Architecture in the Middle East

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Architecture in the Middle East

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Architecture in the Middle East Dr. Yasser Mahgoub

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The Middle East: Presumptions and Preconceptions

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Questions  What is the Middle East geography history economy politics society culture …  What is the state of architecture in the Middle East  What are the forces that influenced and are influencing architecture in the Middle East economy globalization politics identity …  Who were and are its important architects in the Middle East  What is the impact of globalization on the future architecture in the Middle East

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Themes  Ethnic vs. Religion vs. Geography vs. History vs. …  Traditional vs. Contemporary  Global  Regional  City  Urban  Architecture  Globalization vs. Localization  Global + Local “Glocal”  Colonialism vs. Independence  Identity: Individuality vs. Collectivity  Imitation vs. Authentication  Formal vs. Informal

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Books ►Planning Middle Eastern Cities: An Urban Kaledioscope in a Globalizing World ►Editor - Yasser Elsheshtawy ►Publisher: Routledge 10/30/2004 ►The Evolving Arab City: Tradition Modernity and Urban Development ►Editor - Yasser Elsheshtawy ►Publisher: Routledge 27/05/2008

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Books ►Contemporary Architecture in the Arab States: Renaissance of a Region ►by Udo Kultermann ►Publisher: McGraw-Hill 1999 ►Al Manakh ►by Rem Koolhaas Editor Ole Bouman Editor Mark Wigley Editor ►Publisher: Columbia University GSAPP / Archis September 1 2007

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Definitions The Middle East North

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Definitions The Middle East ► The Middle East is a subcontinent with no clear boundaries often used as a synonym to Near East in opposition to Far East.

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Definitions The Middle East ► The term "Middle East" was popularized around 1900 in the United Kingdom it has a loose definition traditionally encompassing countries or regions in Western Asia and parts of North Africa.

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Far East Middle East Near East North Africa Europe Asia UK South East Asia India Africa North America South America

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Definitions The Middle East Middle East Near East Far East

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Definitions The Middle East Arabian Peninsula North Africa Iraq Persian Plateau The Levant Sub-Saharan Africa Europe Horn of Africa

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The Middle East Geography - Territories and regions 1. North: Turkey Lebanon Syria Jordan Palestinian Authority and Israel 2. East: Persian Plateau - Iran Iraq Afghanistan and Pakistan 3. South: Arabian Peninsula - Saudi Arabia Kuwait Qatar U.A.E. Oman Yemen and Bahrain 4. West: North Africa - Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco and Tunisia

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Definitions The Middle East North

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Definitions The Middle East Middle North

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Definitions The Middle East

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Definitions The Middle East

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Definitions The Middle East Muslim Expansion until A.D. 661

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Definitions The Middle East The Umayyad Empire A.D.750

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Definitions The Middle East The Late Abbasid Caliphate A.D.900

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Definitions The Middle East Almoravid Saldjuk and Ghaznavid Expansion A.D. 1100

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Definitions The Middle East The Muslim World A.D. 1300

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Definitions The Middle East The Muslim World A.D. 1500

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Definitions The Middle East Confllict Oil Straits Traffic

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The Middle East The Middle East

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Definitions The Middle East Confllict Oil Straits Traffic Unrest

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The Middle East Geography

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The Middle East History

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The Middle East Traditional Architecture

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The Middle East Contemporary

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Architecture in the Middle East Mecca Saudi Arabia

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Architecture in the Middle East Beirut Lebanon

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Architecture in the Middle East Tehran Iran

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Architecture in the Middle East Jeddah Saudi Arabia

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Architecture in the Middle East Riyadh Saudi Arabia

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Architecture in the Middle East Cairo Egypt

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Architecture in the Middle East Dubai UAE

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Architecture in the Middle East Abu Dhabu UAE

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Architecture in the Middle East Kuwait

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The Middle East – 2007 Statistics Country Area km² Population Density per km² Capital GDP Total Per capita Persian Plateau: Iran 1648195 71208000 42 Tehran 753 billion 2007 10600 2007 Iraq 437072 24001816 55 Baghdad 102.3 billion 2007 3600 2007 Arabian Peninsula: Kuwait 17820 3100000 119 Kuwait City 130.1 billion 2007 39300 2007 Bahrain 665 656397 987 Manama 24.5 billion 2007 32100 2007 Oman 212460 3200000 13 Muscat 61.6 billion 2007 24000 2007 Qatar 11437 793341 69 Doha 57.7 billion 2007 80900 2007 Saudi Arabia 1960582 23513330 12 Riyadh 564.6 billion 2007 23200 2007 United Arab Emirates 82880 4496000 30 Abu Dhabi 167.3 billion 2007 37300 2007 Yemen 527970 18701257 35 Sanaá 52 billion 2007 2300 2007 The Levant: Israel 20770 7029529 290 Jerusalem1 185.9 billion 2007 25800 2007 Jordan 92300 5307470 58 Amman 28 billion 2007 4900 2007 Lebanon 10452 3677780 354 Beirut 42.3 billion 2007 11300 2007 Syria 185180 17155814 93 Damascus 87 billion 2007 4500 2007 North Africa: Algeria 2381740 33333216 14 Algiers 224.7 billion 2007 6500 2007 Egypt 1001449 77498000 74 Cairo 404 billion 2007 5500 2007 Libya 1759540 6036914 3 Tripoli 74.8 billion 2007 12300 2007 Morocco 446550 33757175 70 Rabat 125.3 billion 2007 4100 2007 Tunisia 163610 10102000 62 Tunis 77 billion 2007 7500 2007 Horn of Africa: Djibouti 23200 496374 34 Djibouti 1.641 billion 2070 Eritrea 117600 4298270 37 Asmara 4.471 billion 1000 Somalia 637661 9588666 13 Mogadishu 5.26 billion 600 Sudan 2505813 39379358 14 Khartoum 107.8 billion 2007 2552 2007 Autonomous region: Palestine: Gaza Strip 360 1376289 3823 Gaza 5 billion includes West Bank 2006 1100 includes West Bank 2006 West Bank 58602 25000003 43223 Ramallah

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The Middle East - Statistics Area km² 0 200000 400000 600000 800000 1000000 1200000 1400000 1600000 1800000 2000000 2200000 2400000 2600000 2800000 Iran Iraq Kuwait Bahrain Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Yemen Israel Jordan Lebanon Syria Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Sudan Gaza Strip West Bank

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The Middle East - Statistics Population 0 10000000 20000000 30000000 40000000 50000000 60000000 70000000 80000000 90000000 Iran Iraq Kuwait Bahrain Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Yemen Israel Jordan Lebanon Syria Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Sudan Gaza Strip West Bank

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The Middle East - Statistics Density per km² 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 Iran Iraq Kuwait Bahrain Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Yemen Israel Jordan Lebanon Syria Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Sudan Gaza Strip West Bank

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The Middle East - Statistics GDP 2007 Billion 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 Iran Iraq Kuwait Bahrain Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Yemen Israel Jordan Lebanon Syria Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Sudan Gaza Strip West Bank

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The Middle East - Statistics Per capita 2007 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 80000 90000 Iran Iraq Kuwait Bahrain Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Yemen Israel Jordan Lebanon Syria Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia Djibouti Eritrea Somalia Sudan Gaza Strip West Bank

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it West vs. East Global vs. Local Non-Muslim vs. Muslim … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it West vs. East Global vs. Local Non-Muslim vs. Muslim … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it West vs. East Global vs. Local Non-Muslim vs. Muslim … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it West vs. East Global vs. Local Non-Muslim vs. Muslim … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it West vs. East Global vs. Local Non-Muslim vs. Muslim … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Is it Foreigner vs. Native Modernity vs. Traditional English vs. Arabic … or what

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The Middle East Contemporary Culture Dubai is “SOLD”

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The city as a “text”. ► “Meanings and symbols are ascribed to the physical environment and it becomes a ‘representation’ an ‘imagined environment’ construed from the particular vantage point of each observer.” Donald 1996 Ross Von Rosenberg - I am The City

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Fast Food  Instant History Merry Fuhrer - Fast Food

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Fast Food  Instant History ► This trend is exacerbated and amplified through the current universalization or globalization discourse. ► Traditional readings of the ME city:  Isolated entity  Disconnected from developments occurring elsewhere in the ‘civilized’ world.  Heritage  Tradition  Culture  Divorced from the surrounding reality.  The “ISLAMIC” perspective.

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The “ISLAMIC” perspective. ► Framework through which the “Moslem” city emerged and developed. ► Religious text. ► 1980’s and 1990’s conferences legitimized this approach. ► The revival of the “Arab” city “glory” by tying it to its cultural/religious roots.

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Orientalism ► Edward Said makes the claim that the whole of Western European and American scholarship literature and cultural representation and stereotype creates and reinforces prejudice against non-Western cultures putting them in the classification of Oriental or "Others". ► The heart of the matter in understanding Orientalism is this power relationship and how the Occident has used and continues to use and understand the Orient on its own terms. Edward Said

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A comparative perspective ► Gulf region calls for a comparative perspective both grounding urban settlements within their regional contexts and studying the ‘specificity’ of each – thus moving away from the ‘static ideal type’ of the ‘Islamic city.’ ► There is an emerging body of research which examines Gulf cities from socio-political perspective showing that the urban forms developed in response to unique contemporary conditions.

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The Dual-city ► The Dual-city construct ► Traditional settlement and a European one ► Freezing the image of a society in time and space ► Maintaining a physical differentiation between the colonizers and the colonized

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Globalization ► Globalization and the Middle East ► Probably no area in the world resists--at least explicitly--globalization to an extent equaling that of the Islamic Middle East. ► The majority of regimes opposition movements and intellectuals in the region are consciously anti-globalization. ► How can this extremely important phenomenon be explained

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► 1- Globalization refers to the spread throughout the globe of ideas customs institutions and attitudes originated in one part of the world. At present these are usually Western in origin. ► Thus it is easy to see globalization as largely equivalent to Westernization. Nationalism comes dramatically into play when certain aspects of Westernization are seen as challenges to a nations ethos. ► Regions like North and South America Europe and Africa and even Asia to a lesser extent are more open to Westernization and globalization in part because they have considerable Western components already.

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► 2- Much of globalization is related to what historically is called modernization a set of behaviors and beliefs that challenge traditional society. ► Thus Globalization is seen as a major threat to tradition. Where religion is far more traditional in its practice the defense of religion also conflicts with the acceptance of modernization.

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► 3- The two factors that supposedly make globalization attractive are those of benefits and cultural synthesis. ► Benefits: If globalization makes life better raises living standards strengthens the society and stabilizes the existing order or helps replace it with an order its citizens deem to be better people will prefer to accept more globalization.

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► The concept of cultural synthesis means that the societys existing or traditional ways can be blended with new and foreign ideas to make a stronger hybrid. The modern history of Japan for example shows how such a synthesis can be constructed.

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► The society is also selective in choosing what it wants to accept and reject with those values or institutions most destructive of tradition being blocked.

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Globalization ► Globalization: ► Ultimately then globalization is accepted if and when it is perceived not as destroying the local society but helping it to survive and flourish in a partly new form.

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Globalization ► Globalization ► 4- Even the most extreme explicit rejection of globalization does not mean that globalization fails to infiltrate into the society. In Iran where the Islamic republic has attempted to block many foreign cultural and intellectual influences it has often not succeeded. ► These concepts have been taken up by an opposition enjoying support from a majority of the population. Leaders of this opposition notably President Muhammad Khatami explicitly speak of the need for cultural synthesis while suggesting that globalization is a two-way street and the West can also learn from their society.

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Globalization ► Arab cities have been part of modernization efforts from the nineteenth century to the present. ► While being subjected to colonialism they nevertheless were able to grow develop and contribute to architecture/urban design. ► Urban forms unique to each city were developed responding to larger ‘global’ issues.  Ex. Ebenezer Howard “Garden City” – Cairo Kuwait  French architecture – Tunis

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Globalization ► The exclusive “Islamic” reading of such cities is outdated and counterproductive. ► Heritage and culture are visual issues but they should not be the sole or dominant factors through which the middle Eastern city is studied and analyzed.

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Globalization ► Existing literature tends to simplify the trends in the ME city by having a very string historical focus. AlSayyad 1991 Basim Hakim 1986 Jamel Akbar 1988. ► Some scholars employed a postcolonial framework examining the impact of colonialism on ‘traditional’ societies transformations due to national movements and the construction of identities. Case studies specific events buildings …

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Globalization ► Janet Abu-Lughod ► Abu-Lughod was one of the first to criticize the ‘monolithic Islamic city model’ finding great similarities between this model and cities in medieval Europe and arguing that similar economic factors led to specific city forms. Abu-Lughod 199 Janet Abu-Lughod

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Globalization ► Stefano Bianca ► An attempt to establish a religious basis for the urban form in the Arab world. ► 4 case studies Mecca Baghdad Fez and Aleppo.

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Globalization ► Establishing a Religious Undercurrent to the Spatial Structure of Arab-Moselm Cities is in fact a recurring theme. ► The mere notion that the Arab/Moselm could be capable of producing contemporary modern structures which do not necessarily have to be reflective of any illusive traditional concepts but are unique responses to contemporary conditions is nowhere to be found.

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Globalization ► Despite disagreement over the Islamic city model it is undeniable that Islam as a socio-religious system has had a significant impact on the morphology of cities where it predominates.” ► Linking the Religious and the Secular an attempt to ascribe to a religion some planning guidelines which were never intended to be there in the first place.

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Globalization ► A much more useful model would be to examine contemporary social political and economic factors operating at a global level and to understand the extent to which they have shaped the Middle Eastern city. ► Impact of Capitalism ► Impact of socialism ► Impact of Global economy free flow of goods people and ideas.

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Globalization Cultural Hybridity and Polarization ► Globalization Cultural Hybridity and Polarization  End of 20 th century and the beginning of 21 st century  Loss of place  Identity and character ► “Cities throughout the world are becoming shapeless entities with a haunting sameness.”  “Universalization”

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Globalization Cultural Hybridity and Polarization ► Globalization Cultural Hybridity and Polarization  Western hegemony  Edward Said “Orientalism”: Colonial discourse analysis ► “There is a ‘culture of imperialism’ in which the West is trying to superimpose its values and beliefs on the East.” Said 1979  Jane Jacobs ► “Such approach led to the creation of a new analytical language in which such constructs as ‘hybridity’ ‘diaspora’ ‘creolization’ ‘transculturation’ etc.” Jacobs 1996  Nezar AlSayyad ► “In cities throughout the world globalization led to creation of ‘third places’ in between spaces of ‘spatial reconciliation of incommensurable constructions of subcultures.” AlSayyad 2001

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Globalization Cultural Hybridity and Polarization ► Globalization does not in and of itself lead to loss of identity/heritage.  “Globalization does not signal the erasure of difference but a reconstitution and revalidation of place locality difference.” Jacobs 1996  “The history of the world demonstrates a movement toward cultural differentiation and not homogenization and urbanism will continue to be an area where one can observe the specificity of local cultures and their attempt to mediate global domination.” AlSayyad 2001

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New Trends  The relevance of the nation-state is questioned.  City governments are emerging as the new centers of the ‘new’ global economy.  Transactions between multi-national corporations financial centers and cities.

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New Trends ► New Trend  Cities are assuming a powerful role.  Cities are viewed as a “product” that needs to be marked.  Attracting headquarters or regional branches of international companies and staging of ‘mega- events’.

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New Trends ► New Trend  Luxury housing dining establishments and entertainment amenities to attract professional personnel required to operate these global activities.  Urban projects: trade centers conference centers and hotels to encourage investment and tourism.

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New Trends ► New Trend and Architecture  Architecture is used as a “tool” to create ‘eye-catching’ impressions.  The Bilbao effect: ► The Guggenheim museum in Bilbao was used to revitalize a ‘stagnant’ city.

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New Trends ► The “dual-city”  Social polarization - Saskia Sassen  Due to the presence of these high-profile projects there is an influx of a highly skilled and paid workforce.  Low-wage employees are needed who form the backbone of corporate and financial activities.

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New Trends ► Geographical/Spatial division  Areas with a high concentration of poor labor  Enclaves housing the very rich ► Resentment Social instability and conflict ► Mega projects don’t necessarily lead to happiness of the cities

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New Trends ► Visible aspect of globalizing cities is the ‘quartering of urban space”  Sharper division between rich and poor  Distinct residential cities  Protected enclaves of the rich

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New Trends ► Gated communities private high rise condominiums with heavy security ► Expensive apartments in favorable locations ► “Wall some in and keep others out.”

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New Trends ► The Middle Eastern city has strong potential for examining these issues for a variety of reasons:  Colonialism in the 18th and 19th century.  Strategies at the urban and architectural levels  Attempts were made to wipe out the past and “join” the civilized west. The case of Kuwait master plan  Modernity History was abandoned in favor of ‘embracing’ a new age.  Impact on the spatial structure of many cities in the region. Kuwait

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New Trends ► These are strong similarities to the political climate present today.  “Colonialization” has been replaced by “Globalization”  Globalization: Free flow of goods people and information  Domination: political social and cultural

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New Trends ► A paradigm shift ► A ‘New Architecture’ and ‘Urbanism’  Contemporary advances in information technology  Global communications  Technological and artistic advances at the beginning of the 21 st century revolutionized people’s sense of space and movement.

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Do Arabs still exist ► Do Arabs still exist  Doom and hopelessness  Colonialism  Symbols of Arab identity ► Negative stereotype:  Arabs not contributing to science literature and the arts.  Recipients consumers and proponents of extremist ideologies.

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Do Arabs still exist ► There is a growing conservatism sweeping the Arab world even in formerly liberal and cosmopolitan cities.

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Do Arabs still exist ► How is this related to cities ► Baghdad and Beirut: Sites of struggle and contestation ► Dubai and Doha: “New Arab Metropolis” by opening up to global capital adapting western models forms and planning models.

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Gulfication Dubaization ► There is a divide in the region between newly emerging cities and the traditional centers. ► New centers are influencing and shaping the urban form of “traditional” cities. Emaar Tunis - Cedar village

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The Struggle ► Struggle for modernity: trying to ascertain one’s place in the 21 st century. ► Determining the region’s direction.

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Global City Theory ► Exclusion discussed by:  John Friedmann  Gotez Wolff  Saski Sassen  Peter Marcuse ► Newtworking:  Cities are conceived as lying on a network  Level of connectivity Space of flows vs. Space of Places Manuel Castells

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Global City Theory ► Saki Sassen ► Impact of network infrastructure on city form. ► Fragmentary nature of contemporary urban structure.

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Global City Theory ► Marginalized Cities ► Certain cities are offered as a model to which other cities must aspire to if they are to emerge from “off the map” or otherwise be marginalized Marginalized City Global City

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A New Middle East ► “A New Middle East”

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Gulf Countries The Middle East Future Architecture

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Dubai UAE The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture Rem Koolhaas at the exhibition Dubai next

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai in 1990

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The Middle East Future Architecture The same street in 2003

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The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai is said to currently have 15-25 of all the worlds cranes.

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The Middle East Future Architecture The Dubai Waterfront. When completed it will become the largest waterfront development in the world.

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The Middle East Future Architecture the future of Dubais waterfront

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The Middle East Future Architecture The Palm Islands in Dubai. New Dutch dredging technology was used to create these massive man made islands. They are the largest artificial islands in the world and can be seen from space. Three of these Palms will be made with the last one being the largest of them all.

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The Middle East Future Architecture The World Islands. 300 artificially created islands in the shape of the world. Each island will have an estimated cost of 25-30 million.

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The Middle East Future Architecture the future of Dubais waterfront

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The Middle East Future Architecture the future of Dubais waterfront

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The Middle East Future Architecture the future of Dubais waterfront

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The ‘Burj Dubai is a supertall skyscraper currently under construction in Dubai. when completed in 2009 it will be the tallest man made structure in the world. It was designed by Adrian Smith who worked with the buildings architecture and engineering firm Skidmore Owings and Merrill until 2006. On September 12 2007 it passed Torontos CN tower to become the worlds tallest freestanding structure. The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture burj Dubai

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The Middle East Future Architecture burj Dubai

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The Middle East Future Architecture burj Dubai

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubailand. Currently the largest amusement park collection in the world is Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando which is also the largest single-site employer in the United states with 58000 employees. Dubailand will be twice the size.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubailand. Currently the largest amusement park collection in the world is Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando which is also the largest single-site employer in the United states with 58000 employees. Dubailand will be twice the size. Dubailand

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Zaha Hadid dancing towers are planned to be located in Dubais business bay development area. The plan consists of three buildings which rise up from the ground bending and intertwining with each other to create fluid animation of the forms. The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - Zaha Hadid dancing towers

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opus is another Dubai building designed by British architect Zaha Hadid. The 235 million GBP development was designed for the business bay for Omniyat properties. It stands at 20 stories located next to the towering burj Dubai. Hadids concept was to have the building open onto the city framing the views. It is currently underdevelopment and is planned to be completed by 2010. The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - opus is designed by Zaha Hadid

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Dubai - dubai renaissance designed by OMA The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai renaissance was designed by architects Rem Koolhaas and Fernando Donis of OMA for the business bay development competition. Their entry lost to Hadids dancing towers.

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Dubai - dubai towers The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai towers is the centerpiece for the large lagoons development. The buildings and the development were all conceived of by TVS. The four towers range in size from 54 to 97 floors and were inspired by the flames and movement of candlelight.

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Dubai - arabian blade The Middle East Future Architecture The Arabian blade is a mixed-use tower designed by Claudio Catalano. The building was inspired by plant forms and combines several volumes into one unit. It will contain residences a hotel and commercial space.

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Dubai – ‘grand pyramid The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai grand pyramid obviously derives its form from the Egyptian pyramids with a modern twist. This pyramid will be a multi-use space and will be flanked by two smaller pyramids housing the developer Falconcitys offices and commercial space for a theme park.

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Dubai - da vinci rotating tower The Middle East Future Architecture Architect David Fisher is the designer of the da vinci rotating tower one of the most innovative an unique buildings to be built in Dubai. The 250 meter tower will allow each floor to rotate freely allowing the building to shift its shape. In between each floor horizontal wind turbines will allow the building to produce energy.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - Jebel Ali Royal Haskoning architects were invited by Nakeel development to create a master plan design for pal Jebel Ali off the coast of Dubai. Their winning design includes sports facilities housing retail and office space. The design also features an iconic bridge connecting to the main towers.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - tameer towers ‘Tameer towers was proposed as a sustainable skyscraper designed by Gensler architects. The development will include six 72 story towers with a diamond shaped base. Set to be complete in 2011 the towers will be shaded by a series of landscaped terraces. inside apartments hotels shops and office will fill p the space.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - the burj al alam ‘The Burj Al Alam or world tower is a 108 story 501 meter high skyscraper currently being constructed in Dubais business bay area. Designed by Nihon architects the buildings form is based on the form of a flower. when complete it will be among the tallest building in the world. The top of the building will be finished with a 6 story Turkish bath and sky garden when construction is completed in 2010.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - Hydropolis - underwater resort Hydropolis is a company who produces underwater resorts in places all over the world including Dubai. its 220 suites will sit 66 feet below the Persian gulf. Cost issues and concerns over the projects environmental impact have halted the project which was originally expected to be completed this year.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - the apeiron hotel ‘The apeiron hotel will be a 7-star hotel built on an island off of Dubai. The arched 185 meter tall hotel will cost 500 million USD. It will have 350 luxury suites that will only be accessible by yacht and helicopter. Designed by sybarite-uk the hotel features its own lagoon beaches cinemas and at gallery.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai - the palm tower jumeirah village ‘The palm tower is as its name implies inspired by the trunk of a palm tree. It is located in the center of Jumeirah village. It measures 150 meters tall holding offices retail space and gardens. Designed by sybarite-uk it contains 60000 square meters of interior space.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Rem Koolhaass OMA architects porsche towers in dubais Rem Koolhaass OMA architects collaborated with Porsche design to create the Porsche towers in Dubais business bay. The two building complex features a cylindrical tower and a hallow slab which is glassed in the center. The project is currently under construction.

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The Middle East Future Architecture the cloud is a speculative design for a resort city elevated 300 meters in the air above Dubai and supported on slanting legs resembling rain. it is designed by Nadim Karam of Lebanese architect atelier hapsitus. it is a horizontal presence on an elevated platform an antithesis to the sum of skyscrapers spreading over the entire region.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai hub one is a design proposal for a cultural hub serving the UAE. Designed by studio nova the space has been created to work in much the same way as a shopping mall except for the consumption of culture instead of goods. Its forms have been generated using algorithms and special programming scripts creating a dense structure of spaces.

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The Middle East Future Architecture 0-14 tower was designed by Resier and Umemoto and Rur architecture pc along with Dubai developer Shahab Lutfi. The building was designed for Dubais business bay and features 22 floors covered in a double skin facade thats outermost skin is constructed from 40c thick perforated concrete. the one meter space between the skins creates a chimney effect cooling the building. Dubai - 0-14 tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture The Al Burj. This will be the centerpiece of the Dubai Waterfront. Once completed it will take over the title of the tallest structure in the world from the Burj Dubai. Dubai - Al Burj

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The Middle East Future Architecture Adrian Smith and Gordon Gills 2.4 kilometers tall Dubai City Tower. Dubai - City Tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture This art deco inspired building will house a hotel and residences. the burj Dubai lake hotel stands at 306 meters next to the Dubai mall and the burj Dubai lake.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Named the G tower this building was designed by YOO a design company owned by Philippe Stark and john Hitchcox. Its geometric and grid-like exterior is set to be complete this summer. It is located in the city of Arabia just outside Dubai. Dubai - G tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture Madrids a-cero architects led by Joaquin Torres has designed a new tower for the city of Dubai. ‘The wave tower is a high-rise proposed to be installed on the citys waterfront the first skyscraper to do so. The tall tower which appears to float in the sea is connected to land by a gently curved bridge which mimics the waves of the gulf sea. The building is under development and will be in the Madiant al Arab district. It will stand at 370 meters and have 92 floors wrapped in a double skin glass facade. Dubai - the wave tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture the pixel tower by light architecture is on the palm jebel ali overlooking the lagoon and bay. The buildings twisted core gives it a light and flexible appearance. The 45 degree twist allows the uppermost apartments to have optimal views despite the buildings footprint. Dubai - the pixel tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture Real Estate mogul Donald Trump is also part of the architectural plans of Dubai along with Nakheel hotels he plans to build a 255 meter trump hotel on a man-made island in Dubai. With 60 stories the 5 star hotel will also house some luxury apartments. the building has been designed by Atkins architects. Dubai - trump hotel

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The Middle East Future Architecture the infinity tower is designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill and is located directly on Dubais waterfront. When complete it will be the worlds tallest tower to feature a 90-degree twist. It will be used for luxury apartments and services with all sides of the building featuring optimal views. The buildings interior structure will feature a concrete column shaped like a helix. each floor has a slight 1.2 degree twist to compose the full 90 degrees. Dubai - the infinity tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture Dubai promenade is another project developed by Nakheel. located in between Dubai marina and palm Jumeirah this wheel shaped five star hotel is built on a man-made peninsula. it will be accompanied by a series of sister towers that will create 2000 residential units. Dubai - Dubai promenade

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The Middle East Future Architecture ‘The Oval Tower is located in the business bay area and features 19 floors of office space and a luxury deck with a gym. Divided into the tower and the podium the project also holds retail space. It is designed by Atkins architects. Dubai - ‘The Oval Tower

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The Middle East Future Architecture ‘Ocean Heights is another tower located at Dubai marina. it measures 310 meters tall and contains 82 floors. Each side is twisted to maximize the views over the water when the building is completed this year. Dubai - ‘Ocean Heights

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The Middle East Future Architecture ‘Tijara United is a pair of office tower located near the financial district in Dubai. Its multi-colored facade features branch like structural components. The two buildings are joined at the base with a glass atrium. Dubai - ‘Tijara United

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The Middle East Future Architecture ‘Synergy is another building designed by Indias Sanjay Puri for Dubais business bay area. The 20-story building was designed to appear like a stack of cubes that were fluidly merged. One side overlooks the promenade in front while the other side faces a lake. The facade is punctured by a decorative motif derived from Islamic art.

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The Middle East Future Architecture ‘The Emaar towers are located at the entry point to the Burj Dubai development right across from the Burj Dubai tower. The towers are 42 and 34 stories each and will mostly house offices. An articulated skin covers the buildings and recalls the layers of traditional Islamic architecture.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Inspired by the Q1 the worlds tallest residential tower the D1 tower is designed by Sunland architects. It combines middle eastern tradition with modern technology. It measures 284 meter tall with 80 stories located on Dubai creek cultural and artistic district.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Atkins architects also designed the lighthouse a new tower located in the middle of Dubais financial center. The 400 meter tall office tower which hopes to set a new standard for sustainability among Dubais towers. It plans to reduce its total energy consumption by 65 and its water consumption by up to 40.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Architectural model of the Dubai opera house by Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher. ‘The only opera house in the entire middle east Dubai opera house is set on its own creek in the seven pearls district of the architecture hotbed that is Dubai. The landmark will encompass an auditorium with room for 2500 people a 5000m2 art gallery an 800-seat playhouse a performing arts school and a hotel.

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The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture Jean Nouvel submitted this proposal for the Dubai opera house. The futuristic building is meant to differentiate itself from the vulgar hotels and office buildings of Dubai. Its design resembles a cliff face or a waterfall and is capped with a giant dome featuring a semi- permeable skin. Dubai - opera house

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July 14 2008 DUBIOTECH: New Largest Green Building in Dubai The new headquarters of Dubiotech is set to be one of the world’s largest green buildings. The LEED certified 22-story headquarters and laboratory buildings will be home to the center of excellence for biotechnology education and research with two connected buildings oriented to maximize day-lighting and views while minimizing solar gain. It will also integrate a 500000 sq ft animal reserve for indigenous conservation and wildlife protection. The design comes form design firm CUH2A and is scheduled for completion in 2009. Conceptually the architecture represents DNA migration in an agarose gel as seen during electrophoresis. Electrophoresis is the movement of charged molecules under the influence of electric current. This truly reflects the kind of research that will be conducted in the laboratories of DuBiotech and what this park is all about. The 60000 sq ft headquarters designed by CUH2A the firm renowned for designing of facilities for science and technology institutions won the Design and Sustainability Honour Award from the American Institute of Architects AIA New Jersey Chapter. Dr. Abdulqader Alkhayat Executive Director of DuBiotech said “DuBiotech’s initiative to develop sustainable buildings matches its commitment to be a socially and environmentally responsible organization.” The DuBiotech park set up under the Dubai Technology and Media Free Zone Authority would be built on an area of 300-hectare with an estimated cost of about Dh130 million for the infrastructure and Dh600 million for the lab and headquarters buildings. Dubiotech works with the objectives of nurturing biotechnology education encouraging innovation offering state-of-the-art infrastructural facilities both to the academia and industry and would consist of biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry drug manufacturers and suppliers. In order to broaden the horizons of biotechnology in the UAE it would be partnering in addition to industries with universities medical institutions and other biotechnology parks. It is expected to create some 20000 jobs.

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July 14 2008 O-14 GREEN DUBAI TOWER Form truly follows function when it comes to the façade of the lean green O-14 pronounced “oh-14″ office tower which broke ground this December 2006 in Dubai. At 22 stories tall the 300000 square-foot commercial tower’s most unique feature is its façade which is made of 16″ thick concrete containing over 1000 circular openings. Designed by RUR Architecture the building’s façade perforations serve as a solar screen letting in light air and views through to the interior occupants. The one-meter space between the façade and the building’s glass surface also yields a chimney effect causing hot air to rise creating an efficient passive cooling system. The façade also serves as a structural exoskeleton absorbing all of the tower’s lateral forces and acting as a physical barrier for the building’s window wall. The Architects Jesse Reiser and Nanoko Umemoto of RUR Architecture designed O-14 in collaboration with developer Shahab Lutfi. The result was a fruitful relationship between developer and architect- both Reiser and Umemoto comment on the significance of their working relationship with Lutfi with particular regard to his outlook and enthusiasm for innovative architecture. Dubai is fast becoming the global leader of bizarre upscale developments — for more interesting Dubai architecture check out the rotating solar tower and the floating mosque and floating communities which are currently being developed.

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July 14 2008 Rotating Wind Power Tower to begin construction in Dubai Dubai has garnered much attention in recent years with a never-ending supply of architectural wonders being built or proposed at a head spinning pace. Mostly these towering structures are grand and tall but some are also green. David Fisher’s Rotating Tower self-sufficient sun and wind powered design is making headlines once again as the Italian-Israeli architect has just unveiled the latest design for his twirling tower and construction is set to begin this month The Dynamic Architecture building has been aptly named Rotating Tower as the floors would be capable of rotating around a central axis. It will be continually in motion changing shape and giving residents the ability to choose a new view at the touch of a button. The form of the building would constantly change as each floor rotates separately giving a new view of the building as it turns. According to Fisher the building ensures a very high resistance to earthquakes as each floor rotates independently. The new tower is the first building of its size to produced in a factory. Each floor made up of 12 individual units complete with plumbing electric connections air conditioning etc. will be fabricated in a factory. These modular units will be fitted on the concrete core or spine of the building at the central tower. The 59-floor building will be powered entirely by sun and wind energy. And the architect claims that the building will generate 10 times more energy than required to power it thus making it a positive energy building. Solar panels will be fitted on the roof to harness sunlight and a total of 48 wind turbines will be sandwiched between the rotating floors placed so that they are practically invisible. Each wind turbine could produce up to 0.3 megawatt of electricity and it is estimated that 1200000 kilowatt-hours of energy would be generated every year. Construction is going to start soon with an official launch later this month and plans are also afoot to build a similar tower in Moscow.

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July 14 2008 CELEBUTECTURE: Brad Pitt to design 5-star Eco Hotel in Dubai Brad Pitt is once again trading the silver screen for green building as he recently announced a collaboration with LA-based architecture firm GRAFT to design a 5-star “green resort” in Dubai. We’re not sure if “Dubai” and “green” really belong in the same sentence and we’re also skeptical about the project oxymoronically being called both “socially-conscious” and “an 800-room luxury hotel and adjoining leisure complex” but we’ll wait to see how it unfolds. No details or location have been announced yet but we can only hope that given Brad’s friendship with Frank Gehry and his commitment to Global Green it’ll be as beautiful and green as the superstar claims. The undeniably handsome star has an ongoing interest in architecture helping to rebuild 150 homes after Hurricane Katrina and collaborating with friend Frank Gehry from time to time. The face of Global Green Brad has also committed to building green so we’re curious to see how the Dubai project follows his values. The hotel was announced by developers Zabeel Properties on Monday. Between the upcoming birth of his and Angie’s twins and all the design charrettes in his future we’re guessing Mr. Pitt won’t be getting much sleep any time soon.

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July 24 2008 Dubai Museum Dubai United Arab Emirates UNStudio create futuristic design for first Dubai Museum of Middle East Modern Art Dubai is set to embark on a cultural journey as the realisation of UN Studios Museum of Middle East Modern Art begins the Ruler of Dubai Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum announced this week. It will be the first museum of its kind in Dubai and will be located on the banks of Khor Dubai in Culture Village. The futuristic elegant form created by UN Studios design is sleek and bold in its massing leaning over passers-by as though it were the bow of an enormous ship. Dubai Properties Group are to develop the Museums design which was commissioned by His Highness Sheik Mohammed following the establishment of the Dubai Culture and Arts Authority and the launch of Khor Dubai which is designed to celebrate cultural diversity in the UAE. In addition to the Museum the UAD 50 billion Culture Village will hold 40 million sq ft of land and will include an amphitheatre an exhibition hall and smaller museums.

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The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi UAE The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi – Aldar Central Market 2006- Foster + Partners Co-architects: Planar The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi – Aldar Central Market 2006- Foster + Partners Co-architects: Planar The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi – Aldar Central Market 2006- Foster + Partners Co-architects: Planar The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi – ‘convention centre’ The Middle East Future Architecture RMJM architects have designed this building for Abu Dhabi convention centre. The structure features an organically shaped office tower which blends seamlessly into the horizontal convention space below.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - stellar tower The 255 meter stellar tower was designed by London-based architects Make. It was commissioned to Honour the late Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan. Located on Ittihad square the building features a geometric dress shaped exterior which will house offices a hotel and commercial space.

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The Middle East Future Architecture the REEM media building is also designed by light architecture and is located in Abu Dhabi. it was designed to reflect traditional arab architecture focusing around the patio and pool. the facade features an immense 34 by 9 meter projection screen which can be seen from the citys coastline. the building is also able to be dismantled and reconstructed on another site. Abu Dhabi - the REEM media building

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Ultra-Green Abu Dhabi Project Desert buildings that produce more energy than they consume may no longer be the stuff of mirages. Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture recently won a competition to design Masdar Headquarters a 1.6-million-square-foot zero-waste zero-carbon facility that it predicts will generate not only enough power to run itself but also surplus energy to help fuel buildings surrounding it. Masdar is Abu Dhabi’s multi-billion dollar initiative to further the development and commercialization of sustainable energy. The headquarters building will be the heart of Masdar City a 2.3-square-mile city masterplanned by Foster + Partners just outside Abu Dhabi. Smith and Gill’s design features a sprawling canopy lined with photovoltaics resting on 11 massive glass hyperboloids. Underneath the canopy a series of interconnected volumes topped by green roofs provide space for offices retail stores and residences. The hyperboloids serve as cooling chimneys that exhaust warm air while also creating interior courtyards with water gardens they are sculpted to bring diffuse daylight into the facility and prevent the glare of direct sunlight. The design even aims to reduce energy consumption during construction. “It was designed so that the canopy photovoltaic roof and cooling tower structures could all go in first and shade the workers while the they’re building the rest of it” says Smith noting that they will use energy from the photovoltaics for construction. “Our philosophy is to really understand the way that buildings are made” adds Gill. “We’re looking closely at the construction process and anything that we can do from a sustainable standpoint to help that process we’ll work into the concept and design of the building.”

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The Masdar Initiative: Going Green in the UAE In 2006 Abu Dhabi launched the Masdar Initiative a 15bn project that seeks to “embrace renewable and sustainable energy technologies.” One of the ways that Masdar Initiative hopes to do this largely through the construction of Masdar City a zero- emissions zero-carbon zero-waste city with a target population of 50000. According to VentureBeat: Although much of that money will go toward construction and infrastructure requirements Masdar is also becoming a significant force in fostering new technologies. The Masdar Clean Tech Fund has already sunk 250 million into cleantech ventures from its first fund and is in the process of raising more capital for a second. The investment dollars are going in large part to ideas for energy generation. The planned power supply of Masdar is to be split between several sources with solar providing the majority a 500 megawatt solar thermal installation a 100MW solar concentrator project which funding has not yet been announced for are in the works. Research is going into thin film and the city will play host to a solar photovoltaic manufacturing plant. However another 500MW will come from a plant fueled by hydrogen Al Jaber said in his speech. The new city will provide a rare opportunity to test out utility-scale use of hydrogen which is estimated to be decades away in this country. The initiative has also launched an eponymous Masdar Clean Tech Fund that seeks to invest 250mm.

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The Masdar Initiative: Going Green in the UAE

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The Masdar Initiative: Ultra-Green Abu Dhabi Project

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The Masdar Initiative: Ultra-Green Abu Dhabi Project

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Abu Dhabi – Saadiyat Island The Middle East Future Architecture An island sanctuary off the coast of Abu Dhabi Saadiyat which translates as ‘island of happiness’ is one of TDICs flagship developments. Occupying 27 square kilometres the entire project is due for completion by 2018 and is created around an eco- sensitive philosophy with a special low density masterplan. A premier island destination as well as a modern integrated residential community Saadiyat will eventually be home to an estimated 160000 residents with a full complement of leisure and tourism facilities as well as civic and cultural amenities.

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Abu Dhabi – Saadiyat Island The Middle East Future Architecture

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Abu Dhabi – Saadiyat Island The Middle East Future Architecture

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE FIFTY years ago this modest slice of the Persian Gulf coast was a sleepy settlement of palm-front huts and Bedouin encampments its few thousand inhabitants mostly subsisting on fishing and the pearl- diving trade. Oil changed all that of course and since the 1960s Abu Dhabi has morphed into a modern capital of hotels and high rises fulfilling the economic vision of the United Arab Emirates’ ambitious former leader Sheik Zayed bin Sultan al-Nahayan. Now the city is on the verge of another audacious leap. Over the next decade or so it aims to become one of the great cultural centers of the Middle East: the heir in its way to cosmopolitan cities of old like Beirut Cairo and Baghdad. This latter-day Xanadu as envisioned in a glittering multimillion-dollar exhibition in the lobby of the opulent Emirates Palace Hotel here would boast four museums a performing arts center and 19 art pavilions designed by celebrated architects like Frank Gehry Zaha Hadid and Jean Nouvel. The development could include leading cultural lights of the West from the Guggenheim to the Louvre to Yale University. Planned for a 670-acre cultural district in Abu Dhabi: Above from left a Guggenheim Museum by Frank Gehry a classical museum by Jean Nouvel a performing arts center by Zaha Hadid a maritime museum by Tadao Ando. Also envisioned are a national museum and 19 arts pavilions bordering a canal.

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE Just one component of a 27 billion residential office and hotel development planned for Saadiyat Island Island of Happiness the 670-acre cultural district is still in the nascent stages. Most of the major cultural institutions have yet to sign on officially and the Guggenheim for one is well known for chasing unrealized dreams. Some will dismiss this kingdom of culture as a mere tourist development in which art history and regional identity are reduced to marketing commodities. But those who view it as an exercise in global branding or as a feel-good story about an Arab country willing to embrace the values of Western modernity are missing the point. With once-proud cities like Beirut and Baghdad ripped apart by political conflict bordering on civil war Abu Dhabi offers the hope of a major realignment a chance to plant the seeds for a fertile new cultural model in the Middle East. It’s easy to be skeptical. But judging by the designs released so far the buildings promise to be more than aesthetic experiments outlining a vision of cross- cultural pollination.

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Abu Dhabi – Saadiyat Island The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture In addition to the proposed opera house in Dubai Jean Nouvel is also currently working on the design for the Louvre Abu Dhabi. The museums new location will be located on Saadiyat island the happiness island right next to the new branch of the Guggenheim museum. Nouvels Louvre features a giant sun shade which hangs ominously over the island. it is planned to be completed by 2012 at a cost of 83 million Euros. Louvre Abu Dhabi

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The Middle East Future Architecture Louvre Abu Dhabi

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE For Abu Dhabi’s tourist and development authority mapping out a mix of marinas and beachfront resorts seemed straightforward enough. But when it came to the cultural master plan the agency decided to call in Thomas Krens director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation known for his campaign to open a dozen Guggenheim branches in places like Singapore St. Petersburg and Rio de Janeiro few of which have been built. He began by pulling together a list of famous architectural talents. For the Guggenheim Mr. Gehry was enlisted to replicate his success in Bilbao Spain. Mr. Nouvel was offered a “classical” museum that could house visiting exhibitions from the Louvre Ms. Hadid a performing arts center and Tadao Ando a maritime museum. Each building is expected to run into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Krens worked with Skidmore Owings Merrill to revamp the original master plan adding a canal flanked by a string of 19 pavilions that could be used to present art and architecture biennials — a not-so-subtle knockoff of the highly successful Venice Biennale.

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE Meanwhile the development authority began a series of conversations with Yale University about creating an arts institute — encompassing art architecture music and drama — directly across the performing arts center. Next on the agenda is a competition to design a national museum. In some ways this array suggests the market’s insatiable appetite for novelty rather than a cohesive vision. In the early stages the various cultural institutions will rely mostly on art loans from foreign museums and performances by touring companies. For the time being Abu Dhabi has no opera company or orchestra that would use the performing arts center as a permanent home. And the exhibition at the Emirates Palace Hotel comes across as an extravagant marketing pitch to the country’s rulers who have yet to give the project final approval. A chunk is devoted to the Guggenheim Bilbao a blunt reminder of how architecture has been used as a marketing gambit. A wall text unabashedly projects figures on the income the cultural hub could generate through new tourism.

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The Middle East Future Architecture As mentioned Saadiyat island will also be home to New Yorks Guggenheim museum designed by Frank O. Gehry. The new branch will provide 30000 square meters of space in typical Gehry fashion. A series of interconnected forms will make up the buildings structure on the island.

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE Meanwhile the development authority began a series of conversations with Yale University about creating an arts institute — encompassing art architecture music and drama — directly across the performing arts center. Next on the agenda is a competition to design a national museum. In some ways this array suggests the market’s insatiable appetite for novelty rather than a cohesive vision. In the early stages the various cultural institutions will rely mostly on art loans from foreign museums and performances by touring companies. For the time being Abu Dhabi has no opera company or orchestra that would use the performing arts center as a permanent home. And the exhibition at the Emirates Palace Hotel comes across as an extravagant marketing pitch to the country’s rulers who have yet to give the project final approval. A chunk is devoted to the Guggenheim Bilbao a blunt reminder of how architecture has been used as a marketing gambit. A wall text unabashedly projects figures on the income the cultural hub could generate through new tourism.

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A Vision in the Desert Abu Dhabi UAE Meanwhile the development authority began a series of conversations with Yale University about creating an arts institute — encompassing art architecture music and drama — directly across the performing arts center. Next on the agenda is a competition to design a national museum. In some ways this array suggests the market’s insatiable appetite for novelty rather than a cohesive vision. In the early stages the various cultural institutions will rely mostly on art loans from foreign museums and performances by touring companies. For the time being Abu Dhabi has no opera company or orchestra that would use the performing arts center as a permanent home. And the exhibition at the Emirates Palace Hotel comes across as an extravagant marketing pitch to the country’s rulers who have yet to give the project final approval. A chunk is devoted to the Guggenheim Bilbao a blunt reminder of how architecture has been used as a marketing gambit. A wall text unabashedly projects figures on the income the cultural hub could generate through new tourism.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - performing arts centre by Zaha Hadid the design for Abu Dhabis performing arts centre was conceived of by Zaha Hadid. The building is meant to house music theatre and dance located on Saadiyat island along with the new Louvre and Guggenheim museums. The island was intended to be a beacon for cultural experience and exchange by Abu Dhabis ruler Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - performing arts centre by Zaha Hadid

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - performing arts centre by Zaha Hadid

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - performing arts centre by Zaha Hadid

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - performing arts centre by Zaha Hadid

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - Ando’s Maritime Museum Ando’s Maritime Museum concept takes its inspiration from Abu Dhabi’s natural surroundings landscape and maritime traditions. It has a reflective surface visually merging sea and land. Its ship-like interior has floating decks which guide visitors through the exhibition space.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - Ando’s Maritime Museum

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The Middle East Future Architecture Abu Dhabi - Ando’s Maritime Museum

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The Middle East Future Architecture Sorough real estate is planning a grouping of large buildings in Abu Dhabi for their gate development. The complex will house a number of unique structures including the 83 story 379 meter tall sky tower. When complete it will be the 15th tallest residential tower in the world.

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The Middle East Future Architecture dbi design created this 5 tower project dubbed ‘The Ethiad Towers. The project is located on a the waterfront in Abu Dhabi near the business district. The 5 towers range in size from 55 to 77 stories.

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Ras al Khaimah UAE The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture This death-star like sphere is a design proposal for the RAK convention and exhibition centre in the new city development Ras al Khaimah. It was designed by rem koolhaas and reiner de graaf of OMA architects. The building is made of glass and steel constructed in a giant sphere and located beside a long and low exhibition space next to it. Ras al Khaimah

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The Middle East Future Architecture Conceived of as a gateway to the city of Dubai Norways Snohetta architects designed this cobra like building complex. The project was commissioned by Sheik Saud and Rakeen of Ras al- Khaimah. The design is meant to create an icon to serve as an entry point to the city. Covering over 300000 square meters of land the building will house a congress center exhibition space shopping center and 3 hotels. Rakeen of Ras al-Khaimah

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The Middle East Future Architecture Located in the emirate of Ras al Khaimah ‘Jebel al Jais mountain resort is a tourist resort designed by Rem Koolhaas of OMA architects. The project features an inhabited dam bridge and vertical village built right into the cliff. Ras al Khaimah

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Ajman UAE The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture Designer/architect: a-lab in collaboration with migrant urban planning ZINC interior designers and 13.3 Landscape architects Multiconsult Date/expected year of completion: 2009 Status of project spring 2007: Design development Firm website: www.a-lab.no Photo credit: 3d-model by Placebo Effects plans and sections by a-lab Ajman Municipal Headquarters Ajman United Arabic Emirates

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The Middle East Future Architecture The Norwegian architectural practice a-lab in collaboration with migrant urban planning ZINC interior designers and 13.3 Landscape architects Multiconsult won the 1st prize in the international competition for the design project of the new Municipal Headquarters in Ajman UA which was awarded to the Norwegian consortium by H.H. Sheikh Rashed bin Humaid Al Nuaimi the Chairman of Ajman Municipality and Planning Department. Ajman Municipal Headquarters Ajman United Arabic Emirates

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The Middle East Future Architecture The project ambition is to create a public landmark in Ajman and creating an icon of public service. The brief’s 15000 m2 are divided between a sixteen storey high-rise building housing the municipality administration and a single storey public building with reception public service plaza exhibition conference hall and caf facilities grouped around a courtyard an inner garden with water trees and palms. A line of open counters meeting rooms and offices in the back function as service stations and become the interface between the public and the different departments. A sail-like curved screen binds the project together serving to shade both the entrance forecourt area and the sunny side of the building. The space between the screen and the high-rise building is planted to create hanging gardens. The screen itself derives its pattern from traditional Arabic decoration. Water levels in the ground are high and easy accessible. Interior water canals connected to the exterior ‘moat’ separate different public functions. The facades around the courtyard are clad in screens of flowing water modulating both the interior and exterior light. Ajman Municipal Headquarters Ajman United Arabic Emirates

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The Middle East Future Architecture The sail construction The canopy provides shelter from the sun over the entrance plaza. Sun is filtered through it to dramatize light. It also gives direction to the lobby curving up and covers the other side of the tower leaning outwards before curving slightly over the roof providing semi-covered space for balconies hanging gardens etc. The effect transforms through the day - a sail in the sunrise a green mesh in daylight ablaze when illuminated from inside at night with greenery filtering light through the mesh. The architecture of the office tower is distinguishable from all angles. The “sail” will be formed as a dia-grid structure - the individual elements being made of advanced structural membranes with varying properties of translucency transparency colour and reflectivity. These membrane materials are highly durable and have been successfully used by Hightex over several decades in projects worldwide and in all types of climates this includes several notable projects in the Gulf region. Fluoropolymer membranes have excellent longevity and are very inert making them particularly resistant to sunlight and other extremes of weather. With the use of these state of the art materials individual areas of the sail can be designed to have different properties of light transmission shading and thermal characteristics in order to give the required optical and thermal environment beneath. Ajman Municipal Headquarters Ajman United Arabic Emirates

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The Middle East Future Architecture Ajman is a small island territory 20 km outside of Dubai which is also the United Arab Emirates smallest state. A large master plan is under way to transform the citys waterfront. Existing elements will be added onto and a series of new buildings will also be constructed. The whole plan cover 26 hectares of land area. Ajman

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Doha Qatar The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Future Architecture Qatar Foundation is headquartered in a unique Education City a 2500-acre campus on the outskirts of Doha which hosts branch campuses of some of the worlds leading universities as well as numerous other educational and research institutions. Supported by abundant residential and recreational facilities Education City is envisioned as a community of institutions that serve the whole citizen from early childhood education to post-graduate study. Moreover Education City is envisioned as a hub for the generation of new knowledge -- a place that provides researchers with world-class facilities a pool of well-trained graduates the chance to collaborate with likeminded people and the opportunity to transfer ideas into real-world applications. Qatar - Education City

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The Middle East Future Architecture Qatar - Education City – Liberal Arts and Science Building

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The Middle East Future Architecture Qatar - Education City – Medical College

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The Middle East Future Architecture Qatar - Education City – Medical College

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The Middle East Future Architecture Qatar - Education City – College of Engineering

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July 3 2008 The Education City Convention Center Doha Qatar The Education City Convention Center on the outskirts of Doha Qatar designed by Arata Isozaki includes a giant structure resembling two intertwined trees to support the buildings exterior canopy. Used in lieu of vertical columns the 250-meter- 820-foot- long doubly curved steel tree structure forms the signature entrance to the convention center currently under construction. The ten-square- kilometer 3.9-square-mile Education City development houses the headquarters of the Qatar Foundation and a number of branch campuses of some of the worlds foremost universities. The convention center depicts not just any kind of tree but specifically the sidra tree a multifaceted cultural symbol. This evergreen also known as the lote tree Ziziphus spina-christi is mentioned in the Quran as a symbol of knowledge of the divine. The foundation which takes the sidra as its logo cites the tree as a shady haven for scholars a source for traditional medicines and a symbol of life in the desert. The international engineering firm Buro Happold was called upon to design and engineer the sidra tree project for the entrance to the convention center. Arata Isozaki used computer generated models to optimize the lowest-weight structure that could support the roof. Sidra tree structure was a result of an optimization program. The conception of such a size and complexity was only the beginning. The design team faced the Herculean task of transforming the architectural vision into technical realities. Buro Happold’s SMART Software Modeling Analysis Research Technologies team was summoned and didn’t disappoint. The structure that they came up with has a dual layout: an outer curved complex form and underneath a structural core of octagonal cubes.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Doha Qatar - office tower designed by jean nouvel Due for completion later this year this 43 story office tower was designed by jean Nouvel. The building is located in Doha Qatar. the exterior is made from glass covered in a metal skin that is designed based on a traditional Islamic pattern.

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Saudi Arabia The Middle East Future Architecture

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Snøhetta Wins ‘King Abdulaziz Center for Knowledge and Culture’ Competition in Saudi Arabia In competition with some of the world’s greatest architects Snøhetta has won the competition about designing Saudi Arabia’s new Cultural Center. Saudi Aramco – the world’s largest oil company – is the client. King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz set the cornerstone for the Cultural Center which will house a museum library theater cinema and more. The building reflects the history of oil in Saudi Arabia and is different from the country’s architectonic traditions with its abstract and spectacular form. Along with five other internationally know architect offices Snøhetta participated in the competition and was chosen in preference to famous names as Zaha Hadid and Rem Koolhaas.

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The Middle East Future Architecture Al-Birr Foundation Office Tower Riyadh KSA Architects: Perkins+Will Al-Birr Foundation headquarters and office building. An intriciate and symbolic yet practical approach to an office tower that responds to a harsh environmental climate. Perkins+Will reinterpreted the typology of an urban tower in the spirit of Le Corbusier’s explorations of the brise-soleil calibrated to the extreme solar exposure and heat conditions of the microclimate of Riyadh. The design employs innovation in elevation and section rather than plan as the generator for functional solutions as well as symbolic analogies to Saudi historical precedents—the minaret the garden and the mashrabiya—all emblematic of the Foundation’s altruistic mission to protect replenish and speak for needy children and families. Completion: 2010 Area: 590000sqft Award: 2007 AIA New York State : Design Award of Merit

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Bahrain The Middle East Future Architecture

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A benchmark Kuwait office development short listed for prestigious award An Atkins Bahrain project the Al Sharq office complex has been short listed for the 2007 MIPIM Architectural Review Future Projects Award - Offices category. The 180m tower will cover an area of 56400sq.m. Commissioned by Al Mar Aqar the complex combines work and leisure internal and outside spaces and offers a variety of scenarios for business within a sustainable and environmentally responsible design. Hovering above a glass fronted entrance is a podium with a sky garden food court. Office spaces are hung from a pairing of parallel blades topped at roof level with a gym spa health club and pool. Floating above this pool deck is a suspended high-panoramic views. Solar panel cladding contributes to the green building’s energy needs while the foliage camouflage provides office workers a place to step outside and recharge.

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Arab Countries The Middle East Future Architecture

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Jordan The Middle East Future Architecture

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Zaha Hadid Delugan Meissl Assossiated Architects Win ‘Darat King Abdullah II’ Competition in Amman The Greater Amman Municipality as the promoter of the ‘Darat King Abdullah II’ architectural competition credited two design proposals with the first prize. The winning offices are the Austrian architects Delugan Meissl Assossiated Architects and the British architect Zaha Hadid. The Norwegian architecture office ‘Snøhetta’ became third. The competition was initiated following the directives of His Excellency King Abdullah II supported by a selected group of qualified advisers of the Hashemite Royal Office early last year. The aim was to establish a cultural centre in Jordan called ‘Darat King Abdullah II’. The premium city center site at Ras Al Ain on the other side of the Al-Hussein Cultural Center was chosen for the new venue of Jordan’s performing arts. The Municipality decided to organize an international architectural competition with top-class architects experienced in theater and opera planning in order to achieve the best and most appropriate design for this cultural landmark. The selection committee short-listed the six teams amongst 30 applicants because they achieved the requirements of the Municipality. The others did not fulfill the expectations in terms of the required experience. The building will be designed to be the center of various art activities and associations including the Amman Symphony Orchestra the National Institute of Music the National Folklore Group and the Amman Municipality Group of Folk Art. The ‘Darat King Abdullah II’ will additionally provide facilities and room for concerts dance and theatre performances for local and international groups. This new venue will consist of a large theater accommodating 1600 persons and a small theater with 400 seats available both equipped with highly sophisticated audio systems. Training areas and public facilities as a restaurant and a café will also be provided. The development will require a certain level of flexibility in terms of its design construction and operation to accommodate large events and experimental workshops. ‘Darat King Abdullah II’ will arrange local community events and become the cultural hub for artistic programs and activities. The building will also offer space for learning programs supporting education and training courses for children youth and adults in various disciplines. 1st Prize Zaha Hadid Architects London/UK 1st Prize Delugan Meissl Associates Austria

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Egypt The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Contemporary Architecture in Egypt

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The Middle East Contemporary Architecture in Egypt

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Syria The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Contemporary Architecture in Syria Great Umayyad Mosque

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Iraq The Middle East Future Architecture

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The Middle East Contemporary Architecture in Iraq Great or al-Mutawakkil Mosque

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