African Burial Grounds By S Castro

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African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument New York City Lower Manhattan

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument New York's African Burial ground is the nation's earliest and largest known African American cemetery. It has been called one of the most important archaeological finds of our time. But it is more than that: though long hidden and much violated it remains the final resting-place of some of New York's earliest African and African-American pioneers. And it is an enduring testament to their history. 

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Shut out of churchyards within the city a burial ground for Africans developed on a plot of land outside of the city, owned in 1673 by Sara Van Borsum , a Dutch woman Though the exact date of the cemetery's founding is unknown, the Van Borsum family continued its tacit approval of its use until its closing in 1794.

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Overtime, the Burial ground became densely crowded with burials stacked three and four deep in some places. Some archaeologists estimate that 20,000 men, women, and children were buried at the cemetery. In 1795, the land of the African Burial ground was subdivided and sold for house lots. Because it lay in a ravine, the land was leveled with as much as twenty-five feet of fill, ensuring the survival of many graves under the basements of later buildings.

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument In the twentieth century, the area where the African Burial ground is located developed as New York's government center. During these years the existence of the. African Burial ground, though recorded on old maps, was effectively forgotten. In 1991 -1992 archaeological excavation of the northern portion of the burial ground occurred as the site was being prepared for construction of a federal office building. 

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Unearthing the "Negroes Buriel Ground"- a 6-acre burial ground containing upwards of 15,000 intact skeletal remains of enslaved and free Africans who lived and worked in colonial New York. The Burial Ground’s rediscovery altered the understanding and scholarship surrounding enslavement and its contribution to constructing New York City. The Burial Ground dates from the middle 1630s to 1795. Currently, the Burial Ground is the nation’s earliest and largest African burial ground rediscovered in the United States. 

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Although it was heavy equipment that did the original unearthing, the archaeological excavation was done by hand with shovels, trowles and various other small tools. The area was surveyed and with the use of ground penetrating radar, the burial mounds was viewed for the first time.

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Rediscovery and excavation of the Burial Ground motivated scholars, academicians, researchers, cultural resource managers, politicians, religious leaders, community activists, school children, and the general public. 

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Vigils were held and ceremonies took place to honor the ancestors. Community activism directed and guided the memorialization and scientific research standards characteristically rooted within African cultural anthropology. Community activism ensured a global recognition of the spiritual aspects of the Burial Ground. Spirituality would not be lost through scientific research. 

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Burial Mound Burial Mound

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Community activism directed and guided the memorialization and scientific research standards characteristically rooted within African cultural anthropology . Archeological reports are available on the website. Michael Blakey and the archaeological team from Howard University conducted the excavation and research of the remains. Check out the report - Volume_IV_290Broadway.pdf

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument African Burial Ground National Monument Research Library house GSA’s Burial Ground Project records from 1935 – 2009 containing textual documents, images, audio-visual, and electronic records generated by GSA and the other organizations and institutions which participated in the rediscovery, documentation and memorialization of the forgotten cemetery for enslaved and free blacks in New York City.

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument The project records represent the history of the unearthing, research, and memorialization of the burial ground, the documentation of the human skeletal remains and associated artifacts. These records hold particular significance because the human remains and artifacts were reinterred in 2003 and are no longer available for study. This site means many things to New Yorkers. It has become a gathering area for all people and a place to pay homage to and worship the ancestors.

African Burial Grounds National Monument:

African Burial Grounds National Monument Coffins on display at the location of our outdoor memorial prior to their reinterment

References:

References African Burial Ground National Monument (U.S. National Park Service). (n.d.). Retrieved from https:// www.nps.gov / afbg / index.htm . Moore, C. (n.d.). African Burial Ground in History. Retrieved December 11, 2019, from https:// www.nps.gov / afbg /learn/ historyculture / african -burial-ground-in- history.htm .

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