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Prof. Dr. Gogoll \ Dr. Erschow International Economics 2009 Chapter 3 Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model

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2 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Preview • Opportunity costs and comparative advantage • A one factor Ricardian model • Production possibilities • Gains from trade • Wages and trade • Misconceptions about comparative advantage • Transportation costs and non-traded goods • Empirical evidence

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3 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Introduction • Theories of why trade occurs can be grouped into three categories: • Market size and distance between markets determine how much countries buy and sell. These transactions benefit both buyers and sellers. • Differences in labor physical capital natural resources and technology create productive advantages for countries. • Economies of scale larger is more efficient create productive advantages for countries.

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4 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Introduction cont. • The Ricardian model chapter 3 says differences in productivity of labor between countries cause productive differences leading to gains from trade. Differences in productivity are usually explained by differences in technology. • The Heckscher-Ohlin model chapter 4 says differences in labor labor skills physical capital and land between countries cause productive differences leading to gains from trade.

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5 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost • The Ricardian model uses the concepts of opportunity cost and comparative advantage. • The opportunity cost of producing something measures the cost of not being able to produce something else.

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6 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • A country faces opportunity costs when it employs resources to produce goods and services. • For example a limited number of workers could be employed to produce either roses or computers. The opportunity cost of producing computers is the amount of roses not produced. The opportunity cost of producing roses is the amount of computers not produced. A country faces a trade off: how many computers or roses should it produce with the limited resources that it has

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7 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • Suppose that in the US 10 million roses can be produced with the same resources that could produce 100000 computers. • Suppose that in Ecuador 10 million roses can be produced with the same resources that could produce 30000 computers. • Workers in Ecuador would be less productive than those in the US in manufacturing computers. • Quick quiz: what is the opportunity cost for Ecuador if it decides to produce roses

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8 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • Ecuador has a lower opportunity cost of producing roses. Ecuador can produce 10 million roses compared to 30000 computers that it could otherwise produce. The US can produce 10 million roses compared to 100000 computers that it could otherwise produce.

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9 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • The US has a lower opportunity cost in producing computers. Ecuador can produce 30000 computers compared to 10 million roses that it could otherwise produce. The US can produce 100000 computers compared to 10 million roses that it could otherwise produce. The US can produce 30000 computers compared to 3.3 million roses that it could otherwise produce.

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10 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • A country has a comparative advantage in producing a good if the opportunity cost of producing that good is lower in the country than it is in other countries. • A country with a comparative advantage in producing a good uses its resources most efficiently when it produces that good compared to producing other goods.

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11 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Cost cont. • The US has a comparative advantage in computer production: it uses its resources more efficiently in producing computers compared to other uses. • Ecuador has a comparative advantage in rose production: it uses its resources more efficiently in producing roses compared to other uses. • Suppose initially that Ecuador produces computers and the US produces roses and that both countries want to consume computers and roses. • Can both countries be made better off

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12 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Trade Millions of Roses Thousands of Computers U.S. -10 +100 Ecuador +10 -30 Total 0 +70

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13 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage and Trade cont. • In this simple example we see that when countries specialize in production in which they have a comparative advantage more goods and services can be produced and consumed. Initially both countries could only consume 10 million roses and 30 thousand computers. When they produced goods in which they had a comparative advantage they could still consume 10 million roses but could consume 100000 – 30000 70000 more computers.

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14 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A One Factor Ricardian Model • The simple example with roses and computers explains the intuition behind the Ricardian model. • We formalize these ideas by constructing a slightly more complex one factor Ricardian model using the following simplifying assumptions:

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15 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A One Factor Ricardian Model cont. 1. Labor is the only resource important for production. 2. Labor productivity varies across countries usually due to differences in technology but labor productivity in each country is constant across time. 3. The supply of labor in each country is constant. 4. Only two goods are important for production and consumption: wine and cheese. 5. Competition allows laborers to be paid a “competitive” wage a function of their productivity and the price of the good that they can sell and allows laborers to work in the industry that pays the highest wage. 6. Only two countries are modeled: domestic and foreign.

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16 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A One Factor Ricardian Model cont. • Because labor productivity is constant define a unit labor requirement as the constant number of hours of labor required to produce one unit of output. a LW is the unit labor requirement for wine in the domestic country. For example if a LW 2 then it takes 2 hours of labor to produce one liter of wine in the domestic country. a LC is the unit labor requirement for cheese in the domestic country. For example if a LC 1 then it takes 1 hour of labor to produce one kg of cheese in the domestic country. A high unit labor requirement means low labor productivity.

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17 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A One Factor Ricardian Model cont. • Because the supply of labor is constant denote the total number of labor hours worked in the domestic country as a constant number L.

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18 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Possibilities •The production possibility frontier PPF of an economy shows the maximum amount of a goods that can be produced for a fixed amount of resources. •If Q C represents the quantity of cheese produced and Q W represents the quantity of wine produced then the production possibility frontier of the domestic economy has the equation: a LC Q C + a LW Q W L Total units of wine production Labor required for each unit of cheese production Total units of cheese production Labor required for each unit of wine production Total amount of labor resources

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19 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Possibilities cont.

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20 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Possibilities cont. a LC Q C + a LW Q W L • Q C L/a LC when Q W 0 • Q W L/a LW when Q C 0 • Q W L/a LW – a LC /a LW Q C : the equation for the PPF with a slope equal to – a LC /a LW • When the economy uses all of its resources the opportunity cost of cheese production is the quantity of wine that is given up reduced as Q C increases: a LC /a LW • When the economy uses all of its resources the opportunity cost is equal to the absolute value of the slope of the PPF and it is constant when the PPF is a straight line.

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21 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Possibilities cont. • To produce an additional kg of cheese requires a LC hours of work. • Each hour devoted to cheese production could have been used to produce a certain amount of wine instead equal to 1 hour/a LW hours/liter of wine 1/a LW liter of wine • For example if 1 hour is moved to cheese production that additional hour of labor could have produced 1 hour/2 hours/liter of wine 1/2 liter of wine. • The trade-off is the increased amount of cheese relative to the decreased amount of wine: a LC /a LW .

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22 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Possibilities cont. • In general the amount of the domestic economy’s production is defined by a LC Q C + a LW Q W ≤ L •This describes what an economy can produce but to determine what the economy does produce we must determine the prices of goods.

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23 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Prices and Wages •Let P C be the price of cheese and P W be the price of wine. • Because of competition hourly wages of cheese makers are equal to the market value of the cheese produced in an hour: P c /a LC hourly wages of wine makers are equal to the market value of the wine produced in an hour: P W /a LW • Because workers like high wages they will work in the industry that pays a higher hourly wage.

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24 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Prices and Wages cont. •If P C /a LC P W /a LW workers will make only cheese. If P C /P W a LC /a LW workers will only make cheese. The economy will specialize in cheese production if the price of cheese relative to the price of wine exceeds the opportunity cost of producing cheese. •If P C /a LC P W /a LW workers will make only wine. If P C /P W a LC /a LW workers will only make wine. If P W /P C a LW /a LC workers will only make wine. The economy will specialize in wine production if the price of wine relative to the price of cheese exceeds the opportunity cost of producing wine.

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25 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Production Prices and Wages cont. • If the domestic country wants to consume both wine and cheese in the absence of international trade relative prices must adjust so that wages are equal in the wine and cheese industries. If P C /a LC P W /a LW workers will have no incentive to flock to either the cheese industry or the wine industry thereby maintaining a positive amount of production of both goods. P C /P W a LC /a LW Production and consumption of both goods occurs when relative price of a good equals the opportunity cost of producing that good.

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26 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Trade in the Ricardian Model • Suppose that the domestic country has a comparative advantage in cheese production: its opportunity cost of producing cheese is lower than it is in the foreign country. a LC /a LW a LC /a LW where “” notates foreign country variables When the domestic country increases cheese production it reduces wine production less than the foreign country does because the domestic unit labor requirement of cheese production is low compared to that of wine production.

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27 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Trade in the Ricardian Model cont. • Suppose the domestic country is more efficient in wine and cheese production. •It has an absolute advantage in all production: its unit labor requirements for wine and cheese production are lower than those in the foreign country: a LC a LC and a LW a LW • A country can be more efficient in producing both goods but it will have a comparative advantage in only one good—the good that uses resources most efficiently compared to alternative production.

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28 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Trade in the Ricardian Model cont. • Even if a country is the most or least efficient producer of all goods it still can benefit from trade. • To see how all countries can benefit from trade we calculate relative prices when trade exists. Without trade relative price of a good equals the opportunity cost of producing that good. • To calculate relative prices with trade we first calculate relative quantities of world production: Q C + Q C /Q W + Q W

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29 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand • Next we consider relative supply of cheese: the quantity of cheese supplied by all countries relative to the quantity of wine supplied by all countries at each relative price of cheese P c /P W .

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30 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont. a LC /a LW a LC /a LW RS Relative price of cheese P C /P W Relative quantity of cheese Q C + Q C Q W + Q W L/a LC L /a LW

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31 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont. • There is no supply of cheese if the relative price of cheese falls below a LC /a LW . Why because the domestic country will specialize in wine production whenever P C /P W a LC /a LW And we assumed that a LC /a LW a LC /a LW so foreign workers won’t find it desirable to produce cheese either. •When P C /P W a LC /a LW domestic workers will be indifferent between producing wine or cheese but foreign workers will still produce only wine.

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32 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont. • When a LC /a LW P c /P W a LC /a LW domestic workers specialize in cheese production because they can earn higher wages but foreign workers will still produce only wine. •When a LC /a LW P C /P W foreign workers will be indifferent between producing wine or cheese but domestic workers will still produce only cheese. • There is no supply of wine if the relative price of cheese rises above a LC /a LW

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33 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont. • Relative demand of cheese is the quantity of cheese demanded in all countries relative to the quantity of wine demanded in all countries at each relative price of cheese P C /P W . • As the relative price of cheese rises consumers in all countries will tend to purchase less cheese and more wine so that the relative quantity of cheese demanded falls.

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34 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont. RD 1 a LC /a LW a LC /a LW RS Relative price of cheese P C /P W Relative quantity of cheese Q C + Q C Q W + Q W L/a LC L /a LW

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35 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Supply and Relative Demand cont.

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36 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Gains From Trade • Gains from trade come from specializing in production that use resources most efficiently and using the income generated from that production to buy the goods and services that countries desire. where “using resources most efficiently” means producing a good in which a country has a comparative advantage. • Domestic workers earn a higher income from cheese production because the relative price of cheese increases with trade.

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37 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Gains From Trade cont. • Foreign workers earn a higher income from wine production because the relative price of cheese decreases with trade making cheese cheaper and the relative price of wine increases with trade.

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38 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Gains From Trade cont. • Think of trade as an indirect method of production or a new technology that converts cheese into wine or vice versa. • Without the technology a country has to allocate resources to produce all of the goods that it wants to consume. •With the technology a country can specialize its production and trade “convert” the products for the goods that it wants to consume.

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39 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Gains From Trade cont. • We show how consumption possibilities expand beyond the production possibility frontier when trade is allowed. • Without trade consumption is restricted to what is produced. • With trade consumption in each country is expanded because world production is expanded when each country specializes in producing the good in which it has a comparative advantage.

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40 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Gains From Trade cont.

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41 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A Numerical Example Unit labor requirements for domestic and foreign countries Cheese Wine Domestic a LC 1 hour/kg a LW 2 hours/L Foreign a LC 6 hours/kg a LC 3 hours/L • a LC /a LW 1/2 a LC /a LW 2

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42 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A Numerical Example cont. • The domestic country is more efficient in both industries but it has a comparative advantage only in cheese production. • The foreign country is less efficient in both industries but it has a comparative advantage in wine production. • Quick quiz: what is its opportunity cost of producing wine what is its opportunity cost of producing cheese

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43 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A Numerical Example cont. • With trade the equilibrium relative price of cheese must be between a LC /a LW 1/2 and a LC /a LW 2 • Suppose that P C /P W 1 in equilibrium. In words one kg of cheese trades for one liter of wine.

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44 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model A Numerical Example cont. • If the domestic country does not trade it can use one hour of labor to produce 1/a LW 1/2 liter of wine. • If the domestic country does trade it can use one hour of labor to produce 1/a LC 1 kg of cheese sell this amount to the foreign country at current prices to obtain 1 liter of wine. • If the foreign country does not trade it can use one hour of labor to produce 1/a LC 1/6 kg of cheese. • If the foreign country does trade it can use one hour of labor to produce 1/a LW 1/3 liter of wine sell this amount to the domestic country at current prices to obtain 1/3 kg of cheese.

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45 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Wages • Relative wages are the wages of the domestic country relative to the wages in the foreign country. • Although the Ricardian model predicts that relative prices equalize across countries after trade it does not predict that relative wages will do the same. • Productivity technological differences determine wage differences in the Ricardian model. A country with absolute advantage in producing a good will enjoy a higher wage in that industry after trade.

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46 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Wages cont. • Suppose that P C 12/kg and P W 12/L • Since domestic workers specialize in cheese production after trade their hourly wages will be 1/a LC P C 1/112 12 • Since foreign workers specialize in wine production after trade their hourly wages will be 1/a LW P W 1/312 4 • The relative wage of domestic workers is therefore 12/4 3

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47 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Wages cont. • The relative wage lies between the ratio of the productivities in each industry. The domestic country is 6/1 6 times as productive in cheese production but only 3/2 1.5 times as productive in wine production. The domestic country has a wage rate 3 times as high as that in the foreign country. • These relationships imply that both countries have a cost advantage in production. The cost of high wages can be offset by high productivity. The cost of low productivity can be offset by low wages.

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48 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Relative Wages cont. • Because foreign workers have a wage that is only 1/3 the wage of domestic workers they are able to attain a cost advantage in wine production despite low productivity. • Because domestic workers have a productivity that is 6 times that of foreign workers in cheese production they are able to attain a cost advantage despite high wages.

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49 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Do Wages Reflect Productivity • In the Ricardian model relative wages reflect relative productivities of the two countries. • Is this an accurate assumption • Some argue that low wage countries pay low wages despite growing productivity putting high wage countries at a cost disadvantage. • But evidence shows that low wages are associated with low productivity.

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50 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Do Wages Reflect Productivity cont.

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51 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Do Wages Reflect Productivity cont. • Other evidence shows that wages rise as productivity rises. In 2000 South Korea’s labor productivity was 35 of the US level and its average wages were about 38 of US average wages. After the Korean War South Korea was one of the poorest countries in the world and its labor productivity was very low. In 1975 average wages in South Korea were still only 5 of US average wages.

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52 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Misconceptions About Comparative Advantage 1. Free trade is beneficial only if a country is more productive than foreign countries. But even an unproductive country benefits from free trade by avoiding the high costs for goods that it would otherwise have to produce domestically. High costs derive from inefficient use of resources. The benefits of free trade do not depend on absolute advantage rather they depend on comparative advantage: specializing in industries that use resources most efficiently.

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53 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Misconceptions About Comparative Advantage cont. 2. Free trade with countries that pay low wages hurts high wage countries. While trade may reduce wages for some workers thereby affecting the distribution of income within a country trade benefits consumers and other workers. Consumers benefit because they can purchase goods more cheaply more wine in exchange for cheese. Producers/workers benefit by earning a higher income by using resources more efficiently and through higher prices/wages.

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54 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Misconceptions About Comparative Advantage cont. 3. Free trade exploits less productive countries. While labor standards in some countries are less than exemplary compared to Western standards they are so with or without trade. Are high wages and safe labor practices alternatives to trade Deeper poverty and exploitation e.g. involuntary prostitution may result without export production. Consumers benefit from free trade by having access to cheaply efficiently produced goods. Producers/workers benefit from having higher profits/wages—higher compared to the alternative.

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55 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods • Suppose now there are N goods produced indexed by i 12…N. • The domestic country’s unit labor requirement for good i is a Li and that of the foreign country is a Li

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56 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • Goods will be produced wherever it is cheaper to produce them. •Let w represent the wage rate in the domestic country and w represent the wage rate in the foreign country. If wa L1 w a L1 then only the domestic country will produce good 1 since total wage payments are less there. Or equivalently if a L1 /a L1 w/w If the relative productivity of a country in producing a good is higher than the relative wage then the good will be produced in that country.

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57 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • Suppose there are 5 goods produced in the world:

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58 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. •If w/w 3 the domestic country will produce apples bananas and caviar while the foreign country will produce dates and enchiladas. The relative productivities of the domestic country in producing apples bananas and caviar are higher than the relative wage.

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59 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • If each country specializes in goods that use resources productively and trades the products for those that it wants to consume then each benefits. If a country tries to produce all goods for itself resources are “wasted”. • The domestic country has high productivity in apples bananas and caviar that give it a cost advantage despite its high wage. • The foreign country has low wages that give it a cost advantage despite its low productivity in dates.

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60 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • How is the relative wage determined • By the relative supply and relative derived demand for labor services. • The relative derived demand for domestic labor services falls when w/w rises. As domestic labor becomes more expensive relative to foreign labor goods produced in the domestic country become more expensive and demand for these goods and the labor to produce them falls. fewer goods will be produced in the domestic country further reducing the demand for domestic labor.

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61 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont.

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62 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • Suppose w/w increases from 3 to 3.99: The domestic country would produce apples bananas and caviar but the demand for these goods and the labor to produce them falls as the relative wage rises. • Suppose w/w increases from 3.99 to 4.01: Caviar is now too expensive to produce in the domestic country so the caviar industry moves to the foreign country causing a discrete abrupt drop in the demand for domestic labor. • Consider similar effects as w/w rises from 0.75 to 10.

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63 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont.

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64 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont. • Finally suppose that relative supply of labor is independent of w/w and is fixed at an amount determined by the populations in the domestic and foreign countries.

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65 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Comparative Advantage With Many Goods cont.

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66 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Transportation Costs and Non-traded Goods • The Ricardian model predicts that countries should completely specialize in production. • But this rarely happens for primarily 3 reasons: 1. More than one factor of production reduces the tendency of specialization chapter 4 2. Protectionism chapters 8–11 3. Transportation costs reduce or prevent trade which may cause each country to produce the same good or service

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67 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Transportation Costs and Non-traded Goods cont. •Non-traded goods and services e.g. haircuts and auto repairs exist due to high transportation costs. Countries tend to spend a large fraction of national income on non-traded goods and services. This fact has implications for the gravity model and for models that consider how income transfers across countries affect trade.

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68 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Empirical Evidence • Do countries export those goods in which their productivity is relatively high • The ratio of US to British exports in 1951 compared to the ratio of US to British labor productivity in 26 manufacturing industries suggests yes. • At this time the US had an absolute advantage in all 26 industries yet the ratio of exports was low in the least productive sectors of the US.

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69 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Empirical Evidence cont.

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70 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Summary 1. A country has a comparative advantage in producing a good if the opportunity cost of producing that good is lower in the country than it is in other countries. A country with a comparative advantage in producing a good uses its resources most efficiently when it produces that good compared to producing other goods. 2. The Ricardian model focuses only on differences in the productivity of labor across countries and it explains gains from trade using the concept of comparative advantage.

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71 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Summary cont. 3. When countries specialize and trade according to the Ricardian model the relative price of the produced good rises income for workers rises and imported goods are less expensive for consumers. 4. Trade is predicted to benefit both high productivity and low productivity countries although trade may change the distribution of income within countries. 5. High productivity or low wages give countries a cost advantage that allow them to produce efficiently.

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72 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Summary cont. 7. Although empirical evidence supports trade based on comparative advantage transportation costs and other factors prevent complete specialization in production.

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73 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model

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74 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model

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75 Chapter 3. Labor Productivity and Comparative Advantage: The Ricardian Model Slides are prepared in accordance to the chapters structure of: International Economics: Theory and policy/ Krugman Paul R. Obstfeld Maurice © Pearson Addison-Wesley. And are supposed to be used by MIEPM students as additional material to the book.

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