EDX3270 Assignment 1

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Annotations and an overview of ten linked literacy articles. The link between the articles is Multiliteracies. By Courtney Poole

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EDX3270 Assignment 1 Annotations & Overview Multiliteracies:

EDX3270 Assignment 1 Annotations & Overview Multiliteracies Courtney Poole 0050101547

Annotation 1:

Annotation 1 Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Defining multiliteracies. In M. Anstey & G. Bull (Eds.), Teaching and learning multiliteracies: Changing times, changing literacies (pp. 19-55). doi: 10.1598/0872075863 This chapter explains what literacy itself is. It discusses the way in which multiliteracies emerged throughout literacy programs in classrooms. Cazden (1967) and Gee (1992) are examined as to their involvement in the creation of multiliteracies. The central topic of the chapter is the influences of multiliteracy practices within the education environment and its benefits to all students. Luke and Freebody’s, Four Resources Model is also examined within the chapter to discuss its use in the multiliteracies pedagogy. It is also learnt that to be multiliterate, you must recognise certain qualities and be able to use different and new practices in literacy. To view a Woordle of Annotation 1 click here.

Annotation 2:

Annotation 2 Cumming-Potvin, W. (2009). Social justice, pedagogy and multiliteracies: Developing communities of practice for teacher education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 34(1), 82- 99. This article explains different aspects of literacy involving social interaction. A case study of a Sally, a new teacher, is followed. In the beginning Sally follows the theorist Vygotsky, Piaget, Lave and Wagner and their theories when teacher her class. Sally’s class is highly diverse and she soon discovers the use of the multiliteracies pedagogy to be more beneficial for her class. The article follows the case through its challenges and finally successful use of multiliteracies. Both teacher and students benefit greatly from the approach and critical, life long literacy skills are developed, while confidence and experience is also developed. To view a Woordle of Annotation 2 click here.

Annotation 3:

Annotation 3 Dooley, K. (2008). Multiliteracies and pedagogies of new learning for students of English as an additional language. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 102-125). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. This chapter explains the difference and diversity being the core of multiliteracy thinking. The Learning by Design Model of Kalantzis and Cope is examined and the early ideas of multiliteracies are fore-fronted. Pennycook looks at the use of multiliteracies with Japanese students. The chapter follows the use of multiliteracies in an evolving community and the challenges it faces. For students that have English as an additional language, the use of multiliteracies is beneficial with the use of diversity within the classroom. Other features are examined throughout the chapter and the use of multiliteracies is deemed successful in this case. To view a Woordle of Annotation 3 click here.

Annotation 4:

Annotation 4 EDX2170 English curriculum and pedagogy: Planning for literacy learning (2010). Toowoomba: University of Southern Queensland. In this article the multiliteracies pedagogy is introduced. Luke and Freebody describe their belief that literacy is flexible and sustainable and that provides a person with skills and knowledge of texts. Multiliteracy is described as being diverse and multimodal. Anstey and Bull, define multiliteracies with a wide range of abilities to be used in socially and diverse contexts. The New London Groups research is explained and the four practices of multiliteracies are each introduced and explained. The use of multiliteracies in classrooms is deemed important and useful to cater for diversity. To view a Woordle of Annotation 4 click here.

Annotation 5:

Annotation 5 Healy, A. (2006). Multiliteracies: teachers and students at work in new ways with literacy. In R. Campbell, & D. Green (Eds.), Literacy and learners (191-244). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. In this chapter the diversity of primary school students is explained. Classroom practices regarding literacy is discussed and found to culturally valued. It is explained the practical and pedagogical acceptance of multiliteracies is not negotiable within the school environment. A case study of a grade two class is witnessed as they become skilled in multiliteracies. It is explained that both parents and teachers play a vital role in the development of skills. The case study is successful and it is explained that teachers need to respectful of diverse student needs and the multiple forms of texts needed to develop multiliteracy skills. To view a Woordle of Annotation 5 click here.

Annotation 6:

Annotation 6 Henderson, R. (2008). Mobilising multiliteracies: Pedagogy for mobile students. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 168- 200). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. This chapter explores the use of multiliteracies with mobile students within Australia’s education system. Henderson explains how many students often move schools giving both the teacher and students advantages and disadvantages. It can also be a resource for teachers. Multiliteracies takes into account the challenges of incorporating mobile students and attempts to provide opportunities for all students. It is however found that it is not always successful. Learning by Design Model (Kalantzis and Cope, 2005) is examined deemed a model to be used with mobile students and multiliteracies. The chapter finds that using multiliteracies with mobile students is a great way to teach literacy education. To view a Woordle of Annotation 6 click here.

Annotation 7:

Mills, K. (2006). Critical framing in a pedagogy of multiliteracies. In Proceedings of Australian Literacy Educator’s Association/Australian Association of the Teaching of English National Conference: Voices, Vibes, Visions. Darwin: Australia. This conference article looks at the policies and research that push the importance of multiliteracies. The pedagogy of the New London Group is examined looking at the four components of multiliteracies. The article stresses the importance of a rapidly changing global context for diversity within classrooms. A case study examines a grade six class and the teacher’s use of multiliteracies within the classroom. The findings of the case study are quite astonishing. Kalantzis and Cope (2005) are also examined with the use of the Learning by Design model within the class environment. The significance of multiliteracies is made prominent throughout the article. Annotation 7 To view a Woordle of Annotation 7 click here.

Annotation 8:

Annotation 8 Tan, J. P. (2008). Closing the gap: A multiliteracies approach to English language teaching for ‘at-risk’ students in Singapore. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 144- 167). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. This chapter explains how multiliteracies forces teachers to ‘take cultural differences seriously’. The use of the multiliteracies framework is implemented within a Singapore school. A brief history of the Singapore education system is followed by the implementation of multiliteracies within the classroom. Following the implementation, many personal and academic achievements throughout the school community. The implementation is deemed a success and there is an increased awareness of student diversity, strengths and needs. Also it is explained that although the framework is successful, large amounts of time, effort and participation of all is needed to achieve it. To view a Woordle of Annotation 8 click here.

Annotation 9:

Annotation 9 Tan, J. P., & McWilliam, E. (2009). From literacy to multiliteracies: Diverse learners and pedagogical practice. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 4(3), 213-225. This article explores the use of multiliteracies in diverse classroom environments. It looks at two different classrooms environments and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of multiliteracies. The difference between the two environments, rural and urban, is quite vast and interesting. Each school community shares opinions and ideas on multiliteracies, however many also vary. The article stresses the importance of diversity amongst students and teaching methods, while advocating that although multiliteracies can be effective in one school, it will not necessarily work in all school communities. To view a Woordle of Annotation 9 click here.

Annotation 10:

Annotation 10 Unsworth, L. (2001). Changing contexts of text and image in classroom practice. In L. Unsworth (Eds.), Teaching multiliteracies across the curriculum (pp. 1-20). Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press. In this chapter the changing dimensions of school literacy is explained. Literacy today is examined and the issues of a changing society are discussed. It is understood that to be multiliterate, students must be able to understand certain skills and this is required before knowledge can be widened greatly. It is found that literacy is influenced by many interactions within the classroom, school, community and global context. The New London Group is introduced and describes aspects needed to support a multiliteracy framework. It also explains that sophisticated planning needs to be implemented to achieve a successful literacy classroom. To view a Woordle of Annotation 10 click here.

Overview :

Overview When examining the area of literacy within a classroom context, it is important for all teachers to have a deep understanding. After careful examination of ten articles from course readings, journal articles and literacy supported material, there is an obvious link being multiliteracies and the multiliteracies pedagogy. Throughout the articles, it is commonly found that multiliteracies education is more widely used due to the greater diversity of students and the rapidly changing world. Teachers are becoming increasingly aware of the diversity with many embracing the pedagogy while few struggle. Examining articles that involve case studies, it is interesting to compare advantages and disadvantages of using multiliteracies in different contexts. The common link between the annotations is the multiliteracy pedagogy. Luke and Freebody are commonly mentioned in all articles, however, in the Planning for Literacy Learning article, multiliteracy is described as being diverse and multimodal (EDX2170., p. 4, 2010). It is important for literacy to include this pedagogy as it is useful for diverse and multicultural classrooms. The importance of catering for diverse needs is explained in the article ‘Multiliteracies and Pedagogies of New Learning for Students with English as an Additional Language’ (Dooley, K., pp 102-125, 2008) ‘Teaching at Risk Students in Singapore’ (Tan, J. P,. pp 144-167, 2008).

Slide 13:

Throughout the articles the importance of catering for all students is prominent. It is explained that it is important to teach literacy multimodal, through both group and individual work, while catering for all learning needs. The case studies, being from rural, urban, Australian and non-Australian schools, each have disadvantages and advantages of teaching using the multiliteracies pedagogy. Multiliteracies, like all teaching strategies, were found to work in some classrooms and not others. Luke and Freebody’s ‘Four Resources Model’, Kalantzis and Cope’s ‘Learning by Design Model’ and the New London Group, are often mentioned. The four resources model which includes the code breaker, text participant, text user and text analysis, are often mentioned as being a useful strategy in aiding the multiliteracies pedagogy.

Slide 14:

It is also found that the traditional approach to teaching literacy is being more commonly pushed towards a modern approach with the use if technology, multimodal teaching and multiliteracies. For a successful multiliteracy approach in classrooms, the articles discovered that teachers need to be flexible and open to diverse student needs. The strategies used to teach students also need to be flexible. I believe that the multiliteracies pedagogy and its elements are explained within the articles is useful for all teachers. It is insightful information and is useful when teaching in a rapidly changing world. I believe that these articles are particularly useful for anyone who would like to learn more about the multiliteracies pedagogy.

References:

References Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Defining multiliteracies. In M. Anstey & G. Bull (Eds.), Teaching and learning multiliteracies: Changing times, changing literacies (pp. 19-55). doi: 10.1598/0872075863 Cumming-Potvin, W. (2009). Social justice, pedagogy and multiliteracies: Developing communities of practice for teacher education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 34(1), 82- 99. Dooley, K. (2008). Multiliteracies and pedagogies of new learning for students of English as an additional language. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 102-125). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. EDX2170 English curriculum and pedagogy: Planning for literacy learning (2010). Toowoomba: University of Southern Queensland. Healy, A. (2006). Multiliteracies: teachers and students at work in new ways with literacy. In R. Campbell, & D. Green (Eds.), Literacy and learners (191-244). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia.

Slide 16:

Henderson, R. (2008). Mobilising multiliteracies: Pedagogy for mobile students. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 168-200). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. Mills, K. (2006). Critical framing in a pedagogy of multiliteracies. In Proceedings of Australian Literacy Educator’s Association/Australian Association of the Teaching of English National Conference: Voices, Vibes, Visions. Darwin: Australia. Tan, J. P. (2008). Closing the gap: A multiliteracies approach to English language teaching for ‘at-risk’ students in Singapore. In A. Healy (Eds.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education (pp. 144-167). Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. Tan, J. P., & McWilliam, E. (2009). From literacy to multiliteracies: Diverse learners and pedagogical practice. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 4(3), 213-225. Unsworth, L. (2001). Changing contexts of text and image in classroom practice. In L. Unsworth (Eds.), Teaching multiliteracies across the curriculum (pp. 1-20). Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press.

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