Examples of Existence

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Slide 1: 

examples of existence Published in 1957, Atlas Shrugged was her greatest achievement and last work of fiction. In this novel she dramatized her unique philosophy in an intellectual mystery story that integrated ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, economics and sex. Ayn Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on February 2, 1905. Taken from an extended passage, originally found in Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand , but here quoted from a lecture given to Yale University. Click each slide to proceed…

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There is only one fundamental alternative in the universe: existence or non-existence—and it pertains to a single class of entities: to living organisms.  The existence of inanimate matter is unconditional, the existence of life is not: it depends on a specific course of action. Matter is indestructible, it changes its forms, but it cannot cease to exist.  It is only a living organism that faces a constant alternative: the issue of life or death...…

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….. Life is a process of self-sustaining and self-generated action.  If an organism fails in that action, it dies; its chemical elements remain, but its life goes out of existence. It is only the concept of ‘Life’ that makes the concept of ‘Value’ possible.  It is only to a living entity that things can be good or evil.

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A plant must feed itself in order to live; the sunlight, the water, the chemicals it needs are the values its nature has set it to pursue; its life is the standard of value directing its actions.  But a plant has no choice of action; there are alternatives in the conditions it encounters, but there is no alternative in its function: it acts automatically to further its life, it cannot act for its own destruction.

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An animal is equipped for sustaining its life; its senses provide it with an automatic code of action, an automatic knowledge of what is good for it or evil. It has no power to extend its knowledge or to evade it.  In conditions where its knowledge proves inadequate, it dies.

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Man has no automatic code of survival.  His particular distinction from all other living species is the necessity to act in the face of alternatives by means of volitional choice. He has no automatic knowledge of what is good for him or evil, what values his life depends on, what course of action it requires. Are you prattling about an instinct of self-preservation?  An instinct of self-preservation is precisely what man does not possess…..

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An ‘instinct’ is an unerring and automatic form of knowledge.  A desire is not an instinct.  A desire to live does not give you the knowledge required for living. And even man’s desire to live is not automatic: your secret evil today is that that is the desire you do not hold.  Your fear of death is not a love for life and will not give you the knowledge needed to keep it.

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Man must obtain his knowledge and choose his actions by a process of thinking, which nature will not force him to perform.  Man has the power to act as his own destroyer—and that is the way he has acted through most of his history….