Utilizing CRS

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How do I and why should I utilize a Classroom Response System (CRS) with my students?:

How do I and why should I utilize a Classroom Response System (CRS) with my students? Catrina Parker ECI 511 Summer 2007

What is a CRS?:

What is a CRS? A classroom response system is composed of hardware and software that allows teachers to pose questions, usually true/false or multiple choice, to students via a projector. Students respond using handheld transmitters (clickers) that relay their answers through infrared or radio-frequency signals. After inputting students’ responses electronically, the software outputs a histogram depicting how many students chose particular answers. - Derek Bruff, Assistant Director, Vanderbilt Center for Teaching

Other Names for CRS:

Other Names for CRS Audience Response Systems Voting Machines Wireless Keypad Response Systems Electronic Response Systems Classroom Communication Systems (CCS) Classroom Performance System (CPS)

Components of CRS:

Components of CRS Click on the link below to visit the home-page for e-Instruction. 2) Follow the directions and explore the components of the CRS that this company offers. http://www.einstruction.com/WhatisCPS/index.cfm

Purposes of CRS:

Purposes of CRS Student Activity Communication Learning Desire & Commitment Customized Instruction Data Collection - Harold Horowitz, IBM Corporate Education Center

Video Introduction to CRS:

Video Introduction to CRS 1) Click on the link below to visit the home- page for e-Instruction. 2) Click on the “Watch an online demo on CPS” link to view an introductory video on classroom response systems. http://www.einstruction.com/Solutions/K12/index.cfm

Activities Applicable to CRS :

Activities Applicable to CRS Ask the Audience Peer Instruction Attendance Quizzes Interactive Demonstrations Data Gathering - Derek Bruff, Assistant Director, Vanderbilt Center for Teaching

Ask the Audience:

Ask the Audience Teacher poses a true/false or multiple-choice question. Students respond using their “clickers”. Teachers receive results immediately. Teachers can choose to display results or keep them private. Teachers can also display results anonymously, using student id numbers, or student names. Used at various points during instruction to gauge student learning and/or modify instruction accordingly. Making the results public provides an avenue for whole-class and/or small group discussion.

Peer Instruction:

Peer Instruction Teacher poses a true/false or multiple-choice question. Students respond using their “clickers”. Teachers receive results immediately. Teacher reviews results privately. If a significant number of students missed a particular question, students are given an opportunity to discuss the question with their neighbor(s). Teacher poses question again and reviews results. Giving students a chance to discuss frequently missed questions may result in more correct answers the second time the question is posed. If not, a whole-class discussion may be needed.

Attendance:

Attendance Attendance can be taken by having students check-in or log-in using their assigned clicker. Attendance can also be taken by having students check-in or log-in using their student identification numbers or names.

Quizzes:

Quizzes When students are assigned particular clickers or log-in using i.d. numbers or names, in-class true/false and/or multiple-choice quizzes can be administered in a whole-class setting. Teachers receive immediate feddback on students’ progress.

Interactive Demonstrations:

Interactive Demonstrations Students can be asked to make predictions before being shown an experiment, reading a passage, watching a movie, or learning a new mathematical process.

Data Gathering:

Data Gathering Teachers can use classroom response systems to gather opinions or other data very quickly. Displaying this information can provide a platform for discussion because students may be surprised by others’ feelings, responses, and opinions.

Types of Questions Applicable to CRS:

Types of Questions Applicable to CRS Type of Question Description Yes/No or True/False elicits an opinion can be used to compare & contrast 2 questions/issues/statements Multiple Choice -elicits one correct answer -can be used to complete sentences/thoughts/ideas Mean Numeric Entry -no one correct answer; usually a range Correct Numeric Entry -question has only one correct numerical answer Rating Scale -elicits feeling or opinion - Harold Horowitz, IBM Corporate Education Center

PowerPoint Presentation:

Type of Question Example Yes/No or True/False Was George Washington the first president of the United States of America? Multiple Choice _______________ was the first president of the United States of America. George Washington Abraham Lincoln Hilary Clinton Mean Numeric Entry How old are you? Correct Numeric Entry What is the mean of {2, 4, 6, 8}? Rating Scale Rank your readiness for tomorrow’s test on a scale from 1 to 5. Types of Questions Applicable to CRS

Advantages of CRS:

Advantages of CRS Increased student engagement and participation Forces every student to participate Encourages a collaborative learning environment Provides an avenue to discuss student misconceptions Individual response system gives shy and/or slower students a “safer” opportunity to participate Easy and quick way to administer quizzes and take attendance Provides immediate feedback on students’ progress

Challenges to Integrating a CRS:

Challenges to Integrating a CRS difficult to create meaningful multiple-choice questions applicable to majority of topics/concepts discussed in class funding unpredictable technical problems time classroom management flexibility of teachers to adapt instruction

Where can I find more information?:

Where can I find more information? 1.Vanderbuilt Center for Teaching http://www.vanderbilt.edu/cft/resources/teaching_resources/technology/crs.htm#teaching 2. IBM Corporate Education Center https://sharepoint.cisat.jmu.edu/tsec/jim/CRS/pdf%20files/interactivity_in_classrooms.pdf 3. University of Massachussets – Amherst http://umperg.physics.umass.edu/topics/crs/systems 4. University of Guelph Technology Brief http://www.tss.uoguelph.ca/pdfs/ClickerBrief.pdf 5. Paper on Designing Questions http://umperg.physics.umass.edu/library/Beatty_2006deq 6. Wiley Higher Education http://he-cda.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-103701.html 7. Quizdom http://www.qwizdom.com/k_12_overview.php 8. SmartRoom http://www.smartroom.com/k12.htmhttp://www.smartroom.com/k12.htm Websites

Where can I find more information?:

Where can I find more information? 9. Fies, C., & Marshall, J. (2006, March 1). Classroom Response Systems: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Science Education and Technology , 15 (1), 101. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ748828) Retrieved June 11, 2007, from ERIC database. 10. Roberts, G. (2005, January 1). Instructional Technology That's Hip High-Tech. Computers in Small Libraries. Computers in Libraries , 25 (10ov-Dec), 26. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ720405) Retrieved June 11, 2007, from ERIC database. 11. Gerace, W., Dufresne, R., Leonard, W., & Massachusetts Univ., A. (1999, January 1). Using Technology To Implement Active Learning in Large Classes. Technical Report. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED471419) Retrieved June 11, 2007, from ERIC database. Articles

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