9-The End of Reconstruction

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The End of Reconstruction : 

Aim: How did the end of Reconstruction affect Southern society? The End of Reconstruction

Do Now : 

Below is a poll. Each question has to do with the end of Reconstruction. Read each statement below, and circle the number that expresses how well you agree with each statement. 1. “Racist people can’t be stopped without the threat of violence.” 2. “The U.S government can be trusted to take care of all its citizens.” 3. “Separating people by race is always unfair.” 4. “Separating people by race is fair as long as they still have equal rights.” 5. “White people can be trusted to govern black people.” Do Now

Slide 3: 

1. The American Army withdrew from the South after the Compromise of 1877

Notes : 

2. The Compromise of 1877 said: A. Federal troops would leave the South B. The government would give the south money for railroads and improvement projects 3. Immediately after the Compromise of 1877, Democrats returned to power in the South. Notes

Slide 5: 

4. These Democrats were white and racist.

Notes : 

5. Laws were quickly passed in the South that: A. Made black people pay a poll tax to vote Notes

Slide 7: 

B. Made black people pass a literacy test to vote

Slide 8: 

C. did not punish people who attacked African-Americans

Slide 9: 

D. re-established the idea of “white supremacy” in the South.

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6. Keeping races separate was called “segregation.” 7. For almost the next hundred years, African Americans were:

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A. Forced to go to different schools

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B. Not allowed to shop at the same stores

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C. not allowed to go to the same churches

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D. separated from whites publicly in every way.

Notes : 

8. This policy was made official by the Supreme Court in 1896 in the case called Plessy v. Ferguson, which officially established the idea of “separate but equal.” 9. The laws segregating life in the South by race were known as Jim Crow laws, and remained in place for nearly 100 years. Notes

Notes : 

Notes Keeping races separate was called segregation. For almost the next hundred years, African Americans were: A. Forced to go to different schools B. Not allowed to shop at the same stores C. not allowed to go to the same churches D. discriminated against everywhere SEPARATE… BUT EQUAL??

Document 1: This is a postcard that was sent from Waco, Texas, in 1916: : 

Document 1: This is a postcard that was sent from Waco, Texas, in 1916:

Document 2: Running ‘round the 15th amendment : 

Document 2: Running ‘round the 15th amendment

Document 3: The following is a political cartoon that appeared in Harper’s Weekly in 1889. The cartoon takes place at a voting booth in the South. : 

Document 3: The following is a political cartoon that appeared in Harper’s Weekly in 1889. The cartoon takes place at a voting booth in the South.

Document 4: The following are pictures of “separate but equal” schools and theatres for blacks and whites after Reconstruction. : 

Document 4: The following are pictures of “separate but equal” schools and theatres for blacks and whites after Reconstruction.

Black School : 

Black School

White School : 

White School

Black Theater : 

Black Theater

White Theater : 

White Theater

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