Early Childhood Education Workforce

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Accompaniment to Chapter 6 of Continuing Issues in Early Childhood Education by Stephanie Feeney, Alice Galper, and Carol Seefeldt.

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Early Childhood Education Workforce:

Early Childhood Education Workforce Ashford University - ECE601 Instructor: Dr. Lisa Rodriguez Overview of Chapter 6 Continuing Issues in Early Childhood Education by Stephanie Feeney, Alice Galper , and Carol Seefeldt

Early Childhood Education Workforce:

Early Childhood Education Workforce Focus on Early Childhood Education Teachers Lead teachers Assistant teachers Teachers’ aides Child care centers Public school early education programs (Head Start, etc.) Home care centers Family members, friends, and neighbors as caregivers K-3 teachers Health workers Pediatric doctors Dentists Mental health professionals Social workers Physical, occupational, and speech therapists Protecting, nurturing, and advocating for children’s optimal growth and development (Feeney, Galper , & seefeldt , 2009, p. 134-135). Common Goals

Recruiting and Retaining High Quality Teachers:

Recruiting and Retaining High Quality Teachers The Paradox – Professional development and compensation are directly related to high quality teaching. But the field of early childhood education traditionally lacks support for professional development and pay is usually very low….”Many ECE teachers live at or close to the poverty line” (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 136).

Qualifications and Compensation:

Qualifications and Compensation Privately funded 11% have Bachelor’s degree or higher Average $12,740 annually FFN – Family, Friends, & Neighbors. Teachers average $7,920 annually FCC – Regulated family child care homes. Teachers average $12,740 annually State funded 73% have Bachelor’s degree or higher 36% Head Start teachers have Bachelor’s degree or higher Average $30,998 annually 89% have health insurance 80% have retirement benefits Head Start teachers – average $24,608 annually

Four Competing Forces:

Four Competing Forces 1) More working mothers = more demand for child care workers. Lack of funding means high quality teachers are difficult to recruit. Many highly qualified teachers leave for more lucrative salaries and better benefits. In response, requirements for Early Childhood Education have been LOWERED, leading to more, unqualified, underpaid teachers (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 138). 2) In the beginning, there were two different kinds of early childhood programs: those for children in low socioeconomic households to enable their mothers to work, and early education programs for children in middle and upper socioeconomic households to enhance school readiness . Just one program now…focuses on child care, education, and family partnerships. 3) Low social status for ECE teachers. The general public has a perception of ECE as babysitting. 4) Higher expectations for children’s learning. Achievement gaps, NCLB, readiness for school.

The Trilemma Of Early Childhood Education (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 140):

The Trilemma Of Early Childhood Education (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 140)

Quality Rating Systems (QRS) :

Quality Rating Systems (QRS) Financial incentives for programs. Leads to high expectations and support for ECE staff in the form of higher compensation and professional growth opportunities. By 2006, 13 states were using QRS’s, and 31 states were starting to use them. (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 141) They are not identical programs, but share common goals: Improve ECE program quality Raise public awareness of program quality Provide more funding to recruit and retain highly qualified ECE teachers http://www.docstoc.com/docs/22721538/Quality-Rating-System

Diversity:

Diversity Diverse cultures English language learners Students with special education needs Most teacher education programs leading to Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees do not require students to take a full course in caring for young children or in caring for young children with disabilities.

Head Start:

Head Start Compensatory education Started in 1965 as a program to serve children living in poverty to prepare them for school. Most teachers underqualified . Federally funded. Raised requirements for teachers. Endorsed the CDA (Child Development Associate) credential. Increased professional development in 1990’s In 2005: 33% Head Start teachers -Associate’s degree 31% -Bachelor’s degree 5% -Master’s degree (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 143). Click to start the video.

Improving Teacher Preparation:

Improving Teacher Preparation NAEYC – National Association for Education of Young Children NCATE – National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education Promoting child development and learning Building Family and Community Relationships Observing, documenting and assessing to support young children and families Teaching and Learning Becoming a professional (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 144) Five Standards for ECE Teacher Preparation

Recruiting ECE Teachers:

Recruiting ECE Teachers Disincentives Limited professional growth Low salary No health benefits No retirement benefits Low social status Few opportunities for advancement Incentives or possible solutions Signing bonuses Loan forgiveness Housing assistance Recruitment programs: Troops to Teachers Teaching Fellows Program Teach for America

Retaining ECE Teachers:

Retaining ECE Teachers Disincentives Limited professional growth Low salary No health benefits No retirement benefits Low social status Few opportunities for advancement Incentives or possible solutions Mentoring and coaching programs Career Lattices Specific educational qualifications at each level Increments between each level of the lattice that builds on prior knowledge and skills Higher compensation to reward advancement (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 146)

T.E.A.C.H.:

T.E.A.C.H. The Teacher Education and Compensation Helps Early Childhood Project Scholarship – pays for a portion of tuition and books. States or private foundations pay for scholarship. Employer required to provide participant with paid release time and travel stipend. Education – Participant must complete education, usually college coursework during contract period Compensation – At e nd of contract, after completing scholarship contract, participants are eligible to receive increased pay in a one-time bonus as an ongoing pay raise. Commitment – Participants promise to stay in current setting for 6 months to 1 year. (Feeney, et al, 2009, p. 148)

The Teacher Incentive Fund?:

The Teacher Incentive Fund? This video shows the Associate Director for Teacher Quality in the Center for American Progress, Robin Chait , discussing the Teacher Incentive Fund and the importance of recruiting and retaining high quality teachers. Center for American Progress, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu0SR1ckKBg . Click to start the video.

REFORM:

REFORM The most important element needed in order to recruit and retain high quality ECE teachers, and improve ECE programs is for society’s perception of the field of Early Childhood Education to be transformed into one that respects and appreciates the contribution it makes to society, the specialized skills and knowledge of ECE teachers, and its indispensability for the wellbeing of society.

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