securit by Roohullah shabon

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SECURITY & RISK MANAGEMENT : 

SECURITY & RISK MANAGEMENT by |Dr R Shabon

OBJECTIVES : 

OBJECTIVES To raise awareness handling on time emergency situations in the field To improve knowledge & skills on general & personal security

FACTS : 

FACTS “It seems as if some barrier has been broken and anyone can be regarded as a target, even those bringing food to the hungry and medical care to the wounded.” Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Field work has become more dangerous. In addition to general crime, both local and international staff can be targets of violence for many reasons.

SECURITY : 

SECURITY It is all about being safer for longer Your safety depends on YOUR ability to recognize threatening situations. It is important to understand that YOU are the key factor ensuring your security and safety by complying with all security & emergency procedures and instructions.

GENERAL SECURITY FACTORS : 

GENERAL SECURITY FACTORS One of the most important factors in your ongoing assessment of security is to understand your surroundings in terms of following perspectives : Economic Cultural Environmental Political

3 TERMS IN RISK ASSESSMENT : 

3 TERMS IN RISK ASSESSMENT RISK TREAT VULNERABILITY

RISK ASSESSMENT : 

RISK ASSESSMENT Analysis of the risks to which we are exposed Balance effectiveness and efficiency Good risk assessment helps us to make informed decisions which security measures to adopt Does not include accidents and illness

RISK : 

RISK Is the probability that an event will occur. It is most often used to express the probability that a particular outcome will occur following a particular exposure. A function of the threats in the environment and our vulnerability to them. Viewed as the likelihood and impact of encountering a threat

RISKS : 

RISKS Staff casualties Lost / damaged assets Inefficient operations Restricted programs Program closure Damaged reputation Loss of donor support

THREAT : 

THREAT A potential act that may result in harm or injury to staff, or loss of - or damage to – organization property or programme

THREATS : 

THREATS Sexual attacks Violent robbery Political acts Protests, riots Violence Terrorism Wrong place Wrong time

VULNERABILITY : 

VULNERABILITY The extent to which staff and / or property of RTP or our programs are exposed to a threat

VULNERABILITIES : 

VULNERABILITIES Mission Location Timing Inexperience Competence/orientation (govt, UN, USA) Communication facilities Transport facilities Nationality Staff stress/attitude Cultural sensitivity Associations Limited evacuation option Ethnicity Gender

Relationship Between Concepts : 

Relationship Between Concepts RISK = THREATS (external) x VULNERABILITY (internal)

SECURITY MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK : 

SECURITY MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK We are practicing risk management at all times Acceptance Protection Deterrence Security Management Framework RTP

UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT : 

UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT Acceptance Reduces/eliminates threats by aiming for universal acceptance (by the community) Protection Defensive Reduce exposure to the threat Reduce or increase visibility Protective equipment Protective measures & procedures

UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT : 

UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT Deterrence Poses a counter threat to those who threaten you Legal , economic, political sanctions Armed force Severe Implications Sanctions can punish the innocent Who will threaten and when? Non-realistic?

PERSONAL SECURITY : 

PERSONAL SECURITY Understand the cultural environment Manage your behaviour Watch your communication and body language Be aware of your limits, habits and strength Keep in good health Bring a sense of humour Take proper rest Plan your day Never promise assistance you can not deliver

5 PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL SECURITY : 

5 PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL SECURITY Be aware and suspicious-Look for the unusual Avoid routine Be methodical and disciplined in establishing security procedures Maintain good communications Adhere to procedures, but exercise initiative and common sense in an emergency

10 PERSONAL STRATEGIES : 

10 PERSONAL STRATEGIES Be alert and aware Know how to use local phones Carry correct change or local phone card Know emergency telephone numbers Carry your communication device, Radio, Phone Carry security money

BASIC STRATEGIES CONTINUED : 

BASIC STRATEGIES CONTINUED Carry Valuables in Front pockets & Under clothing Only carry keys that you need, don’t put name & address on keys No early morning or late hours work in office – always tell your RTP team member if you must Tell your team member your travel plans Where you are going & When you are leaving When you are returning Call them when you get there and when you get home

SCENARIO : 

SCENARIO Team driving back from refugee camp in remote area There are Villages along the way, business as usual, the team has driven this road many times. Suddenly a child runs in front of the vehicle. Driver does emergency breaking and swerves around the child hitting the curb and loosing control of vehicle. Driver and volunteer 1 in the front seats wearing seatbelts, getting out of the car unhurt. Team member (volunteer 2) in back seat is bleeding, unconscious and needs medical attention. Vehicle is disabled. Vehicle is equipped with VHF radio; the team has a Thuraya (satellite phone) and Cellular phone.

CASE STUDY: Incident Reporting : 

CASE STUDY: Incident Reporting Please describe your action steps in reporting the accident: Group I: Immediate action: Verbal Report ( on the spot) Group II: Written Report ( post incident)

INCIDENT REPORTS: Verbal & Written : 

INCIDENT REPORTS: Verbal & Written When do you make an incident report? VERBAL: During or immediately after an incident WRITTEN: Post-incident, as soon as safe

STRUCTURE OF THE VERBAL REPORT : 

STRUCTURE OF THE VERBAL REPORT With SAD: Security, Accuracy, Discipline ESSENTIAL INFORMATION? WHO - call sign, name WHERE- location WHEN - time of incident WHAT - description of the incident FURTHER INFORMATION? WHAT ACTION TAKEN WHAT DO YOU NEED

THE WRITTEN, POST-INCIDENT REPORT : 

THE WRITTEN, POST-INCIDENT REPORT To provide sufficient accurate detail for incident analysis understand why it happened minimise chances of repeat incidents minimise impact (contingencies) How should a post-incident report be made? As soon as possible after the incident In a calm and safe environment By as many people involved as possible

RTP GUIDELINES : 

RTP GUIDELINES Security Guideline Country Security Plan Emergency Procedure Manual

HAVE A SAFE MISSION! : 

HAVE A SAFE MISSION!

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