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Art Appreciation Dr. Yasser Mahgoub

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Course Syllabus Course Title: Art Appreciation Instructor: Dr. Yasser Mahgoub Homepage: http://members.fortunecity.com/ymahgou/ Email: ymahgoub@yahoo.com

Course Description:

Course Description Course Description Art history, criticism, and aesthetics. Visual analysis of works of arts as well as historical and critical writings. Course Activities Lecture, exercises, research, reports, presentations and field trips. Teaching Methodology Lectures to introduce Art Fundamentals textbook. A series of small exercises and projects are used to illustrate the design basics and develop students’ skills.

Method of Evaluation :

Method of Evaluation Attendance 10% Assignments 30% Mid Term Exam 20% Final Term Exam 40%

Textbook:

Textbook Art Fundamentals: Theory and Practice, 9/e, Otto Ocvirk, Bowling Green SU The course textbook provides an informed and thoughtful introduction to many different kinds of art. It is the most widely used text for introductory art and design courses . Art Fundamentals guides students through both the essential elements of art and the rich and varied history of their uses.

Textbook:

Textbook This new edition expands the wealth of study materials available to students and faculty by offering a free student CD-ROM and a complete Online Learning Center . Together these new materials help reinforce the principles and elements of design with practical exercises, self-guided tutorials, and interactive examples- without detracting from the central appeal of the text.

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Course Schedule

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Course Schedule

Examinations:

Examinations The course has two exams: a midterm and a final. You’ll take the midterm in chapters 1, 2 and 3. The final will cover all material from the course.

Introduction:

Introduction

What is ART?:

What is ART? Art is all around us . Our culture is filled with art of all types , sizes , and shapes . Art hangs on the walls of our homes and offices. It can be found in newspapers and magazines and on TV .

What is ART?:

What is ART? We can purchase art in a wide variety of forms, from inexpensive postcards and posters to original, one-of-a-kind art objects. We also live and work in buildings , making architecture an art form with which we have daily contact.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? Many of us feel that we can’t express ourselves when we try to talk or write about all the art that surrounds us.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? Or maybe we just want to better understand the art and architecture that we see around us every day.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? This course introduces you to the world of art that surrounds and permeates our culture.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? Its objective is to provide you with the tools that you need in order to look at , appreciate , understand , speak , and write about complex imagery.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? The course also introduces you to the art of many cultures . Since we live in an increasingly global society , it is imperative that we understand not only our own visual culture but that of our neighbors as well.

What is APPRECIATION?:

What is APPRECIATION? As you complete the course, my hope is that you will become a more thoughtful viewer of art , accepting the excitement and challenges that art can offer you.

Food for Thought:

Food for Thought Art can be a very challenging subject. It has an organization , social content , and historical context that can be very complex.

Food for Thought:

Food for Thought Look at the course’s material with an open mind , and be prepared to challenge your own habits of thinking about the world around you. Don’t judge ; just try to understand, you’ll be surprised at how much you’ll learn.

Food for Thought:

Food for Thought Most importantly, enjoy the course and its content . Art is a creative act that links the viewer and the artist across time and space . As you learn more about art, you’ll find that you learn not only about the world you live in but about yourself as well.

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Art Appreciation Dr. Yasser Mahgoub Assignment 1

Assignment 1:

Assignment 1

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Assignment: • Visit a virtual museum via internet (electronically). • Collect information about only “Five” works of art of your choice. • Analyze them according to "The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art" that produce Organic Unity: Subject – Form – Content. • Prepare a power point presentation to submit and present to the class. • Complete and submit the following form.

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples of virtual museums: http://www.artcyclopedia.com http://www.metmuseum.org http://www.metmuseum.org http://www.nga.gov/ http://www.louvre.fr http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.artcyclopedia.com

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.metmuseum.org

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.moma.org/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.nga.gov/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.louvre.fr

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/

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END

Art Appreciation:

Art Appreciation Part 1 Seeing vs. Thinking

Audience And Appreciation:

Audience And Appreciation What Is Appreciation? What Purpose Appreciation? What Is The Appreciator Like? What About The Appreciator’s Taste? Can Appreciation Be Taught?

What Is Appreciation?:

What Is Appreciation? One should always keep in mind that different arts serve different purposes, fill different needs. Often the value assigned to the artwork is not ‘art for art’s sake’ but rather entangled with other social values (e.g., religion, social interactions, etc.)

What Is Appreciation?:

What Is Appreciation? Perhaps There Are Two Aspects! The ability to perceive and evaluate the skill and importance of an artwork. The ability to respond to an artwork, to have an aesthetic experience in response to it.

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Can you tell what is this?

The Nature Of The Appreciator:

The Nature Of The Appreciator The often assumed characteristics: Educated Sophisticated Sensitive Cultured A ‘Good’ Person

The Appreciator And Taste:

The Appreciator And Taste With experience, our tastes change. We raise our expectations: We become more demanding, more discriminating! We want more complexity and more novelty. We find ourselves more in agreement with others of similar amounts of experience than with the general population.

Can Appreciation Be Taught?:

Can Appreciation Be Taught?

Art Appreciation Is Itself An ‘Art’:

Art Appreciation Is Itself An ‘Art’ Art is an creative interaction between appreciator and creator. What you get back is a function of what you put in. Not surprisingly, some of the best ‘appreciators’ are themselves ‘creators’; e.g., writers as reviewers.

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

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What do you think when you see this!

Art Appreciation:

Art Appreciation Part 1 Seeing vs. Thinking End

Art Appreciation:

Art Appreciation Part 2 Creativity

Creativity: Definitions:

Creativity: Definitions What do we mean when we say someone is CREATIVE ?

Creativity: Definitions:

Creativity as a process that leads to a creative product Creativity as the ability to create art Creativity as a particular skill or talent Creativity as a type of intelligence Creativity as a rich and complex association of cognitive elements Creativity as unusual approaches to life and problems Creativity: Definitions

Creativity: How To Measure It? :

Creativity: How To Measure It? Eminence: Cultural evaluation? Productivity: Quantity of work created? Psychological Tests: CQ tests?

Artistic Creativity & Scientific Creativity:

Artistic Creativity & Scientific Creativity What is the difference, if any, between artistic creativity and scientific creativity ?

Creativity and Innovation:

Creativity and Innovation Creativity – the ability to develop new ideas and to discover new ways of looking at problems and opportunities. Innovation – the ability to apply creative solutions to problems or opportunities to enhance or to enrich people’s lives.

Elements of Creativity:

Elements of Creativity Unique (original) Valued (useful) Intent (purpose) Continuance (implementation excellence)

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub

Barriers to Creativity:

Barriers to Creativity Searching for the one “right” answer Focusing on “being logical” Blindly following the rules Constantly being practical Viewing play as frivolous

Barriers to Creativity (continued):

Barriers to Creativity (continued) Becoming overly specialized Avoiding ambiguity Fearing looking foolish Fearing mistakes and failure Believing that “I’m not creative”

Enhancing Individual Creativity:

Enhancing Individual Creativity Allow yourself to be creative Give your mind fresh input every day Record your thoughts and ideas

The Creative Process:

The Creative Process Preparation Investigation Transformation Incubation Illumination Verification Implementation

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think! What you see is not always what you think!

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What you see is not always what you think!

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What you see is not always what you think!

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11/24/2012 Architectural Design - Dr. Yasser Mahgoub What you see is not always what you think!

Art Appreciation:

Art Appreciation Part 2 Creativity End

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K u w a i t U n i v e r s i t y College of Engineering and Petroleum Department of Architecture ARCH 181: Art Appreciation Instructor: Dr. Yasser Mahgoub Assignment 1

Assignment 1:

Assignment 1

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Assignment: • Visit a virtual museum via internet (electronically). • Collect information about only “Five” works of art of your choice. • Analyze them according to "The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art" that produce Organic Unity: Subject – Form – Content. • Prepare a power point presentation to submit and present to the class. • Complete and submit the following form.

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples of virtual museums: http://www.artcyclopedia.com http://www.metmuseum.org http://www.metmuseum.org http://www.nga.gov/ http://www.louvre.fr http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.artcyclopedia.com

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.metmuseum.org

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.moma.org/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.nga.gov/

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.louvre.fr

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk

Museum / Gallery Visit Project:

Museum / Gallery Visit Project Examples: http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/

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Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 A THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Art formal expression of a conceived image or imagined conception in terms of a given medium .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS abstraction The visual effects derived by the simplification and/or rearrangement of the appearance of natural objects, or nonrepresentational work arranged simply to satisfy artists‘ needs for organization or expression.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS abstraction Abstraction is present in varying degrees in all works of art, from full representation to complete nonobjectivity .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS aesthetic, aesthetics The theory of the artistic or the " beautiful "; traditionally a branch of philosophy , but now a compound of the philosophy, psychology, and sociology of art.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS aesthetic, aesthetics Aesthetics is no longer solely confined to determining what is beautiful in art , but attempts to discover the origins of sensitivity to art forms and the relationship between art and other aspects of culture (such as science, industry, morality, philosophy, and religion).

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS conceptual perception Creative vision derived from the imagination.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS content The expression, essential meaning, significance, or aesthetic value of a work of art.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS content Content refers to the sensory, subjective, psychological, or emotional properties we feel in a work of art, as opposed to our perception of its descriptive aspects alone.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS craftsmanship Aptitude, skill , or quality workmanship in the use of tools and materials.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS decorative (art, line, shape, color, etc.) Ornamenting or enriching but, more importantly in art, emphasizing the two-dimensional nature of an artwork or any of its elements. Decorative art emphasizes the essential flatness of a surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

descriptive (art) A type of art that is based upon adherence to actual appearances . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

design The underlying plan on which artists base their total work. In a broader sense, design may be considered synonymous with the term form . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

elements of art Line, shape, value, texture, and color The basic ingredients the artist uses separately or in combination to produce artistic imagery . Their use produces the visual language of art . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

expression I. The manifestation through artistic form of thought, emotion, or quality of meaning. 2. In art, expression is synonymous with the term content . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

form I. The organization or inventive arrangement of all the visual elements according to the principles that will develop unity in the artwork. 2. The total appearance or organization. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

graphic art 1. Two-dimensional art forms, such as drawing, painting, making prints, etc. 2. The two-dimensional use of the elements of art. 3. May also refer to the techniques of printing as used in newspapers, books, magazines, etc. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

mass 1. In graphic art, a shape that appears to stand out three-dimensionally from the space surrounding it, or appears to create the illusion of a solid body of material. 2. In the plastic arts, the physical bulk of a solid body of material. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

medium, media (pi.) The material(s) and tool(s) used by the artist to create the visual elements perceived by the viewer. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

naturalism The approach to art that is essentially a description of things visually experienced. Pure naturalism would contain no personal interpretation introduced by the artist. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

negative area(s) The unoccupied or empty space left after the positive elements have been created by the artist. However, when these areas have boundaries, they also function as design shapes in the total structure. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

nonobjective, nonrepresentational (art) A type of art that is entirely imaginative and not derived from anything visually perceived by the artist. The elements, their organization, and their treatment by the artist are entirely personalized and, consequently, not associated by the observer with any previously experienced natural objects. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

objective (art, shape) A type of art that is based, as near as possible , on physical actuality or optical perception. Such art tends to appear natural or real . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

optical perception A way of seeing in which the mind has no other function than the natural one of providing the visual sensation of object recognition. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

organic unity A condition in which the components of art — that is, subject, form, and content — are so vital and interdependent that they may be likened to a living organism. A work having "organic unity“ is not guaranteed to have "greatness" or unusual merit. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

picture frame The outermost limits or boundary of the picture plane. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

picture plane The actual flat surface on which the artist executes a pictorial image. In some cases, the picture plane acts merely as a transparent plane of reference to establish the illusion of forms existing in a three- dimensional space. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

plane I. An area that is essentially two- dimensional, having height and width. 2. A flat or level surface. 3. A two-dimensional surface having a positive extension and spatial direction or position. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

plastic (art) I. The use of the elements of art to create the illusion of the third dimension on a two-dimensional surface . 2. Three- dimensional art forms, such as architecture, sculpture, ceramics, etc. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

positive area(s) The state in the artwork in which the art elements (shape, line, etc.), or their combination, produce the subject — nonrepresentational or recognizable images. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

realism, Realism (art movement) A style of art that retains the basic impression of visual actuality without going to extremes of detail . In addition, realism attempts to relate and interpret the universal meanings that lie beneath surface appearances. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

Representation (al) (art) A type of art in which the subject is presented through the visual art elements so that the observer is reminded of actual objects . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

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space The interval, or measurable distance, between points or images. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

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style The specific artistic character and dominant trends of form noted during periods of history and art movements. Style may also refer to artists‘ expressive use of media to give their works individual character. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

subject I. In a descriptive approach to art, subject refers to the persons or things represented, as well as the artists‘ experiences, that serve as inspiration. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

subject 2. In abstract or nonobjective forms of art, subject refers merely to the visual signs used by the artist. In this case, the subject has little to do with anything experienced in the natural environment . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

subjective (art, shape, color, etc.) That which is derived from the mind reflecting a personal viewpoint, bias, or emotion. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

technique The manner and skill with which artists use their tools and materials to achieve an expressive effect. The ways of using media can have a strong effect on the aesthetic quality of an artist's total concept. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

three-dimensional Possessing the illusion of dimension of depth, in addition to having the dimensions of height and width. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

two-dimensional Possessing the dimensions of height and width , especially when considering the flat surface, or picture plane. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

unity The result of bringing the elements of art into the appropriate ratio between harmony and variety to achieve a sense of oneness . THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

volume A measurable area of defined or occupied space. THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 Introduction A End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 Introduction b

The Need and Search for Art:

ART  Many interpretations FUNDAMENTALS  The basic fabric of art The Need and Search for Art

The Need and Search for Art Discussion:

What is your definition of ART? What “IS” art and what is “NOT” art? The Need and Search for Art Discussion

The Need and Search for Art Some Definitions of ART::

The formal expression of a conceived image in terms of a given medium . (Cheney) The making of a form produced by cooperation of all the faculties of the mind (Longman) Significant form (Bell) The Need and Search for Art Some Definitions of ART:

The Need and Search for Art Definitions of ART::

A unified manifold which is pleasure-giving (Mather) A diagram or paradigm with a meaning that gives pleasure (Lostowel) Objectified pleasure (Santayana) The Need and Search for Art Definitions of ART:

The Need and Search for Art PLEASURE:

PLEASURE  a component of art. It is a different thing to different people . Art can be a relaxant or stimulant . For the artist, it can also produce frustration and a sense of achievement . The Need and Search for Art PLEASURE

The Need and Search for Art AESTEHTICS:

AESTEHTICS  the appreciation of the “beautiful”. Definitions of BEAUTY Historical cultures have had their own concepts of beauty , many of which would not correspond to contemporary tastes . The Need and Search for Art AESTEHTICS

The Need and Search for Art The PUBLIC:

What does the public often like and expect in art? THREE THINGS: The familiar subject The recognizable subject The sentimental or “pleasant” subject. The Need and Search for Art The PUBLIC

The Need and Search for Art The PUBLIC:

Poorly executed Expertly executed Not all people, even with similar backgrounds, would agree on the “beauty” of a given subject, much less its interpretation . The Need and Search for Art The PUBLIC

The Need and Search for Art The ARTISTS:

More concerned with the “ how ” ( the technique used to create the work ), than the “ what ” ( the final product ) Art has always been produced because an artist has wanted to say something and has chosen a particular way of saying it. The Need and Search for Art The ARTISTS Vincent Van Gogh

The Need and Search for Art:

Many people want to be actively engaged in art but find that much of what they see is not meaningful to them . The Need and Search for Art

The Need and Search for Art:

In order to gain some appreciation for the many forms of art to which we have access today, we must understand the basics from which they have grown . The Need and Search for Art

The Need and Search for Art:

Understanding by examining the nature of the many factors involved in producing artworks, including the principles that govern those factors. The Need and Search for Art

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Ex. Piet Mondrian

The Ingredients of Art:

Subject - Form - Content The Ingredients of Art In Art, we have the motivation (subject), the substantiation (form), and communication (content.)

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Organic Unity Subject Form Concept

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject:

Traditionally  Person, object, theme Today  abstract age particular configuration of the art elements, a record of the energy and movement of the artist The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form:

The work’s appearance or organization The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

Traditionally The work’s total message as developed by artist and interpreted by the viewer . Today  Derived from the artist’s experience . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art::

Principles of organization : Harmony, variety, balance, movement, proportion, dominance, and economy. Elements of organization : Line, Shape, Value, Texture, and Color. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art:

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject:

A person , a thing , or an idea . In abstract or semiabstract works , the subject may be somewhat perceivable. In nonobjective works , the subject is the idea behind the form of the work, and it communicates with those who can read the language of form. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject:

The subject is important only to the degree that the artist is motivated by it . The subject is just a starting point . The way it is presented or formed to give it expression is the important consideration. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject:

Art parallels music in presenting a “ nonrecognizable ” subject. The subject is an idea rather than a thing . All of the arts have subjects that obviously should not be judged alone , but by what is done with them . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Subject

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form:

A result of the use of the ELEMENTS of line, texture, color, shape, and value and their relationship to the PRINCIPLES of harmony and variety. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form:

Formal organization involves all the visual devices available to the artist in the material of his or her choice. Arrange Intuitively vs Logically Formal order The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Form

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

The emotional or intellectual message of an artwork. A statement , expression , or mood read into the work by its observer, ideally synchronized with the artist’s intention . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

The symbols of death: blacks and somber grays, reduced awareness of texture, and emphasis of low diagonals. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

For many people , content is confined to familiar associations , usually by feeling aroused by known objects or ideas . More meaningfully , content is not utterly reliant on the image but reinforced by the form created by the artist. This content is found in an abstract as well as more realistic works. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

Abstraction : All visual artworks require some degree of abstraction. A greater degree of abstraction is often more difficult to understand and appreciate. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

Abstraction : A process that imposes itself on the artist in reaching the desired effect in a work. Involves reordering and emphasis , stripping-down to expressive and communicative essentials . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

Simplification vs Making the deeper meaning more accessible . Abstract is more often a VERB than a NOUN . (a process not a product) The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content:

The artist manipulates the artistic elements line, shape, etc. (the “ what ”) to create the kind of form (the “how”) that will result in the desired content (the “why”) The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Content

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 Introduction b End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 Introduction C

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity:

Organic Unity : containing nothing that is unnecessary or distracting, with relationships that seem inevitable . Wholeness is difficult to detect in the works of some contemporary artists who challenge tradition. The distinction between subject, form, and content are blurred. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity:

Conceptual Art : the concept is foremost, the product is considered negligible, and the concept and subject seem to be one. Process Art : the act of producing is the only significant aspect of the artwork The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity:

Perceptual Artist : Records only what is perceived. Conceptual Artist (idea-oriented): concerned with responses that with commonplace perceptions. The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Organic Unity

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Creativity :

Creativity emanates from ideas . An idea is born in the mind . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Creativity

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Concept:

A Concept : an all-encompassing plan , a unique or particularly suitable set of relationships , an attitude that could be conveyed a way of conveying an attitude a solution to a visual problem The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Concept

The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Concept:

In the artist’s mind, the idea occurs as mental imagery , an inspiration , or the end product of much thoughtful searching (notes, sketches, …) Creative enterprises are occasionally plagued by mental blocks . In Art, an idea is of value only when converted into visual reality . The Three Basic Components of a Work of Art: Concept

Savoring the Ingredients:

All art is illusory to some extent. Some artworks are more successful than others at drawing us out of our standard existence into a more meaningful state . Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

In seeing and hearing the arts, we are not in the everyday world , but rather a hyper-sensitized world of “ greater ” values. Savoring the Ingredients ART ENLARGES OUR AWARENESS.

Savoring the Ingredients:

Being Subjective : the artist reaches below surface appearances and uses unfamiliar ways to find unexpected truths . The results can often be distressing for many observers. We all have the capacity to appreciate the beautiful or expressive. We must enlarge our sensitivity and taste , making them more inclusive. Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

S ee the uniqueness in things. Every rose has a different character, even with identical breeding and grooming. Every object is ultimately unique. The artist should have the ability to see the subtle difference in things. Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

Perception is the key. Optical Perception : When an artist views an object and is inspired to try to reproduce the original as seen . Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

Conceptual Perception : When another artist seeing the same object, the imagination triggers the creative vision and additional images are suggested . Many people judge a work of art by how closely it can be made to look like something. Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

The Camera! Photographers become artists when they are not satisfied with obvious appearances . Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

People tend to associate visual art with literature, hoping that it will tell a story in a descriptive manner. Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

In adapting ourselves to the rules peculiar to art, we must also place our own taste on trial . Accepting the possibility that what is unfamiliar or disliked may not necessarily be badly executed or devoid of meaning. Savoring the Ingredients

Savoring the Ingredients:

Artists expand our frames of references, revealing new ways of seeing and responding to our surroundings. When we view artworks knowledgeably , we can be on the same wavelength with the artist’s finely tuned emotions. Savoring the Ingredients

The Ingredients Assembled Elements of Art:

Any construction project requires structural elements. Elements of Art are: Line Shape Value Texture Color The Ingredients Assembled Elements of Art

The Ingredients Assembled The VISION:

The VISION Giving shape by the way the elements are brought together. Two-Dimensional Effect (circle, triangle, or square) Elements lie flat on the picture plane. Three-Dimensional Effect (sphere, pyramid, or cube) Elements penetrate the plane. The Ingredients Assembled The VISION

The Ingredients Assembled The VISION:

Decorative  Ornamentation Line is decorative if it does not leap toward or away from the viewer. The Ingredients Assembled The VISION

The Ingredients Assembled The VISION:

Plastic  When the elements make us feel that we could dive into the picture and weave our way around and behind the art elements. The Ingredients Assembled The VISION

The Ingredients Assembled The VISION:

Sculpture  We must move about the piece. Mass and Volume indicate the presence of three-dimensional art. An empty living room has volume in its dimensions, but no mass . A brick has mass within its volume . The Ingredients Assembled The VISION

The Ingredients Assembled Plastic vs Graphic Art:

Graphic Arts  drawings, paintings, printmaking, photography, and so on. Generally exists on a flat surface and rely on the illusion of the third dimension. The Ingredients Assembled Plastic vs Graphic Art

The Ingredients Assembled Plastic vs Graphic Art:

Plastic Arts  sculpture, ceramics, architecture, and so on. Tangible an palpable (physical), occupying and encompassed by their own space. The Ingredients Assembled Plastic vs Graphic Art

The Ingredients Assembled The Idea:

An artist must begin with an idea , or a germ, that will eventually develop into the concept of the finished artwork. A thought that has suddenly struck the artist, or a notion that has been growing in his or her mind for a long time. The IDEA must be developed in a medium selected by the artist (clay, oil, pint, water color, etc.) The Ingredients Assembled The Idea

The Ingredients Assembled The Medium:

The artist Controls and is Controlled by the medium . The Ingredients Assembled The Medium

The Ingredients Assembled The COMPOSITION:

The COMPOSITION  the formal structure --- the most interesting and communicative presentation of an idea. During this process ABSTRACTION will inevitably occur; elements will be simplified, changed, added, eliminated, or generally edited. The Ingredients Assembled The COMPOSITION

The Ingredients Assembled The Organic Unity:

The Creative Process should lead to Organic Unity: The culmination of everything that is being sought in the work, that every part not only fits, but that each one contributes to the overall content, or meaning . The Ingredients Assembled The Organic Unity

CD Two-Dimensional Media and Techniques:

Media are the materials used in making an artwork, and techniques control their application. The artist’s interaction with the media. Successful Process. CD Two-Dimensional Media and Techniques

CD Two-Dimensional Media and Techniques:

Painters  smell and feel of fresh plaster – oil and watercolors Draftsmen  heavy pressure or light touch – textural quality of paper Printmaking  watching the physical surface change Photography  innovations – experiments New Media  Digital generated imagery, acrylics, pre-liquified watercolors, drawing pens, welding, plastics, aluminum, video, virtual reality, performances (dance, drama, sound, light, audience), .. CD Two-Dimensional Media and Techniques

The Two-Dimensional Picture Plane:

A flat surface  the picture plane The need to somehow establish a relationship between the actual environment and the reduced size . Spatial illusions The Two-Dimensional Picture Plane

The Two-Dimensional Picture Plane:

The artist may manipulate forms or elements so that they seem flat on the picture plane , or extend them so that they appear to exist in front of or behind the picture plane. The Two-Dimensional Picture Plane

The Picture Frame:

Defined boundaries around the working area, or picture plane. The Picture Frame

The Picture Frame:

Once its shape and proportions are defined, all of the art elements and their employment will be influenced by it . Within the picture frame on the picture plane. The Picture Frame

The Picture Frame:

Many artists select the outside proportions of their pictures on the basis of geometric ratios . Most artists rely on their instincts rater on a mechanical formula. The direction and movement of the elements of art should be in harmonious relation to this shape. The Picture Frame

Positive and Negative Areas:

UNITY  All of the surface areas in a picture. Positive areas  areas that represent the artist’s initial selection of elements Negative areas  Unoccupied areas Positive and Negative Areas

Positive and Negative Areas:

Traditionally Positive  figure and/or foreground Negative  background Recently Field  positive Ground  negative Positive and Negative Areas

Positive and Negative Areas:

Inexperienced artists usually direct their attention to positive forms and neglect the surrounding areas. Positive and Negative Areas

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 1 Introduction C End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 Form

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 a THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Form : 1. The arbitrary organization or inventive arrangement of all the visual elements according to the principles that will develop unity in the artwork. 2. The total appearance or organization.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Form : 1. The arbitrary organization or inventive arrangement of all the visual elements according to the principles that will develop unity in the artwork. 2. The total appearance or organization.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS academic Art that conforms to established traditions and approved conventions as practiced in art academies . Academic art stresses standards and set procedures and rules .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS allover pattern The repetition of designed units in a readily recognizable systematic organization covering the entire surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS allover pattern The repetition of designed units in a readily recognizable systematic organization covering the entire surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS allover pattern The repetition of designed units in a readily recognizable systematic organization covering the entire surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS approximate symmetry The use of similar imagery on either side of a central axis. The visual material on one side may resemble that on the other but is varied to prevent visual monotony.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS asymmetry Having unlike , or non-corresponding, appearances - " without symmetry ." An example: a two-dimensional artwork that, without any necessarily visible or implied axis , displays an uneven distribution of parts throughout.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS balance A sense of equilibrium achieved through implied weight , attention, or attraction, by manipulating the visual elements within an artwork to achieve unity.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS closure A concept from Gestalt psychology in which the development of groupings or patterned relationships occurs when incomplete information is seen as a complete , unified whole; the artist provides minimum visual clues, and the observer brings them to final recognition.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS composition An arrangement and/or structure of all the art elements, according to the principles of organization, that achieves a unified whole. Often used interchangeably with the term design .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS concept I. A comprehensive idea or generalization. 2. An idea that brings diverse elements into a basic relationship .

What can you make from the elements on the left?:

What can you make from the elements on the left?

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS design The underlying plan on which artists base their total work. In a broader sense, design may be considered synonymous with the term form .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS dominance The principle of visual organization in which certain elements assume more importance than others in the same composition or design. Some features are emphasized , and others are subordinated.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS economy The distillation of the image to the basic essentials for clarity of presentation.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Gestalt (Gestalt psychology) A German word for " form "; an organized whole in experience. Around 1912, the Gestalt psychologists promoted the theory that explains psychological phenomena by their relationships to total forms , or Gestalten, rather than by their parts . “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section I. Golden mean - "perfect" harmonious proportions that avoid extremes; the moderation between extremes.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section 2. Golden section - a traditional proportional system for visual harmony expressed when a line or area is divided into two sections so that the smaller part is to the larger as the larger is to the whole . The ratio developed is 1: 1.6180 ... or roughly 8:1 3.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section The ratio developed is 1: 1.6180 ... or roughly 8:1 3.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section The ratio developed is 1: 1.6180 ... or roughly 8:1 3.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section The ratio developed is 1: 1.6180 ... or roughly 8:1 3.

PowerPoint Presentation:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS golden mean, golden section

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS harmony The quality of relating the visual elements of a composition . Harmony is achieved by the repetition of characteristics that are the same or similar. These cohesive factors create pleasing interaction.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS interpenetration The movement of planes, objects, or shapes through each other , locking them together within a specified area of space.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS motif A designed unit or pattern that is repeated often enough in the total composition to make it a significant or dominant feature. Motif is similar to theme or melody in a musical composition.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS movement Eye travel directed by visual pathways in a work of art.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS pattern I. Any artistic design (sometimes serving as a model for imitation). 2. A repeated element and/or design that is usually varied and produces interconnections and obvious directional movements.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS principles of organization Seven principles that guide the use of the elements of art in achieving unity: harmony, variety, balance, proportion, dominance, movement, and economy.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS proportion The comparative relationship between the parts of a whole or units as to size.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS radial Emanating from a central location.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS repetition The use of the same visual effect a number of times in the same composition. Repetition may produce the dominance of one visual idea , a feeling of harmonious relationship , an obviously planned pattern , or a rhythmic movement.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS rhythm A continuance, a flow, or a sense of movement achieved by the repetition of regulated visual units; the use of measured accents.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS scale The association of size relative to a constant standard or specific unit of measure related to human dimensions .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS symmetry The exact duplication of appearances in mirror-like repetition on either side of a (usually imaginary) straight-lined central axis.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS transparency A visual quality in which a distant image or element can be seen through a nearer one.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS unity The result of bringing the elements of art into the appropriate ratio between harmony and variety to achieve a sense of oneness .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS variety Differences achieved by opposing, contrasting, changing, elaborating, or diversifying elements in a composition to add individualism and interest; the counterweight of harmony in art.

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 a THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS END

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 Form B

Form and Visual Ordering:

Form and Visual Ordering A completed work of art = Subject + Form + Content

Form and Visual Ordering:

Form and Visual Ordering Form: The structural principles of visual order. When we see images, we take part in visual forming. The mind instinctively tries to create order out of chaos. Artists are visual formers with a plan.

Form and Visual Ordering:

Form and Visual Ordering Principles of Organization : Harmony Variety Balance Proportions Dominance Movement Economy = UNITY

Form and Visual Ordering:

Form and Visual Ordering The PLAN  Composition or Design The plan will effectively communicate the artist’s feelings. How the elements are organized.

Form and Visual Ordering:

Form and Visual Ordering One must know about the individual elements in order to use them to harmonize a work.

The Seven Principles of Organization:

The Seven Principles of Organization Harmony Variety Balance Proportions Dominance Movement Economy = UNITY

The Seven Principles of Organization:

The Seven Principles of Organization The principles are used to help organize the elements into some kind of action. Organization in art consists of developing a unified whole out of diverse units.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY Cohesion  relating various pictures’ parts Common elements: Color Texture Value …

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY Repetition  continued introduction of the same device or element. Rhythm  regulated visual units are repeated Harmony  may create the feeling of boredom or monotony when its use is carried to extremes.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition Repetition does not require exact duplication but, instead, similarity or near likeness.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition Carefully handled repetition can use the similarities as links for developing planned eye travel for the observer . Emphases tend to hold our attention. The least related can also achieve emphasis.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Repetition Harmonious relationships are similarly established in art through repetition.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Pattern:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Pattern Any arrangement or design and may function as the model for imitation or for making things. A noticeable formation. Geometrical pattern or by objects.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY –Pattern:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Pattern

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif Basic unit, cell, or original pattern (model) created and repeated.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif The natural allover pattern becomes more important than the repeating motif after changing color, value, and texture.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Motif Hats represent strong motif.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm Repeated regularly or eccentric. Smoothly flowing or less regular and even jerky.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm A gentle rhythm suggests peace . Very active rhythm suggests violent action .

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm Variation in size or volume may create more interest. The intervals of silence between repeating units.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Rhythm Dum Tac Silence

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure Gestalt Psychology (Max Wertheimer) Group relations rather than individual items. Nearness and Size help objects relate visually.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure Gestalt ge·stalt or Ge·stalt (g -shtält , -shtôlt , -stält , -stôlt ) n. pl. ge·stalts or ge·stalt·en (-shtält n, -shtôlt n, -stält n, -stôlt n) A physical, biological, psychological, or symbolic configuration or pattern of elements so unified as a whole that its properties cannot be derived from a simple summation of its parts . Also called gestalt phenomenon . Source : The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure Closure  People tend to see incomplete patterns or information as complete or unified wholes. Minimum information  Understanding

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure Help explain how artists see and create structural organization or pattern in their work. The whole is greater than the individual parts. Positive Images  Negative Areas The mind fills in missing information.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure The importance of spacing in visually joining the units.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure:

59 Optical Illusions & Visual Phenomena by Michael Bach, University of Freiburg, Germany The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY - Closure

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 Form B END

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 Form C

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking Connections – Shard edges Sharing imposes other common relationships. Same size Related color or value

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking Overlapping Common relationship Shared item Unrelated objects can be harmonized

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking Transparency See through - Layers of space

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking Interpretation Pass through – Depth of space

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking Extensions Implied and subjective edges, lines or shapes. A visual alignment system. Location for new objects, images or shapes. Creates hidden relationships. Direct the eye to a new location. Use Line or Shapes.

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking:

The Seven Principles of Organization (1) HARMONY – Visual Linking

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY:

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY Harmony  UNITY  Variety Achieves Individuality and Interest. Interest : The ability to arouse curiosity and to hold the viewer attention. Complete equality of visual forces  Static, lifeless, unemotional  Visual boredom

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY - Contrast:

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY - Contrast Elements repeated in a way that makes them appear unrelated. Dissimilarities. Red against Green. Extreme dark against extreme light.

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY - Elaboration:

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY - Elaboration Addition of details Introduce visual difference or opposition.

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY:

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY Applying Harmony and Variety at the same time and by using the same element.

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY:

The Seven Principles of Organization (2) VARIETY Harmony and Variety: an instrument / a concept that will help explore the other principles of organization.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE Gravitational forces. Gravity  Walking - Standing Most artworks are viewed vertically. Top Bottom Side Side

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

tension baseline baseline peace lifting up pulling The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE Gravity affects visual composition.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE Psychological factors can affect the visual weight and balance. Balance is fundamental to unity. Gravitational Equilibrium

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE Balance must be viewed not as an actual physical weighing process but as visual judgments of the observer. Factors that contribute to balance include: Position, Size, Proportion, Character, and Direction

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE - Symmetrical:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE - Symmetrical Mirror view. Pure Symmetry. Aggressively confrontational. Static quality.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE - Symmetrical:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE - Symmetrical

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Approximate Symmetrical:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Approximate Symmetrical Different - not identical. Weights of the components.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Approximate Symmetrical:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Approximate Symmetrical

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial Can create true or approximate symmetry. A central point. Visual circulation.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial:

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Radial

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Asymmetrical (occult):

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Asymmetrical (occult) Felt equilibrium between parts. Ex. Small area of strong color and a large empty space.

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Asymmetrical (occult):

The Seven Principles of Organization (3) BALANCE – Asymmetrical (occult)

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion The ratio of individual parts to one another. Scale  Size

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion Classical Greek philosophy  MATHEMATICS was the controlling force of the universe.

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion The GOLDEN MEAN / SECTION The Greek mathematician Euclid The “moderation of all things”. A small part relates to a larger part as the larger part relates to the whole. Ratio 1.16180

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion 13 th Century medieval mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci ( Liber Abaci 1202 ): Fibonacci Series: 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,56,and so on. Ratio approximately 1.16180 10,16,26,42,68,110,178,and so on.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci ( Proportions of the Human Figure 1485 )

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion The Modulor Le Corbusier

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion Scaling is used to create emphasis and expressive effects and to suggest spatial positions.

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion Hierarchical Scaling Indicate rank, status, or importance of religious, political, military, and social personages. Figures of greatest importance are made larger in size according to their status.

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion:

The Seven Principles of Organization (4) Proportion

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance:

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance Differences that emphasize the degrees of importance of its various parts. Result from medium and compositional considerations. Isolation or separation of one part from others Placement Direction Scale Character Contrasts in color, value, and texture also help to produce this attraction.

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance:

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance:

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance:

The Seven Principles of Organization (5) Dominance Two problems with dominance: Must see that each part has the necessary degree of importance. Must incorporate these parts, with their varying degrees of importance, into the rhythmic movement and balance of the work.

The Seven Principles of Organization (6) Movement:

The Seven Principles of Organization (6) Movement “A ride” – “A tour” The artist makes the eyes travel comfortable and informative. Direction of lines, shapes, and motifs. Mona Lisa  little eye movement is required.

The Seven Principles of Organization (6) Movement:

The Seven Principles of Organization (6) Movement Kinetic (moving) sculpture vs Static sculpture and picture. An illusion of movement created by the artist through the configuration of their parts. The work of art can be read in a variety of directions.

The Seven Principles of Organization (7) Economy:

The Seven Principles of Organization (7) Economy Unnecessary complexity. The work deteriorating into fragmentation. Returning to significant essentials. Eliminating elaborate details. Relating the particulars to the whole.

The Seven Principles of Organization (7) Economy:

The Seven Principles of Organization (7) Economy If something works with respect to the whole, it is kept; if disruptive, it may be reworked or rejected. Economy  Abstraction Parting things down to the essentials necessary to the artist’s style of expression. The style dictates the degree of abstraction, though all artists abstract to some extent.

Form Unity: A Summary:

Form Unity: A Summary Picture plane framed by certain dimension. Tools and Materials. Create elements on the surface. Spatial suggestions appear. Adjustment. Harmony and Variety applied. To achieve balance, proportion, dominance, movement and economy. Unity … All parts belong and work together. A THEME

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 2 Form End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 3 Line Part 1 The Vocabulary of Line Line: The Elementary Means of Communication The Physical Characteristics of Line Measure Type Direction Location Character The Expressive Properties of Line Line and the Other Art Elements Line and Shape Line and Value Line and Texture Line and Color The Spatial Characteristics of Line Line and Representation

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Line The path of a moving point that is made by a tool, instrument, or medium as it moves across an area. A line usually made visible because it contrasts in value with its surroundings.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS calligraphy Elegant, decorative writing. Lines used in artworks that possess the qualities found in this kind of writing may be called "calligraphic" and are generally flowing and rhythmical.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS contour The line that defines the outermost limits of an object or a drawn or painted shape . It is sometimes considered to be synonymous with " outline "; as such, it indicates an edge that also may be defined by the extremities of darks, lights, textures, or colors .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS cross-contour A line that crosses and defines the surface undulations between, or up to, the outermost edges of shapes or objects.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS expression The manifestation through artistic form of a thought , emotion , or quality of meaning . In art, expression is synonymous with the term content .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS hatching Repeated strokes of an art tool producing clustered lines (usually parallel) that create values. In " cross-hatching ," similar lines pass over the hatched lines in a different direction, usually resulting in darker values.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS implied line Implied lines (subjective lines) are those that dim, fade, stop, and/or disappear. Missing portion of the line is implied to continue and is visually completed by the observer as the line reappears.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Representation (al) art A type of art in which the subject is presented through the visual art elements so that the observer is reminded of actual objects. (See naturalism and realism)

Line: The elementary means of communication:

Line: The elementary means of communication Line is the most familiar of the art elements. Handwriting Sketching Drawing

Line: The elementary means of communication:

Line: The elementary means of communication Theoretically: a line is an extended dot . The physical characteristics are used by the artist to create meanings.

Line: The elementary means of communication:

Line: The elementary means of communication Line in Nature

Line: The elementary means of communication:

Line: The elementary means of communication Line  A graphic device of visual instruction Symbol of something observed

Line: The elementary means of communication:

Line: The elementary means of communication Line  Communicative manners: Defining limits of shape Meeting of areas A contour

Line:

Line Implied line Suggest spatial change, movement, or animation. Fade, stop, and/or disappear and then reappear as a continuation or an extension of an edge or a direction.

Line:

Line Actual lines

Line:

Line Calligraphic line Personal Flowing Rhythmical Intriguing to the eye

Line:

Line Calligraphy Grace Elegancy

Line:

Line Functions Creation of Value and Texture. Reproduce the appearance of subjects.

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 3 Line End of Part 1

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 3 Line Part 2 The Vocabulary of Line Line: The Elementary Means of Communication The Physical Characteristics of Line Measure Type Direction Location Character The Expressive Properties of Line Line and the Other Art Elements Line and Shape Line and Value Line and Texture Line and Color The Spatial Characteristics of Line Line and Representation

The Physical Characteristics of Line:

The Physical Characteristics of Line Strait or curved Direct or meandering Short or long Thin or thick Zigzag or serpentine Built-in Associations

The Physical Characteristics of Line 1- MEASURE:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 1- MEASURE Length or width Long and short Thick and thin Divide Balance Unbalance

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE Straight Curved Angular + Long or Short Thick or Thin

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE Continues in only one direction  STRAIGHHT Changes direction gradually occur  CURVED Changes sudden and abrupt  ANGULAR

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE Alterations of movement become visually entertaining and physically stimulating if they are rhythmical . Graceful Unstable

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 2- TYPE Our eyes frequently have difficulty adapting to an angular line’s unexpected deviations of direction. Excitement Confusion Challenge

The Physical Characteristics of Line 3- DIRECTION:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 3- DIRECTION Basic direction  Basic movement. Horizontal  serenity and perfect stability. Diagonal  agitation and motion. Vertical  poise and aspiration.

The Physical Characteristics of Line 3- DIRECTION:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 3- DIRECTION The direction of line is very important because it controls the movements of our eyes while we view a picture. Our eye movements can facilitate the continuity of relationships among the various properties of the elements.

The Physical Characteristics of Line 4- LOCATION:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 4- LOCATION According to placement, a line can serve to: Unify Divide Balance Unbalance Various attributes can act in concert toward one goal or can serve separate roles of expression.

The Physical Characteristics of Line 5- CHARACTER:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 5- CHARACTER The Medium with which the line is created. Monotony could result from the consistent use of lines of the same character unless the unity so gained is balanced by the variation of other physical properties.

The Physical Characteristics of Line 5- CHARACTER:

The Physical Characteristics of Line 5- CHARACTER The personality or emotional quality of the line is greatly dependent on the nature of the medium chosen.

The Expressive Properties of line:

The Expressive Properties of line Line Feelings: Somber Tired Energetic Brittle Alive The spectator must be receptive and perceptive and have a reservoir of experiences to draw upon.

The Expressive Properties of line:

The Expressive Properties of line Euphoria Tired Angry Confusion Content Excited Frustrated Lazy

The Expressive Properties of line:

The Expressive Properties of line Through Composition and Expression lines come to life. All Important. Some lines are Dominant and some Subordinate but all Important. Their real beauty lies in the relationship they establish in the form .

The Expressive Properties of line:

The Expressive Properties of line Form: representational or nonrepresentational Recognition and enjoyment of the work is more likely when the work is understood on the abstract level .

The Expressive Properties of line:

The Expressive Properties of line Organization brings the artist’s message to the forefront. Planned composition.

Line and the other art elements:

Line and the other art elements Line can possess color, value, and texture, and it can create shape. Line can be admired for its own sake.

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape:

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape Contour Lines serves as a continuous edge of a figure, object, or mass. Describe the extremities of shapes or masses. Cross-contours provide information about the nature of the surfaces contained within those edges.

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape:

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape:

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape Modulated lines: Describing the feature of that face by cross-contour. Thick and Thin Irregular and curved Vary the Pressure Vary the Spaces

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape:

Line and the other art elements Line and Shape Separate Shapes, values, textures, and colors.

Line and the other art elements Line and Value:

Line and the other art elements Line and Value Value: The contrast in lightness and darkness that a line exhibits against its background. Light Dark

Line and the other art elements Line and Value:

Line and the other art elements Line and Value Value: Thick or Thin Heavy, wide lines appear dark wile narrow, thin lines appear light. Thin Thick Light Dark

Line and the other art elements Line and Value:

Line and the other art elements Line and Value Value: Varying Spaces Widely spaced lines appear light, and closely spaced lines appear dark. Less More

Line and the other art elements Line and Value:

Line and the other art elements Line and Value Value: Mixture of media

Line and the other art elements Line and Value:

Line and the other art elements Line and Value Hatching is used to produce value.

Line and the other art elements Line and Texture:

Line and the other art elements Line and Texture Groups of lines can combine to produce textures that suggest a visual feeling for the character of the surface. Media and tools.

Line and the other art elements Line and Color:

Line and the other art elements Line and Color C o l o r adds an important expressive potential. Accentuate other properties.

Line and the other art elements Line and Color:

Line and the other art elements Line and Color C o l o r and emotional states. #1 Circle, outside - symbolizes the positive aspects . #2 Circle - the six emotions , three primary and three secondary, represented by their colors. #3 Circle - the negative aspects of each emotion. #4 Circle - Depression, the muddy mixture of all negative emotions.

The Spatial Characteristics of Line:

The Spatial Characteristics of Line Spatial properties. Position  suggests space Va lue  advance and recede Warm colors generally advance Cool colors generally recede

The Spatial Characteristics of Line:

The Spatial Characteristics of Line Line with varied values appear to writhe and twist in space.

The Spatial Characteristics of Line:

The Spatial Characteristics of Line Every factor that produces line has something to say about a line’s location in space. The artist’s job is to use these factors to create spatial order.

The Spatial Characteristics of Line:

The Spatial Characteristics of Line Spatial illusion

Line and Representation:

Line and Representation Line creates representation on both abstract and realistic levels. Objective and Subjective implications.

Line and Representation:

Line and Representation Line suggesting physical presence and psychological character.

Line and Representation:

Line and Representation Line becomes a means for transcribing the expressive language of ideas and emotions . Edges or Contours of shapes Diagrams silhouette Encompasses spaces and area.

Line and Representation:

Line and Representation It depicts facts – an architects plan, an engineers drawing, maps, or words.

Line and Representation:

Line and Representation It expresses actions in a “gestural” sense – past, present and future.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Line and Representation

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 3 Line End

Activity - Line:

Activity - Line Draw a contour (s) of your hand that suggests a message and illustrate it using hatching and cross-hatching . Sign you name and date using calligraphy .

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape The Vocabulary of Shape The Vocabulary of Shape Introduction to Shape The Definition of Shape The Use of Shapes Shape Dimensions The illusions of two-dimensional shapes The illusions of three-dimensional shapes Shape and Principles of Design Balance Direction Duration and relative dominance Harmony and variety Shapes and the space concept Shape and Content

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Shape An area that stands out from the space next to or around it because of a defined or implied boundary or because of differences of value , color , or texture .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS actual shape Clearly defined or positive areas (as opposed to an implied shape).

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS amorphous shape A shape without clarity or definition: formless, indistinct, and of uncertain dimension.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS biomorphic shape Irregular shape that resembles the freely developed curves found in live organisms.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Cubism The name given to the painting style invented by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque between 1907 and 1912, which used multiple views of objects to create the effect of their three-dimensionality while acknowledging the two-dimensional surface of the picture plane.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Cubism Signaling the beginning of abstract art , it is a semiabstract style that continued the strong trend away from representational art initiated by Cezanne in the late 1800s.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS curvilinear Stressing the use of curved lines, as opposed to rectilinear, which stresses straight lines.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS decorative (shape) Ornamenting or enriching but, more importantly in art, stressing the two-dimensional nature of an artwork or any of its elements. Decorative art emphasizes the essential flatness of a surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS equivocal space A condition in which the viewer may, at different times, see more than one set of relationships between art elements or depicted objects . This may be compared to the familiar " optical illusion ."

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS geometric shape A shape that appears related to geometry; usually simple, such as a triangle, rectangle, or circle.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS implied shape A shape suggested or created by the psychological connection of dots, lines, areas, or their edges, creating the visual appearance of a shape that does not physically exist. (See Gestalt.)

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Kinetic art From the Greek word kinesis , meaning "motion," art that involves an element of random or mechanical movement.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Kinetic Art

Kinetic Art:

Kinetic Art

Kinetic Art:

Kinetic Art

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS mass I. In graphic art , a shape that appears to stand out three-dimensionally from the space surrounding it or that appears to create the illusion of a solid body of material . 2. In the plastic arts , the physical bulk of a solid body of material. (See plastic, three-dimensional, and volume.)

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS nonrepresentational art Defines work encompassing nonrecognizable imagery. This ranges from pure abstraction (nonrecognizable but derived from a recognizable object) to nonobjective art (not a product of the abstraction process, but derived from the artist's mind).

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS objective (shape) A type of shape that is based, as nearly as possible, on physical actuality or optical perception . Such art tends to appear natural or real.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS perspective Any graphic system used to create the illusion of three-dimensional images and/or spatial relationships on a two-dimensional surface. There are several types of perspective.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS planar (shape) Having to do with planes.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS plane I. An area that is essentially two- dimensional, having height and width. 2. flat or level surface. 3. A two-dimension surface having a positive extension and spatial direction or position.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS plastic (shape) I. The use of the elements of shape to create the illusion of the third dimension on a two-dimensional surface. 2. Three- dimensional art forms, such as architecture , sculpture , and ceramics .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS rectilinear shape A shape whose boundaries usually consist entirely of straight lines.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS subjective (shape) That which is derived from the mind, reflecting a personal viewpoint, bias, or emotion.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Surrealism A style of artistic expression, influence by Freudian psychology, that emphasize; fantasy and whose subjects are usually experiences revealed by the subconscious mind through the use of automatic techniques.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Surrealism Originally literary movement and an outgrowth of Dadaism, Surrealism was established in 1924.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS three-dimensional (shape) Possessing, or creating the illusion of possessing, the dimension of depth, as well as the dimensions of height and width.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS two-dimensional (shape) Possessing the dimensions of height and width , especially when considering the flat surface or picture plane.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS volume A measurable area of defined or occupied space. (See mass, plastic, and three- dimensional.)

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape The Vocabulary of Shape END

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape Part 1 The Vocabulary of Shape Introduction to Shape The Definition of Shape The Use of Shapes Shape Dimensions The illusions of two-dimensional shapes The illusions of three-dimensional shapes Shape and Principles of Design Balance Direction Duration and relative dominance Harmony and variety Shapes and the space concept Shape and Content

Introduction to Shape:

Introduction to Shape Artists start with preliminary VISION . A SKETCH Lines  Shapes Shapes = Voids Shapes are the building block of art structure.

Introduction to Shape:

Introduction to Shape An art work is never the real thing. The shapes producing the image are never real animals, buildings, people.

Introduction to Shape:

Introduction to Shape SEMIFANTASY. PUREFANTASY. Capable artists are able to convince us that the fantasy is a possible reality .

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Line enclosing an area  Outline or Contour Even when we have few elements our minds adjust to read a visible effect of shape.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape We have an instinctive need for order that enables our minds to fill in the parts that have been left out. Closure is not always an absolutely necessary condition for forming a shape.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Gestalt Psychology Our minds tend to “see” organized wholes, or forms, as a totality, before they perceive the individual parts applied to human visual perception.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Gestalt Psychology Our minds also tend to insist on creating shapes from approximately related elements.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Any visually perceived area of value, texture, color, line , or any combination of these elements.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Pictorial forms of art  Shapes are flat or 2-dimensional 3-dimensional forms of art  sculpture, architecture, environmental design, etc. solids or masses. 3-D 2-D

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Actual shapes Implied shapes Amorphous shapes  vague or delicate that their edges cannot be determined with any degree of exactitude.

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Plastic arts are more defined. Edges Outer contours

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Objective vs. Subjective forms

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Geometric to Biomorphic

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Implied to Amorphous

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Size Position Balance Color Value Texture

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Static Stable Active Lively Contract Expand

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Nonrepresentational or Nonobjective Natural objects generally seem rounded. Organic shapes  Biomorphic Irregular rounded shapes that suggest life.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Definition of Shape

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape Part 1 END

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape Part 2 The Vocabulary of Shape Introduction to Shape The Definition of Shape The Use of Shapes Shape Dimensions The illusions of two-dimensional shapes The illusions of three-dimensional shapes Shape and Principles of Design Balance Direction Duration and relative dominance Harmony and variety Shapes and the space concept Shape and Content

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Surrealism Freudian psychology Exploration of subconscious revelations; dreams

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Definition of Shape

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape Rectilinear Strait-lined shapes  geometric Standardized shapes used in mathematics Cubism Reformulation of the natural world

The Definition of Shape:

The Definition of Shape However shapes are classified, each shape or combination of shapes can display a particular personality according to its physical employment and our responses to it.

The Use of Shapes:

The Use of Shapes Artists use shapes for two fundamental purposes : Suggest a physical form they have seen or imagined. Give certain visual qualities or content to a work of art.

The Use of Shapes:

The Use of Shapes Shapes in art can be used for the following purposes: To achieve order, harmony, and variety To create the illusion of mass, volume, and space on the surface of the picture plane. To extend observer attention or interest span .

The Use of Shapes:

The Use of Shapes Visual Arts  Usually chronologically fixed Music, theater, and dance  Evolve in time TIME Kinetic forms Form of sculpture in motion

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional PLANE The picture plane Planar shape to represent the overall image.

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional Decorative appearance Occupy space Depth  Size, color, value, texture.

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Two-Dimensional Curvilinear Shallow effect Movement into space Depth

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional MASS  The appearance of solid bodies. Volume  Void, occupies a certain amount of measurable space.

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional Rocks and mountains are masses.

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional Holes and valleys are volumes.

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional The illusion of masses or volumes on the picture plane is produced by arranging two or more flat or curvilinear planes in relation to one another.

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional There is no limit to the number of shapes that can be shown in three dimensions. Spheres Pyramids Hexagonal Ovoidal

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional Depth Illusion Appear to recede away from the spectator. Perspective

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional Equivocal space Now you see it and now you don’t Now you see it and now you see it another way Front Back

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shape Dimension - Three-Dimensional

PowerPoint Presentation:

To create order or unity To increase the viewers’ attention spans To alter shapes from their natural appearance Shapes are building block or art structure. Shape and Principles of Design

PowerPoint Presentation:

Artists modify shapes until: The desired degree and type of balance is achieved. The observer’s attention is controlled both in terms of direction and duration. The appropriate ratio of harmony and variety results. The space concept achieves consistency throughout. Shape and Principles of Design

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shapes have different visual weights depending on how they are used. Placing shapes of different sizes at varying distances from the fulcrum can be controlled to create a sense of balance or imbalance. Shape and Principles of Design 1- Balance

PowerPoint Presentation:

Dark value adds weight to a shape Shape and Principles of Design 1- Balance

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Narrow line around reduces the shape’s apparent weight Shape and Principles of Design 1- Balance

PowerPoint Presentation:

Factors controlling directional and tensional force are: Placement Size Accents or emphasis General shape character Shape and Principles of Design 1- Balance

PowerPoint Presentation:

Generate visual forces that direct our eyes Shapes pointing in specific directions Aim edges to imply linkage with other edges Use of intuitive space Shape and Principles of Design 2- Direction

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The direction of the eyes along these paths should be rhythmic. The control of direction helps us to see things in the proper sequence and according to the degree of importance planned for them. Shape and Principles of Design 2- Direction

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Pauses  Equal duration  Monotonous Organize pauses so that their lengths are related to the importance of the sights to be seen on the eye journey. Shape and Principles of Design 3- Duration and Dominance

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The effect of shape’s size can be further modified by manipulation of value, location, color, or any combination of these elements. Shape and Principles of Design 3- Duration and Dominance

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The degree of dominance is usually in direct proportion to the amount of visual contrast. Shape and Principles of Design 3- Duration and Dominance

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Harmony  all things seem to belong together Repetition Likeness Share certain characteristics: Value Texture Color Shape and Principles of Design 4- Harmony and Variety

PowerPoint Presentation:

Variety  Enough difference must exist to make for challenging viewing. Mostly flowing shapes and an angular shape Some difference is essential Excessive differences may be out of tune Repetitive shapes for harmony Contrasting shapes for variety Shape and Principles of Design 4- Harmony and Variety

PowerPoint Presentation:

Flat working surface A “WINDOW” where things appear to be advancing or retreating. Shape and Principles of Design 5- Shapes and Space Concept

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Shapes are often seen as planes. Shapes are seen in perspective Shape and Principles of Design 5- Shapes and Space Concept

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The artist must be consistent with space Balancing the spatial forces 2-D art  weights of the elements 3-D art  thrusting and recession Size and position Values and colors Shape and Principles of Design 5- Shapes and Space Concept

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Representational vs Nonrepresentational use of shapes. 1900s Abstraction 1970’s and 1980’s Conceptual Conception and Imagination Shape and Content

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shape and Content Artists go beyond literal copying and transform object shapes into their personal style or language of form.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Examples Configuration changes a shape’s content or expressive meaning.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shape and Content

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shape and Content

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 4 Shape End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 5 Value The Vocabulary of Value Introduction to Value Relationships Descriptive Uses of Value Expressive Uses of Value Chiaroscuro Tenebrism Printmaking Techniques and Value Decorative Value Compositional Functions of Value Value Patterns Open and Closed Compositions

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 5 Value The Vocabulary of Value The Vocabulary of Value Introduction to Value Relationships Descriptive Uses of Value Expressive Uses of Value Chiaroscuro Tenebrism Printmaking Techniques and Value Decorative Value Compositional Functions of Value Value Patterns Open and Closed Compositions

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Value I. The relative degree of light or dark . 2. The characteristic of color determined by light or dark or the quantity of light reflected by the color. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS achromatic (value) Relating to differences of light and dark. The absence of hue and its intensity.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS cast shadow The dark area that occurs on a surface as a result of something being placed between that surface and a light source .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Chiaroscuro (Chiaroscuro means light and dark in Italian.) I. Distribution of light and dark in a picture. 2. A technique of representation that blends light and shade gradually to create the illusion of three-dimensional objects in space or atmosphere.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS chromatic (value) The value (relative degree of lightness or darkness) demonstrated by a given color .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS closed-value composition Composition in which values are limited by the edges or boundaries of shapes.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS decorative (value) Ornamenting or enriching but, more importantly in art, stressing the two- dimensional nature of an artwork or any of its elements. Decorative art emphasizes the essential flatness of a surface.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS high-key value A value that has a level of middle gray or lighter.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS highlight The portion of an object that, from the observer's position, receives the greatest amount of direct light .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS local value The relative light and dark of a surface, seen in the objective world, that is independent of any effect created by the degree of light falling on it.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS low-key value Any value that has a level of middle gray or darker .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS open-value composition Composition in which values cross over shape boundaries into adjoining areas .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS plastic (value) I. The use of the elements to create the illusion of the third dimension on a two- dimensional surface. 2. Three-dimensional qualities of art forms, such as architecture, sculpture, and ceramics, are enhanced by value.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS shadow, shade, shading The darker value on the surface of an object that gives the illusion that a piece of it is turned away from or obscure the source of light.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS shallow space The illusion of limited depth . With shallow space, the imagery moves on slight distance back from the picture plane.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Tenebrism (Tenebroso or tenebrism is an Italian word, meaning dark and gloomy.) A technique of painting that exaggerate or emphasizes the effects of chiaroscuro .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Tenebrism Larger amounts of dark value are placed close to smaller areas of highly contrasting lights—which change suddenly—in order to concentrate attention on important features .

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS value pattern The arrangement or organization of values that control compositional movement and create a unifying effect throughout a work of art.

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 5 Value The Vocabulary of Value END The Vocabulary of Value Introduction to Value Relationships Descriptive Uses of Value Expressive Uses of Value Chiaroscuro Tenebrism Printmaking Techniques and Value Decorative Value Compositional Functions of Value Value Patterns Open and Closed Compositions

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 5 Value Part 1 The Vocabulary of Value Introduction to Value Relationships Descriptive Uses of Value Expressive Uses of Value Chiaroscuro Tenebrism Printmaking Techniques and Value Decorative Value Compositional Functions of Value Value Patterns Open and Closed Compositions

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships The success of an artwork can be greatly enhanced by an artist who makes good use of lights and darks.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships In Art, Lights and Darks are referred to as VALUE.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships ACHROMATIC values consisting of white, black, and grays . Other terms used for value include TONE, BRIGTNESS, and COLOR. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships The VALUE SCALE Low-key values High-key values The key selected sets the mood of the work.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships Value can be created by placing lines of the same or different qualities alongside or across each other to produce generalized areas of value.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships Value applied will create distinguishable shapes . Shadows and Highlight  Abstract textures Ex. Delicately drawn lines created values.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships The degree of Line Concentration indicates value of the subject.

Introduction to VALUE Relationships:

Introduction to VALUE Relationships CHROMATIC VALUE The lightness and darkness of a color .

Descriptive Uses of VALUE:

Descriptive Uses of VALUE Creating objects, shapes and space. Local VALUES - Naturally occurring values. Descriptive qualities -Psychological, Emotional, and Dramatic expressions .

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Descriptive Uses of VALUE Objects cannot receive light from all directions at the same time. A solid object gets more light from one side than another because that side is closer to the light source.

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Descriptive Uses of VALUE Spherical surface  Even flow Intersecting planes  Sudden contrast

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Descriptive Uses of VALUE CAST SHADOWS – Dark areas that occur on an object or a surface when a shape is placed between it and the light source .

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Descriptive Uses of VALUE

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Descriptive Uses of VALUE CHIAROSCURO Giving emphasis to light and shadow.

Expressive Uses of Values:

Expressive Uses of Values Balance between light and dark. Dark  Atmosphere of gloom, mystery, drama or menace. Light  Opposite

Expressive Uses of Values:

Expressive Uses of Values Lights and shadows exist in nature as the by-products of strictly physical laws.

Expressive Uses of Values:

Expressive Uses of Values Artists must adjust and take liberties with lights and shadows to create their own visual language.

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CHIAROSCURO Leonardo da Vinci , Mona Lisa 1503-06 Exploring chiaroscuro SFUMATO – Soft blending and subtle transitions from light to dark.

CHIAROSCURO:

CHIAROSCURO Technique of representation that makes forceful use of contrasting lights and darks. To create the illusion that the objects are surrounded on all sides by space.

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CHIAROSCURO

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CHIAROSCURO

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TENEBRISM Extreme chiaroscuro! Dark Manner of painting Rembrandt VALUE an instrument in the characteristic exaggeration of Baroque painting.

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TENEBRISM Peculiarities of lighting The way lighting affected mood or emotional expression. Implied light sources in unexpected locations.

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Printmaking Techniques and Value Neglect representation of natural light. Middle Eastern and East Asian art forms. Print making techniques: Intaglio – metal plates Woodcut - wood Lithography – limestone Screen printing – silk

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Decorative Value Ignore conventional light sources or neglect representation of light. Multiple light sources tend to: Flatten object surface. Neutralize the plastic qualities of objects

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Decorative Value

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Compositional Functions of Value Shallow Space Early Cubists. Advancing and Receding characteristics of value.

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Value Patterns Thumbnail sketches. Small scale preliminary value studies. Quickly explore compositional variations before selecting a final solution.

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Open and Closed Compositions CLOSED-VALUE Values are limited by the edges or boundaries of shapes.

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Open and Closed Compositions OPEN-VALUE Values can cross over shape boundaries into adjoining areas.

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 5 Value End

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 6 Texture

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 6 Texture a

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Texture The surface character of a material that can be experienced through touch or the illusion of touch .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS Texture Texture produced by natural forces or through an artist's manipulation of the art elements .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS abstract texture A texture derived from the appearance of an actual surface but rearranged and/or simplified by the artist to satisfy the demands of the artwork.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS accent Any stress or emphasis given to elements of a composition that makes them attract more attention than other features that surround or are close to them.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS accent Accent can be created by a brighter color , darker tone , greater size , or any other means by which a difference is expressed.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS actual texture A surface that can be experienced through the sense of touch (as opposed to a surface visually simulated by the artist).

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS assemblage A technique that brings together individual items of rather bulky three- dimensional nature that are displayed (in situ) in their original position rather than being limited to a wall.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS atmospheric (aerial) perspective The illusion of deep space produced in graphic works by lightening values , softening details and textures , reducing value contrasts , and neutralizing colors in objects as they recede.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS collage A pictorial technique whereby the artist creates the image, or a portion of it, by adhering real materials that possess actual textures to the picture plane surface, often combining them with painted or drawn passages .

Activity 6: Texture Collage:

Activity 6: Texture Collage Create a collage portrait of yourself using paper, fabric, and actual textures on an A3 piece of paper or cardboard. A collage is where an artist glues many objects, fabrics, or pictures of objects together to make a design.

Activity 6: Texture Collage:

Activity 6: Texture Collage Use things cut out from magazines or photographs, pieces of actual objects and fabric, and glue them together to create a collage for which the iconography is your own life story. You should show at least five actual textures and three visual textures on your collage. You can use your own picture as a texture.

Activity 6: Texture Collage:

Activity 6: Texture Collage The size of each piece of texture should not be more than 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”). Actual textures should cover at least 80% of the picture plane, the remaining 20% can be graphics. The theme will be “Who am I?” When done your artwork should summarize your world and who you are.

Ex. Collage Art by Carolyn Holm:

Ex. Collage Art by Carolyn Holm Vulnerable Collage, 8"x10", 2003 The artist was diagnosed with breast cancer in the Spring of 2003. The Vulnerable series was a response to that experience.

Ex. Collage Art by Maguy Savova :

Ex. Collage Art by Maguy Savova

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS genre Subject matter that concerns everyday life , domestic scenes , family relationships , and the like.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS invented texture A created texture whose only source is in the imagination of the artist . It generally produces a decorative pattern and should not be confused with an abstract texture .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS natural texture Texture created as the result of nature's processes .

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS paint quality The use of paint to enrich a surface through textural interest. Interest is created by the ingenuity in handling paint for its intrinsic character.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS papier colle A visual and tactile technique in which scraps of paper having various textures are pasted to the picture surface to enrich or embellish areas.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS papier colle In addition to the actual texture of the paper, the printing on adhered tickets , newspapers , and like functions as visual richness or decorative pattern similar to an artist’s invented texture.

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS:

THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS pattern I. Any artistic design (sometimes serving as a model for imitation). 2. A repeated element and/or design that is usually varied and produces interconnections and obvious directional movements.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS simulated texture A convincing copy or translation of an object's texture in any medium.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS tactile A quality that refers to the sense of touch.

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THE VOCABULARY OF INTRODUCTORY TERMS trompe I'oeil Literally, " deceives the eye "; a technique that copies nature with such exactitude that the subject depicted can be mistaken for natural forms.

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 6 Texture End Part a

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 6 Texture b

Introduction to Texture:

Introduction to Texture Touch something Hands and fingers Looking at something Everything has texture: Glass, carpet, acoustical tiles, … Seen not Felt

Texture and the Visual Arts:

Texture and the Visual Arts Involves 2 sensory processes: Seeing & Touching Viewing a picture and predict its feel. Visual and Tactile experience.

Texture and the Visual Arts:

Texture and the Visual Arts

Texture and the Visual Arts:

2-dimensional or 3-dimensional. Sculptors: choice of material and degree of finish; hair, cloth, skin, … Texture and the Visual Arts

The Nature of Texture:

Touch inform us about immediate surroundings. Smooth – Rough – Soft – Hard. The nature of objects. Texture is surface. The Nature of Texture

The Nature of Texture:

Depends on the degree to which its broken up by its composition. Glossy surfaces reflect the light more evenly, giving less broken appearance. The Nature of Texture

Types of Texture:

4 Basic types of texture: Actual Simulated Abstract Invented Types of Texture

Types of Texture - Actual:

The “real thing”. Looks and feels. We can get a preliminary idea of the feel by viewing the object. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Buildup of paint. Paint Quality. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Application of actual texture involves fixing a textured object or a natural texture to the work surface. The texture represents itself. Picasso and Braque. Picasso 1908: Papier colle’. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Papier colle’ : later expanded to include the use of tickets, portions of newspapers, menus, and the like. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Collage : An art form where actual textures are employed . Simulated textures. Not accepted easily in art; uncertainty . Mixing objects and paintings: what is real- objects or artistic elements or both ? Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Pattern : Arising out of interest in texture. Surface application; aggregate (sand, gravel, …) mixed into the paint to make the surface smoother or rougher. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Actual:

Assemblage : Assemblages usually bring together rather bulky individual items that are displayed in different positions rather than on a wall. Types of Texture - Actual

Types of Texture - Simulated:

LOOKS real but in fact is not; copying . Flemish artists produced naturalistic effects in still-life and genre paintings. Interior designers painting “faux” fake surface treatments of imitation stone or marble. Types of Texture - Simulated

Types of Texture - Simulated:

trompe l’oeil: “fool the eye”. Types of Texture - Simulated

Types of Texture - Abstract:

HINT of the original texture. Simplified version of the original, emphasizing pattern. Decorative. Accent or diminish areas. Control movement. Types of Texture - Abstract

Types of Texture - Invented:

Textures without precedent. The creation of the artist’s imagination. Appear in abstract works. Entirely nonobjective. Abstracted vs Invented. Types of Texture - Invented

Texture and Pattern:

Texture vs. Pattern Pattern is not concerned with surface feel but with appearance . Pattern serves as ornament independent from any tactile possibilities. Texture and Pattern

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Texture and Pattern Texture Pattern Both Texture & Pattern

Texture and Pattern:

Pattern suggests repetition; random or controlled. Aerial view shows pattern. Closer view shows texture. Pattern is 2-D Texture is 3-D Texture and Pattern

Texture and Composition Relative Dominance and Movement:

Texture is variation of light and dark that is exciting and attractive. Our attention is constantly being maneuvered about the surface of an artwork by the degree of emphasis given to the various areas of that surface. Texture and Composition Relative Dominance and Movement

Texture and Composition Psychological factors:

Texture can provoke psychological or emotional responses . Pleasant or Unpleasant. Environments. Experiences. Objects. Persons. Symbolic or associative meanings . The artist can also use textures to simulate our curiosity , shock us , or make us reevaluate our perceptions . Texture and Composition Psychological factors

Texture and Space:

Texture can help to define space. When textures appear blurred and lack strong contrasts , they make objects seem distant . When they are sharp and have strong contrasts , the objects appear move forward . Atmospheric Perspective Texture and Space

Texture and Space:

Texture and Space

Texture and Art Media:

The architect balances the smoothness of steel and glass with the roughness of stone, concrete, and brick. The ceramist. Jewelers. Printmakers. Sculptors. Texture is involved in all forms. Texture and Art Media

Texture and Art Media:

Texture and Art Media

Texture and Art Media:

Texture and Art Media

Texture and Art Media:

Texture and Art Media

Art Fundamentals:

Art Fundamentals Chapter 6 Texture End

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