Cutting_Speed_Feed_and_DOC2

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Cutting Speed, Feed, and Depth of Cut :

1 Cutting Speed, Feed, and Depth of Cut Session 13

Efficiency of a Milling Operation:

2 Efficiency of a Milling Operation Cutting speed Too slow, time wasted Too fast, time lost in replacing/regrinding cutters Feed Too slow, time wasted and cutter chatter Too fast, cutter teeth can be broken Depth of cut Several shallow cuts wastes time

Cutting Speed:

3 Cutting Speed Speed, in surface feet per minute sfm or meters per minute smm at which metal may be machined efficiently Work machined in a lathe, speed in specific number of revolutions per min (r/min) depending on its diameter to achieve proper cutting speed In milling machine, cutter revolves r/min depending on diameter for cutting speed

Important Factors in Determining Cutting Speed:

4 Important Factors in Determining Cutting Speed Type of workpiece material Cutting tool material Diameter of cutter Surface finish required Depth of cut taken Rigidity of machine and work setup

Milling Machine Cutting Speeds:

5 Milling Machine Cutting Speeds High-Speed Steel Cutter Carbide Cutter Material ft/min m/min ft/min m/min Alloy steel 40–70 12–20 150–250 45–75 Aluminum 500–1000 150–300 1000–2000 300–600 Bronze 65–120 20–35 200–400 60–120 Cast iron 50–80 15–25 125–200 40–60 Free m steel 100–150 30–45 400–600 120–180 Mach steel 70–100 21–30 150–250 45–75 Stnless steel 30–80 10–25 100–300 30–90 Tool steel 60–70 18–20 125–200 40–60

Inch Calculations:

6 Inch Calculations For optimum use from cutter, proper speed must be determined Diameter of cutter affects this speed Calculate speed required to revolve a 3-in. diameter high-speed steel milling cutter for cutting machine steel (90 sf/min). simplify formula

Metric Calculations:

7 Metric Calculations Formula for r/min of the milling machine using metric measurement simplify formula Calculate the r/min required for a 75 mm diameter high-speed steel milling cutter when cutting machine steel (CS 30 m/min)

Cutting Speed Rules for Best Results:

8 Cutting Speed Rules for Best Results For longer cutter life, use lower CS in recommended range Know hardness of material to be machined When starting, use lower range of CS and gradually increase to higher range Reduce feed instead of increase cutter speed for fine finish Use of coolant will generally produce better finish and lengthen life of cutter

Milling Machine Feed:

9 Milling Machine Feed Distance in inches (or mm) per minute that work moves into cutter Independent of spindle speed Feed: rate work moves into revolving cutter Measured in in/min or mm/min Milling feed: determined by multiplying chip size (chip per tooth) desired, number of teeth in cutter, and r/min of cutter Chip, or feed, per tooth (CPT or FPT): amount of material that should be removed by each tooth of the cutter

Factors in Feed Rate:

10 Factors in Feed Rate Depth and width of cut Design or type of cutter Sharpness of cutter Workpiece material Strength and uniformity of workpiece Type of finish and accuracy required Power and rigidity of machine, holding device and tooling setup

Recommended Feed Per Tooth - HSS:

11 Recommended Feed Per Tooth - HSS Slotting Face Helical and Side Mills Mills Mills Material in. mm in. mm in. mm Alloy steel .006 0.15 .005 0.12 .004 0.1 Aluminum .022 0.55 .018 0.45 .013 0.33 Brass and bronze (medium) .014 0.35 .011 0.28 .008 0.2 Cast iron (medium) .013 0.33 .010 0.25 .007 0.18 Sample Table See Table 60.2 in Text Table shows feed per tooth for roughing cuts – for finishing cut, the feed per tooth would be reduced to1/2 or even 1/3 of value shown

Recommended Feed Per Tooth Cemented Carbide:

12 Recommended Feed Per Tooth Cemented Carbide Slotting Face Helical and Side Mills Mills Mills Material in. mm in. mm in. mm Aluminum .020 0.5 .016 0.40 .012 0.3 Brass and bronze (medium) .012 0.3 .010 0.25 .007 0.18 Cast iron (medium) .016 0.4 .013 0.33 .010 0.25 Sample Table See Table 60.3 in Text Table shows feed per tooth for roughing cuts – for finishing cut, the feed per tooth would be reduced to1/2 or even 1/3 of value shown

Ideal Rate of Feed:

13 Ideal Rate of Feed Work advances into cutter, each successive tooth advances into work equal amount Produces chips of equal thickness Feed per tooth F = no. of cutter teeth x feed/tooth x cutter r/min Feed (in./min) = N x CPT x r/min

Feed Calculations:

14 Feed Calculations Inch Calculations Find the feed in inches per minute using a 3.5 in. diameter, 12 tooth helical cutter to cut machine steel (CS80) First, calculate proper r/min for cutter: Feed(in/min) = N x CPT x r/min =12 x .010 x 91 = 10.9 or 11 in/min

Feed Calculations:

15 Feed Calculations Metric Calculations Calculate the feed in millimeters per minute for a 75-mm diameter, six-tooth helical carbide milling cutter when machining cast-iron (CS 60) First, calculate proper r/min for cutter: Feed(in/min) = N x CPT x r/min = 6 x .025 x 256 = 384 mm/min

Direction of Feed: Conventional:

16 Direction of Feed: Conventional Most common method is to feed work against rotation direction of cutter

Direction of Feed: Climbing:

17 Direction of Feed: Climbing When cutter and workpiece going in same direction Machine equipped with backlash eliminator can increase cutter life up to 50%

Advantages of Climb Milling:

18 Advantages of Climb Milling Increased tool life (up to 50%) Chips pile up behind or to left of cutter Less costly fixtures required Forces workpiece down so simpler holding devices required Improved surface finishes Chips less likely to be carried into workpiece

Advantages of Climb Milling:

19 Advantages of Climb Milling Less edge breakout Thickness of chip tends to get smaller as nears edge of workpiece, less chance of breaking Easier chip removal Chips fall behind cutter Lower power requirements Cutter with higher rake angle can be used so approximately 20% less power required

Disadvantages of Climb Milling:

20 Disadvantages of Climb Milling Method cannot be used unless machine has backlash eliminator and table gibs tightened Cannot be used for machining castings or hot-rolled steel Hard outer scale will damage cutter

Depth of Cut:

21 Depth of Cut Roughing cuts should be deep Feed heavy as the work and machine will permit May be taken with helical cutters having fewer teeth Finishing cuts should be light with finer feed Depth of cut at least .015 inch Feed should be reduced rather than cutter speeded up

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