentors then support the individuals’ preparations for release and help to link them to programs and services in the community that address their identified needs. In addition, mentors provide emotional support and encouragement to individuals returning from incarceration, hold them accountable throughout the treatment process, and play active roles in promoting positive behavioral changes.

The Utilizing Mentors Initiative:

22 The Utilizing Mentors Initiative “Mentoring” refers to a developmental relationship in which a more experienced person helps a less experienced person develop specific knowledge and skills to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. Mentoring is a process that includes the informal transmission of knowledge, social capital, and psychosocial support that are perceived by the recipient as relevant to work, career, and/or professional and personal development. The primary goal of the mentoring process is preparing an individual (pre-release) for reentry, and supporting him/her during the reentry process to enhance success and promote public safety (post-release). Mentoring involves communication and is relationship-based.

Evidence-Based Correctional Practices:

Evidence-Based Correctional Practices 23 Based upon reliable research findings, there are six fundamental principles of evidence-based correctional practice that are widely accepted as strategies to reduce future criminal behavior. 1. Objectively Assess Criminogenic Risks and Needs 2. Enhance Intrinsic Motivation 3. Target Higher-Risk Offenders 4. Address Offenders’ Greatest Criminogenic Needs 5. Use Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions 6. Determine Dosage and Intensity of Services

Evidence-Based Correctional Practices:

24 Evidence-Based Correctional Practices Questions to Ask As You Launch Your Program:   Who are you targeting for your program?   Do the risk and needs of your target population match the services and supports you’ve funded through your Second Chance grant?   When and how are the risks and needs of your target population assessed?   Following the risk/need assessment, are the services, supervision, and interventions recommendations developed with the offender?   Are these interventions based upon a systematic assessment of individual levels of risk and criminogenic needs?   How are services coordinated for your target population as they move from the institutional phase, to the reentry phase, to the community phase?

Evidence-Based Correctional Practices:

25 Evidence-Based Correctional Practices How is programming that is begun in prison linked to the programming that the offender receives in the community?   How are supervision and treatment resources prioritized for moderate and high risk offenders?   Are your interventions cognitive-behavioral based?   What data is collected on individuals?   Do you collect case-level data on which of your program participants have:   (1) Housing,   (2) Employment,   (3) Substance Abuse Treatment [if necessary],   (4) Mental Health Treatment [if necessary], and   (5) Social Support?

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 26

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0450 Voice | Fax | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org 27

authorStream Live Help