Phosphorus cycle

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By: 21009 (39 month(s) ago)

please send me a copy of your power point presentation bout phosphorus at nancypayumo@yahoo.com.thank

By: 21009 (39 month(s) ago)

please send me a copy of your power point presentation bout phosphorus at nancypayumo@yahoo.com.thank

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Slide 1: 

e h P h o s p h o r u s C y L E T C

On the Periodic table… : 

On the Periodic table…

Slide 3: 

Phosphorus in living organisms Phosphorus in soil, Fresh water & streams Phosphate in rocks DECOMPOSERS EROSION Adsorption by roots and Assimilation FRESH WATER AND OCEAN DEPOSITS THE PHOSPHORUS CYCLE

The Phosphorus Cycle in the Ecosystem : 

The Phosphorus Cycle in the Ecosystem

The phosphorus cycle in the ocens : 

The phosphorus cycle in the ocens

The phosphorus cycle on the lithosphere : 

The phosphorus cycle on the lithosphere

Slide 7: 

The phosphorus cycle describes the movement of phosphorus through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The atmosphere does not play a significant role, because phosphorus and phosphorus-based compounds are usually solids at the typical ranges of temperature and pressure found on Earth. Phosphorus normally occurs in nature as part of a phosphate ion, consisting of a phosphorus atom and some number of oxygen atoms, the most abundant form (called orthophosphate) having four oxygen atoms: PO43-. Most phosphates are found as salts in ocean sediments or in rocks. Over time, geologic processes can bring ocean sediments to land, and weathering will carry terrestrial phosphates back to the ocean. Plants absorb phosphates from the soil and phosphate enters the food chain. After death, the animal or plant decays, and the phosphates are returned to the soil. Runoff may carry them back to the ocean or they may be reincorporated into rock. The primary biological importance of phosphates is as a component of nucleotides, which serve as energy storage within cells (ATP) or when linked together, form the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. Phosphorus is also found in bones, and in phospholipids (found in all biological membranes). The phosphorus cycle describes the movement of phosphorus through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The atmosphere does not play a significant role, because phosphorus and phosphorus-based compounds are usually solids at the typical ranges of temperature and pressure found on Earth. Phosphorus normally occurs in nature as part of a phosphate ion, consisting of a phosphorus atom and some number of oxygen atoms, the most abundant form (called orthophosphate) having four oxygen atoms: PO43-. Most phosphates are found as salts in ocean sediments or in rocks. Over time, geologic processes can bring ocean sediments to land, and weathering will carry terrestrial phosphates back to the ocean. Plants absorb phosphates from the soil and phosphate enters the food chain. After death, the animal or plant decays, and the phosphates are returned to the soil. Runoff may carry them back to the ocean or they may be reincorporated into rock. The primary biological importance of phosphates is as a component of nucleotides, which serve as energy storage within cells (ATP) or when linked together, form the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. Phosphorus is also found in bones, and in phospholipids (found in all biological membranes).

Slide 8: 

Phosphates move quickly through plants and animals; however, the processes that move them through the soil or ocean are very slow, making the phosphorus cycle overall one of the slowest biogeochemical cycles. Human influence: Artificial fertilizers and other wastes not absorbed by plants mostly enter the groundwater and collect in streams, lakes and ponds. The extra phosphates are a major contributor to the process called eutrophication, which causes excessive growth of water plants and algae populations and subsequent depletion of dissolved oxygen potentially suffocating fish and other aquatic fauna. Phosphates move quickly through plants and animals; however, the processes that move them through the soil or ocean are very slow, making the phosphorus cycle overall one of the slowest biogeochemical cycles. Human influence: Artificial fertilizers and other wastes not absorbed by plants mostly enter the groundwater and collect in streams, lakes and ponds. The extra phosphates are a major contributor to the process called eutrophication, which causes excessive growth of water plants and algae populations and subsequent depletion of dissolved oxygen potentially suffocating fish and other aquatic fauna.