Hot Air Balloon

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The Hot Air Balloon:

The Hot Air Balloon By Megan and Dawson

The First Hot Air Balloon:

The First Hot Air Balloon The first hot air balloon was made by Pilatre De Rozier o n September 19 th , 1783. He was a scientist that launched the first hot air balloon called ‘Aerostat Reveillon’. The passengers in this balloon were a sheep, a duck, and a rooster. It lasted 15 minutes and then it crashed back to the ground. Pilatre had used wallpaper to cover the balloon’s envelope. It became wet because of the extreme weather conditions. The top of the balloon was made of sheep- or buckskin. The air was heated by wood in an iron stove. To start it up, the straw was set on fire with brandy.

First Manned Attempt:

First Manned Attempt This happened 2 months later on the 21 st of November. This balloon was made by 2 French brothers, joseph and Etienne Montgolfier. This balloon was launched from the centre of Paris and was in the air for 20 minutes. These guys decided to make a public demonstration of a balloon in order to establish their claim to its invention. They constructed a globe-shaped balloon of sackcloth with three thin layers of paper inside. The envelope could contain nearly 28,000 cubic feet of air and weighed 500 lb. It was constructed of four pieces -the dome and three lateral bands- and held together by 1,800 buttons. A reinforcing fish net of cord covered the outside of the envelope.

Montgolfier Brother’s Balloon:

Montgolfier Brother’s Balloon These guys decided to make a public demonstration of a balloon in order to establish their claim to its invention. They constructed a globe-shaped balloon of sackcloth with three thin layers of paper inside. The envelope could contain nearly 28,000 cubic feet of air and weighed 500 lb. It was constructed of four pieces -the dome and three lateral bands- and held together by 1,800 buttons. A reinforcing fish net of cord covered the outside of the envelope.

1785 Balloon History:

1785 Balloon History In 1785, A French balloonist, Jean Blanchard and his American co pilot, John Jefferies became the first to fly across the E nglish Channel. The English channel was considered the first step to long distance ballooning. The same year Pilatre De Rozier was killed in his attempt at crossing the channel. His Balloon had exploded half an hour after take off due to the experimental design of using a hydrogen balloon and hot air balloon tired together.

A Large Jump in Time:

A Large Jump in Time In August of 1932 Auguste Piccard was the first to fly into the Stratosphere . He reached a height of 52,498 feet, setting the new altitude record. People continued to try and break this record in the next couple of years. In 1935, a new altitude record was set. The balloon reached an altitude of 72, 395 feet. This proved that humans could survive in a pressurized chamber in extremely high altitudes. This flight was the beginning of understanding space travel.

Hot air balloon parachuting.:

Hot air balloon parachuting. In 1960, Captain joe kittinger’s balloon reached 102,000 feet. The balloon broke the altitude record. Joe jumped from the balloon and broke the sound barrier with his body. In October 2012, Red bull repeated history by launching “ Project RedBull Stratos ”. This balloon was made to carry Felix Baumgartner to “The edge of space. ”The balloon was filled with helium to create lift. It is constructed of strips of high-performance plastic film. It had 30 million cubic feet in capacity - 10 times larger than Joe Kittinger's .

RedBull Stratos Cont.:

RedBull Stratos Cont . The balloon reached 127,851 feet. He then jumped and free fell towards the earth reaching 1,357 km/h. Felix broke the records for highest manned balloon flight and highest altitude jump. Joseph Kittinger , who previously held these records , was Baumgartner's mentor and capsule communicator at mission control .

Video:

Video Felix Baumgartner's supersonic free fall

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