basic building blocks for society

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Basic Building Blocks for society : 

Basic Building Blocks for society A Brief Introduction

Basic Building Blocksfor Any Society : 

Basic Building Blocksfor Any Society 2

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3

Outline for this Presentation : 

Outline for this Presentation 4 INTRODUCTORY STUFF FAMILY Basic Issues Nurture Kinship Economics Gender & Sexuality Family and the Other Building Blocks

Outline for this Presentation (2) : 

Outline for this Presentation (2) COMMUNITY Extension of Family Extra-Familial Identities Status and Community AUTHORITY Who has Authority and Why? What is the Extent of the Authority? What is the Nature of the Authority? Examples 5

Outline for this Presentation (3) : 

Outline for this Presentation (3) CELEBRATION Rites and Rituals that mark Transitions Establishment of Calendar Identity NATURE Who determines the relationship with Nature? What is the History of the relationship? Physical spaces of interaction with Nature Antonyms for Nature? 6

SOME INTRODUCTORY STUFF : 

SOME INTRODUCTORY STUFF These Basic Building Blocks Apply Both To Cultures And To Sub-cultures 7 NBTS Students Board Administration Faculty Staff

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NBTS Board Each of these “groups” functions, to some extent, as a sub-culture within the “culture” of NBTS. 8 Some of the “groups” overlap. Students Staff Administration Faculty

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NBTS Students Board Administration Faculty Staff 9 Surrounding Culture(s) Surrounding Culture(s)

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Make a list of the cultures/sub-cultures you participate in. Students NBTS Board Administration Faculty Staff 10 Students Students Surrounding Culture(s) Surrounding Culture(s)

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NBTS Board Administration Faculty Staff 11 Surrounding Culture(s) Surrounding Culture(s) Which of those “cultures” do you bring INTO the seminary with you? Students Students

Differences among Us : 

Differences among Us Thus, here at NBTS, we have competing ideas about … Family Community Authority Celebration Nature 12 AND . . . Within Us!!

Family : 

Family 13

Family : 

Family 14 How does the society define “family”? How does the society provide for the family? How does the family provide for the society?

Family : 

15 Basic Issues Nurture Kinship Economics Gender & Sexuality Family and the Other Building Blocks Family

Family : 

16 Basic Issues Nurture Kinship Economics Gender & Sexuality Family and the Other Building Blocks Family

Family – Basic Issues : 

Nurture, Kinship, and Economics Issues of Gender and Sexuality are also “folded into” this category Deeply connected to ALL the other categories -- Often constitute some of the assumptions of the other categories Family – Basic Issues 17

Family - Nurture : 

18 Primarily of young, but also of the ailing or aged. This task is often (though not always) assigned to a female (or group of females). The nurturer does not necessarily have to be the one who sired or gave birth to the child. E.g., grandparents, aunts, uncles, community, siblings. Thus nurture of youth is not dependent on heterosexual reproduction. The Family is the site for Primary Socialization. Family - Nurture

Family - Kinship : 

19 Kinship defines those relations that are prescribed, not chosen. Often determines inheritance – see below on Economics. This is particularly important in cultures where land is a primary resource (e.g., farming communities). Kinship contributes substantially to identity and to “emergency aid” provision. Who can you call in a crisis? Family - Kinship

Family - Economics : 

20 In most cultures, the Family/Household is the basic economic unit. E.g., Hunting and Gathering Agricultural Small Merchant Shops Thus, WIVES (in patriarchal cultures) and CHILDREN are economic resources (material goods; ownership), as are SLAVES (for many cultures). The family/household is, for most cultures, an institution of enslavement, though often articulated in terms of intimacy and care. Family - Economics

Family – Gender & Sexuality : 

21 Gender Roles are determined IN THE FAMILY, often rooted in a culture’s economic structure & history. POWER AND PRIVILEGE IS LEARNED IN THE FAMILY. Gender and Sexuality is the primary “battleground” for power and privilege. Race and Class rest on Gender learnings. Sexual mores are often the result of the three “basic issues” of family: nurture, kinship, economics, with the economics being the primary issue. This includes sexual mores regarding, for example, adultery, incest, pre- and extra-marital sexual intercourse, the double standard for men and women, and, to some degree, homosexuality and hermaphroditism. Family – Gender & Sexuality

Family and the other Building blocks : 

22 Community -- Notions (beliefs, practices) of Community are often built upon the model of Family Relationships. “Brothers & Sisters in Christ” The Community is the site for Secondary Socialization. Authority -- Power issues are first experienced and learned in the Family/Household. Celebration -- Often primary celebrations (rituals, rites) occur IN and FOR the Family (birthdays, deathdays, funerals, many religious initiation rites). Nature -- An individual’s primary relation to nature is often determined in the family, i.e., in one’s primary socialization. Family and the other Building blocks

Talk with a Partnerabout Family : 

In “My Building Blocks,” you explored what your cultural context assumes about Family. Now – name ONE place where YOUR OWN assumptions about Family are at odds with the view of Family taught to you by your family of origin. Talk with a Partnerabout Family 23 7 minutes

Community : 

Community 24

Community : 

Community 25 What are the “moments” of community (time)? What are the primary “spaces” of community (space)? Who is included in or excluded from the community (boundaries)?

Community : 

Community 26 Community as an Extension of Family Extra-Familial Identities Status and Community

Community : 

Community Community as an Extension of Family Secondary Socialization (Nurture) Extension of Kinship from clan to tribe, etc.; compare ethnicity with notions of nationality through marriage (both one’s own and one’s children or siblings) The primary site of Economic exchange 27

Community : 

Community Extra-Familial Identities Friendships Associations Status and Community Reciprocity (e.g., Gift cultures; equal reciprocity; status-based reciprocity) Status Mobility Honor and Shame Patronage Systems 28

Talk with a Partnerabout Community : 

In “My Building Blocks,” you explored what your cultural context assumes about Community. Now – name ONE place where YOUR OWN assumptions about Community are at odds with the views of Community held by your congregation. Talk with a Partnerabout Community 29 7 minutes

Authority : 

Authority 30

Authority : 

Authority 31 Who or What has Authority and over Whom? How is Authority Exercised? What foundational stories/myths establish the Authority?

Authority : 

Authority 32 Who has Authority and Why? Which Parent? Other Family? Teachers? Ministers? Law? Scripture? “Good Sense”? What others see? What is the extent of any particular Authority? Who can override the Parent? Authority over the Mind? Over the Body? Over the Future? What is the nature of any particular Authority? Constructive and Creative? Or Destructive and Repressive? Collaborative? Or Tyrannical/Individualistic?

Authority : 

Authority 33 Some Examples – Patriarchal Authority – Roman Paterfamilias Legal Authority – Can the legal authority (judge) override the family authority (paterfamilias)? Real or Unreal? – Does the “Authority” have the capacity to affect an individual’s (or community’s) life circumstances in the present time and space? (e.g., throw you in jail; kill you) Or is the “Authority” related to some “idea” or future construct (e.g., send you to hell or heaven).

Talk with a Partnerabout Authority : 

See if you can discover at least ONE way In which you and your discussion partner DIFFER in your views of Authority. This may be difficult to do in a short time period. Start by identifying one key CULTURAL difference between yourselves and go from there … Talk with a Partnerabout Authority 34 7 minutes

Celebration : 

Celebration 35

Celebration : 

Celebration 36 What rituals are celebrated? What do the rituals celebrate? Who participates in the rituals?

Celebration : 

Celebration 37 RITES or RITUALS that mark significant TRANSITIONS Birth Adolescent – Coming of Age Marriage Death

Celebration : 

Celebration 38 Establishment of CALENDAR – and thus relation to TIME (Cyclical and/or Linear) New Year Harvest / Thanksgiving Nature Transitions (Solstice; Equinox) Birthdays and Anniversaries

Celebration : 

Celebration 39 IDENTITY National or Ethnic Birthdays Victories (Wars; Military Conquests) Other National/Ethnic Markers

Talk with a Partnerabout Celebration : 

What is your favorite memory of CELEBRATION? What is your greatest disappointment regarding the lack or failure of Celebration in your life? Talk with a Partnerabout Celebration 40 7 minutes

Nature : 

Nature 41

Nature : 

Nature 42 What is the relationship of the Community to Nature? What is the relationship of the Family to Nature? How is Nature defined and experienced?

Nature : 

Nature 43 Which defines the primary relation to Nature, Community or Family? Is the relation to Nature . . . primarily an Economic matter or primarily a Religious/Philosophical matter, or both?

Nature : 

Nature 44 How does the history of the society reflect its relation to nature? What are the primary PHYSICAL spaces of interaction with Nature? What are the primary ANTONYMS for Nature?

Talk with a Partnerabout Nature : 

Talk about how our society understands the relationship of CITIES to NATURE? Can you think of other ways to understand that relationship? Talk with a Partnerabout Nature 45 7 minutes

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