Global Warming & Public Health

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Global Warming And Public Health : 

Global Warming And Public Health Vijay Diwan Nisarg Mitra Mandal, Aurangabad

The Sun and The Earth : 

The Sun and The Earth The Sun A smaller, G2 star made of hydrogen, helium & other trace elements. Surface temperature 6000° K with UV & IR radiation. The Earth The third planet orbitting around the sun in a cycle of eccentricity. Its diameter at equator is 12,756.32 kilometers. Supports life forms.

The thin atmosphere of the earthKarman line at 100 kms : 

The thin atmosphere of the earthKarman line at 100 kms The green house gases : CO2 : 0.03 % Ozone : 0.000004 % Vapour : 0 to 4 % Methane : 0.0002 % N2 Oxides : 0.00003 % C F Cs : 463100 tons (1987) 134100 tons (2000) HFCs, PFCs : 27000 tons (2004)

CO2 & Greenhouse gases’ emissionPreindustrial era CO2 concentration : 280 ppmLast 200 years CO2 concentration : 376 00mFossil fuel burning and deforestation during last two centuries has caused a greater emission of CO2 & greenhouse gases. : 

CO2 & Greenhouse gases’ emissionPreindustrial era CO2 concentration : 280 ppmLast 200 years CO2 concentration : 376 00mFossil fuel burning and deforestation during last two centuries has caused a greater emission of CO2 & greenhouse gases.

Slide 5: 

1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 310 320 340 360 370 380 Carbon Dioxide Concentration (ppmv) 330 350 390

Slide 6: 

6

The global warming IPCC : Rise in earth’s surface temperatures during last 100 years - 0.18° C to 0.74° C : 

The global warming IPCC : Rise in earth’s surface temperatures during last 100 years - 0.18° C to 0.74° C 7

Global Warming :Impacts on Public Health : 

Global Warming :Impacts on Public Health Climate change will cause rise in temperature from 1.8°C to 4°C in the next century (United Nations climate panel report ) South Asia is most vulnerable: home to one-sixth of humanity, with low-lying countries, glaciers, deserts, & thickly populated coastal cities. Impacts to human health: Vector-borne and water-borne diseases, thermal stress, dehydration, malnutrition & plant diseases. (WHO’s South Asia Env. Health Advisor -Alex Hildebrand)

Impacts on Public Health : 

Impacts on Public Health Rise in temperature: Kathmandu in Nepal, Timpu in Bhutan, and sub-himalayan India will be more susceptible to mosquito-borne diseases like malaria, filaria, dengue and Japanese encephalitis, skin cancer, chiknagunya and tick-borne diseases. Floods and water-logging: Severe instances of Cholera and diarrhoea at places like Bangladesh, West Bengal, and coastal cities like Mumbai, Goa and Chennai. Droughts and heat waves: Adversely affect crops, increase water scarcity, and push up respiratory diseases & kidney stones. (WHO’s South Asia Env. Health Advisor - Alex Hildebrand)

How should we react ? : 

How should we react ? Sanitation measures ? - Population explosion and poverty upset these. Chemical control of vectors? - Successively built up resistance to pesticides defeats that. Biological control of vectors? -Topical and inadequate measure. Control through environment management ? - Clearing the breeding sites of mosquitoes and other vectors, reducing carbon emission, changing lifestyle a little, and adopting a sustainable model for development.

What should we do ? : 

What should we do ? Mitigation measures: Shift to renewable energy. Migration of coastal populations. Increasing public transportation. Aiming at 33% of land under forests. Reduction in energy usage. Setting up personal, social and industrial targets for CO2 release. Adaptation measures: rainwater harvesting, solar traffic signals and street lights, solar heaters, car pooling, walking the short distances, and minimising energy needs.

If they could do it, why wouldn’t we? : 

If they could do it, why wouldn’t we?

authorStream Live Help