T1D Slide Show

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PowerPoint Presentation:

A closer look at Type 1

PowerPoint Presentation:

A closer look at Type 1 A life full of highs and lows…

Every day, before a Diabetic can eat, drink, sleep, or participate in physical activity, they must prick their finger to test their glucose levels.:

Every day, before a Diabetic can eat, drink, sleep, or participate in physical activity, they must prick their finger to test their glucose levels.

We do our best to keep the results within normal range.:

We do our best to keep the results within normal range.

But sometimes we experience dangerous highs…:

But sometimes we experience dangerous highs…

And even more dangerous lows!:

And even more dangerous lows!

When the results are low, we need to introduce sugar into the bloodstream. Early symptoms can be treated by drinking fruit juice or taking glucose tablets. If symptoms are more severe, we may need a glucagon injection.:

When the results are low, we need to introduce sugar into the bloodstream. Early symptoms can be treated by drinking fruit juice or taking glucose tablets. If symptoms are more severe, we may need a glucagon injection.

Without treatment, we risk hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include dizziness, trembling, sweating, anxiety, and heart palpitations. Severe prolonged hypoglycemia can lead to loss of consciousness and seizures. :

Without treatment, we risk hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include dizziness, trembling, sweating, anxiety, and heart palpitations. S evere prolonged hypoglycemia can lead to loss of consciousness and seizures .

If the results are high, we need to take an insulin injection.:

If the results are high, we need to take an insulin injection.

Without insulin, we risk hyperglycemia. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include tension headache, fatigue, frequent urination, dehydration, dry mouth, excessive thirst, and difficulty concentrating. :

Without insulin, we risk hyperglycemia. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include tension headache, fatigue, frequent urination, dehydration, dry mouth, excessive thirst, and difficulty concentrating.

If untreated, high blood sugars can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), also known as “Diabetic coma,” requiring hospitalization.:

If untreated, high blood sugars can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), also known as “Diabetic coma,” requiring hospitalization.

In many cases, especially with young children, DKA is experienced which uncovers the diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes.:

In many cases, especially with young children, DKA is experienced which uncovers the diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes.

Most children are then placed on an insulin infusion pump, accompanied by a continuous glucose monitor. :

Most children are then placed on an insulin infusion pump, accompanied by a continuous glucose monitor.

This requires two ports to be embedded under the skin, and changed every three days.:

This requires two ports to be embedded under the skin, and changed every three days.

While insulin allows for daily maintenance of T1D, there are numerous complications of Diabetes that are inevitable over time. Those complications include::

While insulin allows for daily maintenance of T1D, there are numerous complications of Diabetes that are inevitable over time. Those complications include: Cataracts Retinopathy Glaucoma Kidney Disease Nerve Damage Heart Disease Gum Disease Foot Problems High-Risk Pregnancy Organ Failure Death

PowerPoint Presentation:

Every day with Type 1 Diabetes is a battle… A battle to stay healthy and alive. Tonight, we honor some local young people who have been fighting their battles for years.

Honoree – Chandler Hill:

Honoree – Chandler Hill Current Age: 19 years old Diagnosed at Age: 12 years old

Honoree – Chandler Hill:

Honoree – Chandler Hill Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “I test at least four times on a good day and up to on the hour on difficult days . I wear a pump with a catheter that I change every few days.”

Honoree – Chandler Hill:

Honoree – Chandler Hill “For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is eating right during a busy schedule, keeping blood sugars under control when active or sick, and just being normal.”

Honoree – Chandler Hill:

Honoree – Chandler Hill “At the age of twelve, life as I knew it changed when I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. I remember feeling sick, seeing the despondent faces and literally thinking that “die-a-betes” meant the end. I was relieved to learn that I was still in control of my destiny. Facing the daily challenges of diabetes has strengthened my character through the years.”

Honoree – Chandler Hill:

Honoree – Chandler Hill “This fall, I plan to leave home and go away to college to begin the next chapter in life. I deal with blood sugar challenges daily and am confident that I can overcome life’s obstacles with focus, hard work and determination.”

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon:

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon Current Age: 8 years old Diagnosed at Age: 18 months old

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon:

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “Seven finger pricks and a pump catheter change every three days.”

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon:

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon “Approximately 18,000 finger pricks and needle sticks since diagnosis. That means each finger, not including her thumbs, has been pricked at least TWO THOUSAND times!”

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon:

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon “The most difficult part about being a parent of a T1D child is that sleepovers , play dates, and afterschool activities are difficult and many times not possible. Due to the many variables of the disease, 24/7/365 attention is important .”

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon:

Honoree – Molly Salisbury Dillon “The commonly said phrase that reminds Molly that she has diabetes, is “stop , wash your hands, let’s check you.” Then three hours later check to see where she is. For me, as the father getting up at 1:00 or 2:00 in the morning to check her, every night no matter what. Again 24/7/365…”

Honoree – Amanda Gauger:

Honoree – Amanda Gauger Current Age: 31 years old Diagnosed at Age: 25 years old

Honoree – Amanda Gauger:

Honoree – Amanda Gauger Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “Minimum of 4 finger pricks to test glucose and 4 insulin injections. Sometimes as many as 12-15 in a day.”

Honoree – Amanda Gauger:

Honoree – Amanda Gauger “For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is knowing that I can never forget about it for one minute of the day.  I can never just "take the night off from T1D" and be carefree. Everything I do can affect my glucose levels.  It can even drop in the middle of the night sometimes while I sleep.”

Honoree – Amanda Gauger:

Honoree – Amanda Gauger “My finger tips are always sore from testing my blood, and I always have bruises on my belly from taking injections, which makes me really self-conscious.  It's a disease that is with you 24 hours a day, no matter how badly you want to sometimes forget."

Honoree – Amanda Gauger:

Honoree – Amanda Gauger “The opportunity to become involved with JDRF has meant the world to me. This organization and the people associated with it, have truly changed me. When I was first diagnosed, I felt so alone. The ability to be surrounded by others who understand what I go through and fight the same battles has made me stronger and given me hope that one day we may find a cure!”

Honoree – Lindsay Corry:

Honoree – Lindsay Corry Current Age: 21 years old Diagnosed at Age: 11 months old

Honoree – Lindsay Corry:

Honoree – Lindsay Corry Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “Around 7”

Honoree – Lindsay Corry:

Honoree – Lindsay Corry " For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is having to be in a social environment, or needing to accomplish a task, while my blood sugar is either high or low .”

Honoree – Lindsay Corry:

Honoree – Lindsay Corry “When I was younger I never noticed that my life was different. It wasn't until middle school when I began feeling different, and upset for this difference, and so I kept my diabetes a secret. This was probably the worst thing I could have done. Eventually I found that talking or writing about my diabetes made me more comfortable with this situation that I will have for the rest of my life .”

Honoree – Lindsay Corry:

Honoree – Lindsay Corry “I found a way to transition my feelings into artwork and am now practicing medical art on the subject of juvenile diabetes that I hope will inspire . Having juvenile diabetes my entire life has made me a stronger and more determined person, and proud to say that I have juvenile diabetes .”

Honoree – Ryan Martino:

Honoree – Ryan Martino Current Age: 16 years old Diagnosed at Age: 12 years old

Honoree – Ryan Martino:

Honoree – Ryan Martino Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “10-12 and more when playing sports to prevent lows; and pump insertions into abdomen every 3 days.”

Honoree – Ryan Martino:

Honoree – Ryan Martino “For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is unless there is a cure I will never get rid of this. I will live with this burden and this pump forever.”

Honoree – Ryan Martino:

Honoree – Ryan Martino “The most important thing I've learned about living with T1D is to always have hope, be positive, and let nothing stop me!”

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger:

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger Current Age: 2 years old Diagnosed at Age: 18 months old

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger:

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: 10-12 finger sticks per 24 hours (approximately every 2 1/2 hours even through the night) and pump catheter change every 48 hours

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger:

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger As a parent I would say, "For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is it is relentless, unpredictable, and shows no mercy.”

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger:

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger I think Maeve would say, "For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is not being able to eat WHAT I WANT, WHEN I WANT!”

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger:

Honoree – Maeve Hollinger “At times, I think we both still mourn the loss of the way things used to be with our kids,” mom Megan says. “Maeve might be diabetic — but the whole family now lives with diabetes. Maeve nearly died before we knew what was wrong with her.”

Honoree – Xander Romaine:

Honoree – Xander Romaine Current Age: 3 years old Diagnosed at Age: 2 years old

Honoree – Xander Romaine:

Honoree – Xander Romaine Average # of finger pricks and needle sticks per day: “6 times.”

Honoree – Xander Romaine:

Honoree – Xander Romaine "For me, the most difficult part about living with T1D is trying to monitor Xander’s blood sugar because every day is a challenge in balancing food, exercise, and insulin.”

Honoree – Xander Romaine:

Honoree – Xander Romaine “Xander checked his blood sugar for the first time this past year at Peter Pan Preschool and it has been amazing how well he has been able to handle this illness.”

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