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Do you have trouble writing good test questions? : 

Do you have trouble writing good test questions?

Do your test questions get answers like this? : 

Do your test questions get answers like this?

Are your students confused by your test questions? : 

Are your students confused by your test questions?

Avoid sarcastic answers and confusion by writing solid multiple choice questions. : 

Avoid sarcastic answers and confusion by writing solid multiple choice questions.

Our workshop will teach you how to write multiple choice questions that will save you time without sacrificing quality. : 

Our workshop will teach you how to write multiple choice questions that will save you time without sacrificing quality.

Our workshop is based on the highly-regarded work by these scholars that have worked tirelessly to find a sure fire way to reduce the time needed to construct effective multiple-choice tests: : 

Our workshop is based on the highly-regarded work by these scholars that have worked tirelessly to find a sure fire way to reduce the time needed to construct effective multiple-choice tests: Barrett Brewer Crehan Downing Frary Froman Haladyna Kehoe Owen AND MANY MORE!! Popham Rodriguez Sidick Trevisan Tversky

A few things to consider… : 

A few things to consider… Multiple choice questions typically have 3 parts: A stem (or the question), the correct answer (often called “the key”), and several wrong answers, called distractors. The ideal question will be answered by 60-65% of the tested population.

First off, we will teach you how to write good test item stems. : 

First off, we will teach you how to write good test item stems.

Slide 18: 

Research concludes that teacher-made multiple-choice items’ stems are often wrought with unnecessary obstacles. Wow! Look at all those overlooked obstacles!

Slide 19: 

These obstacles make it difficult for teachers to find out what a student knows through testing. what a student knows unnecessary obstacles in test

Slide 20: 

For example, many well-meaning multiple-choice stems have issues for the average student such as those exaggerated in the following stem: student well- intentioned teacher

Slide 21: 

1. The metaphysical migratory pattern of theatrical verisimilitudes do not always avoid… “options” will appear momentarily…

Slide 22: 

1. The metaphysical migratory pattern of theatrical verisimilitudes do not always avoid… you probably noticed the vocabulary obstacle.

Slide 23: 

you probably noticed the vocabulary obstacle. B. but did you also find at least three other unnecessary obstacles in the stem? 1. The metaphysical migratory pattern of theatrical verisimilitudes do not always avoid…

Slide 24: 

you probably noticed the vocabulary obstacle. B. but did you also find at least three other unnecessary obstacles in the stem? C. most teachers’ multiple-choice mistakes are more subtle, but cause students to miss a question despite their knowing the information that is tested. 1. The metaphysical migratory pattern of theatrical verisimilitudes do not always avoid…

Slide 25: 

you probably noticed the vocabulary obstacle. B. but did you also find at least three other unnecessary obstacles in the stem? C. most teachers’ multiple-choice mistakes are more subtle, but cause students to miss a question despite their knowing the information that is tested. D. our six easy-to-remember guidelines for writing a stem will produce an improvement that is guaranteed to produce higher student scores on state tests. 1. The metaphysical migratory pattern of theatrical verisimilitudes do not always avoid…

We will also teach you how to quickly write effective answer choices and distractors for your item stems. : 

We will also teach you how to quickly write effective answer choices and distractors for your item stems.

Three Answer Choices in Multiple Choice Items : 

Three Answer Choices in Multiple Choice Items In fact, over 80 years of research confirms that three answer options is the optimum number on multiple choice items. Benefits of Three Answer Choices -save time by avoiding construction of useless distractors -cut time of administration -cover more content on tests in the same amount of time -save time grading

Three Answer Choices in Multiple Choice Items : 

Three Answer Choices in Multiple Choice Items Are three answer choices sufficient? Sidick and Barret (1994) summarize the time-saving benefits by stating “the use of three-altenative multiple choice tests can reduce test development and administration time with negligible effects on psychometric quality” (p. 835). Trevisan and Sax (1991) determine that “by including more items having three options, increased reliability can be expected” (p. 6). Tversky (1964) showed that given a fixed number of answer options, using three options per item actually maximized the discriminability of the test.

Keep the number of options consistent : 

Keep the number of options consistent Making the number of options consistent from question to question helps learners know what to expect So if you go with “3”, stick with it throughout the entire multiple-choice section. No need to make students even more confused!

Do you use “none of the above” options on your tests?Find out why “none of the above” options should be used with caution. : 

Do you use “none of the above” options on your tests?Find out why “none of the above” options should be used with caution.

Did you know? : 

Did you know? Students are less likely to accept “none of the above” answer choices as correct even when it is the appropriate response (Odegard and Koen, 2007). This can lead to a negative effect on initial test scores. “None of the Above” options are the easiest choices for students to eliminate because once a single plausible answer choice has been identified, “none of the above” is automatically ruled out.

We will also teach you how to develop exceptional answer choicesComing up with the questions to a multiple-choice test = No problem!Coming up with answer choices to a multiple-choice test = YIKES! : 

We will also teach you how to develop exceptional answer choicesComing up with the questions to a multiple-choice test = No problem!Coming up with answer choices to a multiple-choice test = YIKES!

The following highlights a few rules from our workshop when it comes to writing remarkable answer choices... : 

The following highlights a few rules from our workshop when it comes to writing remarkable answer choices...

Rule #1: Keep all answer choices similar in length : 

Rule #1: Keep all answer choices similar in length Most correct answers are usually made longer than incorrect choices by accident Avoid this calamity by keeping ALL answer choices similar in length OR really trick the students and make one of the incorrect answer choices much longer than the others. Immoral? Possibly.

Rule #2: Order answer choices in a vertical format : 

Rule #2: Order answer choices in a vertical format Having a vertical format for multiple choice items makes it easier to read for students as it’s what they are most used to Vertical grouping will also give them a preview of the question format they will see on the all-sacred End of Grade test

Rule #3: Balance where correct answers are placed : 

Rule #3: Balance where correct answers are placed Studies show that most teachers put their correct answers as either the 2nd or 3rd option Try to position the correct option so that it appears about the same number of times on an assessment

Rule #4: Avoid extreme words like “always”, “only”, and “never” in answer choices : 

Rule #4: Avoid extreme words like “always”, “only”, and “never” in answer choices Most students know there are no “absolutes” in the world (Popham, 2006) So if presented with an answer choice containing one of these “extreme words”, more than likely they will know it’s not the correct answer You don’t want to go too easy on them, do you now?

Rule #5: Make sure the grammar and syntax in the stem and options are the same. : 

Rule #5: Make sure the grammar and syntax in the stem and options are the same. There are certain item-writing mistakes that will just give away the correct answer. Observe the following: Bad: The fruit William Tell shot from his son’s head was an: Apple Banana Lemon Pear Much better: Which of the following fruits did William Tell shoot from his son’s head? Apple Banana Lemon Pear (Popham, 2006)

Rule #6: Use only reasonable distractors : 

Rule #6: Use only reasonable distractors Make sure your distractors are homogenous in content For example, if three answer choices deal with ancient Egypt, don’t make the fourth one about modern India And even though they might get a chuckle from your students, try to avoid throwing in those give-away distractors as it takes away from the test’s overall validity.

STILL can’t think of any good “distractors”? : 

STILL can’t think of any good “distractors”?

No Problem! : 

No Problem! Try using common student misconceptions as distractors. For example, use incorrect answers by past students on a short answer version of the same item to create distractors

Workshop Wrap-up : 

Workshop Wrap-up These rules and strategies are just the tip of the iceberg. In our workshop we will delve much deeper into the fine art of multiple-choice test writing. We will help you develop the PERFECT, most INCREDIBLE multiple-choice test the world has ever seen. We’re just a phone call away. Give us a call at: (555) PLEASE-GIVE-US-AN-A-DR. OLSEN OR, if that doesn’t work, try this easier number instead: (555) 555-TEST

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