PRESENTATION ON DISASTER MANAGEMENT

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WELCOME TO : 

WELCOME TO THE PRESENTATION ON DISASTER MANAGEMENT IN INDIA: A STUDY OF VULNERABILITY, AWARENESS AND RESPONSE MANAGEMENT BY INSP. SANJAY DHIMAN

RESEARCH SUPERVISOR : 

RESEARCH SUPERVISOR Dr.B.S Bhatia,Sr.Professor & Director,RIMT-IMCT , Mandigobindgarh

Slide 3: 

INTRODUCTION

DISASTER : 

DISASTER WHO defines disasters as ‘any occurrences that cause damage, economic destruction, loss of human life and deterioration in health and health services on a scale sufficient to warrant an extraordinary response from outside the effected community or area’.

TYPES OF DISASTERS : 

TYPES OF DISASTERS 1. NATURAL 2. ANTHROPOGENIC (MAN MADE) 3. HYBRID

NATURAL DISASTERS : 

NATURAL DISASTERS These are the result of natural phenomenon, for instance, tsunami, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, tornadoes, avalanches floods etc.

Tsunami 26th Dec, 2004 : 

Tsunami 26th Dec, 2004

Bhuj Earthquake : 

Bhuj Earthquake

Major Earthquake is Due along Indian-Eurasian tectonic fault line… - Study of specialists from the University of Colorado,US and Indian Institute of Astrophysics,Banglore in year 2001. : 

Major Earthquake is Due along Indian-Eurasian tectonic fault line… - Study of specialists from the University of Colorado,US and Indian Institute of Astrophysics,Banglore in year 2001. Major cities in the line of threat are: Delhi Kolkata Lucknow Islamabad Kathmandu, Dhaka and Thimpu

ANTHROPOGENIC DISASTERS : 

ANTHROPOGENIC DISASTERS These are the result of man’s interaction with the artificial environment he has himself created.

WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION : 

WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION WMD – Nuclear, Radiological, Biological, Chemical, or Explosive Weapons Intended to Create Mass Casualties, Have a Demoralizing Psychological Impact Upon the Populace, and Cause a Loss of Confidence in the Government.

THE MYTHS : 

THE MYTHS It can’t happen to us WMD agents are so deadly the victims will all die anyway There is nothing we can do

WHY WMD TERRORISM : 

WHY WMD TERRORISM Agents are available & relatively easy to manufacture Large amount not needed in enclosed spaces WMD incident difficult to recognize Can impact large areas Psychological trauma Can overwhelm existing resources

WMD MATERIAL SOURCES : 

WMD MATERIAL SOURCES Home Production Laboratory / Commercial Production Industrial Facilities Foreign Military Sources Medical / University Research Facilities

POTENTIAL TERRORISTS TARGETS : 

POTENTIAL TERRORISTS TARGETS Enclosed spaces Large crowds ( high profile events ) Critical facilities and infrastructure Accessible facilities with significant hazard / damage potential Facilities of interest to terrorists’ cause

POTENTIAL PROBABILITY/IMPACT : 

POTENTIAL PROBABILITY/IMPACT POTENTIAL IMPACT PROBABILITY/LIKELIHOOD NUCLEAR WEAPON IMPROVISED NUCLEAR DEVICE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL CHEMICAL AGENT OR TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL AGENT BLAST EVENT

HYBRID DISASTERS : 

HYBRID DISASTERS It arises from a linkage of anthropogenic (man-made) events and natural events

CASUAL FACTORS OF DISASTERS : 

CASUAL FACTORS OF DISASTERS 1. POVERTY 2. POPULATION EXPLOSION 3. RAPID URBANISATION 4. ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION 5. POOR POLICY PROFILES 6. LACK OF AWARENESS AMONG COMMON PEOPLE

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DISASTERS AND DEVELOPMENT : 

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DISASTERS AND DEVELOPMENT DISASTERS SET BACK DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMING DESTROYING YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES. REBUILDING AFTER DISASTER PROVIDES SIGNIFICANT OPPERTUNITIES TO INITIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES. DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES INCREASE AREA’S SUCEPTIBILITY TO DISASTERS. DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES CAN BE DESIGNED TO DECREASE THE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND THEIR NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCES.

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS : 

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS : 

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS : 

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS : 

UNPLANNED DEVELOPMENT LEADS TO VULNERABILITY OF DISASTERS

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE : 

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY DISASTER MAY BE OF ANY TYPE BUT ITS LONG TERM CONSEQUENCIES ARE SAME

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY 1.NO INVESTIGATION STUDY HAS BEEN MADE TILL NOW TO STUDY THE ORGANISATION STRUCTURE, PREPAREDNESS PLANS. POLICIES AND THEIR EFFECTIVENESS OF GOVT. OF INDIA AND NGO’S TO COPE UP WITH VARIOUS TRADITIONAL AND NON-TRADITIONAL DISASTERS.

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY 2. NO INVESTIGATION HAS BEEN MADE SO FAR TO MEASURE THE LEVEL OF AWARENESS AMONG THE COMMON MASSES IN INDIA TO ACT FOR MITIGATION OF DISASTERS ALONG WITH DISASTER MANAGEMENT AGENCIES.

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY IN INDIA , WE ARE STANDING ON THE DYNAMITE OF DISASTER WHICH CAN EXPLODE ANY TIME WITHOUT PRE-WARNING.

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY 3. NO STUDY HAS BEEN CONDUCTED TO INVESTIGATE THE VULNERABILITY OF INDIA TO NON-TRADITIONAL DISASTERS AND TERRORISTS THREATS. 4. THERE IS A DIRE NEED TO INVESTIGATE THE PITFALLS IN DEVELOPMENT WORKS THAT DISASTERS ARE ESCALATING WITH IT.

NEED OF STUDY : 

NEED OF STUDY 5. EXAMINATION OF VULNERABILITY OF INDIA TO TERRORISTS ATTACK IS A KEY SUBJECT OF THE STUDY. 6. THE MAIN CAUSE OF HEAVY LOSS OF LIFE AND PROPERTY IN INDIA IS LACK OF AWARENESS AMONG COMMON MASSES.

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY : 

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY 1. TO INVESTIGATE THE CHANGING DISASTER PROFILE OF INDIA 2. TO EXAMINE THE ‘ORGANISATION STRUCTURE AND ‘INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM’ OF GOVT OF INDIA AND NGO’S AND VARIOUS DISASTER MANAGEMENT AGENCIES FOR MITIGATION AND COPING UP THE DISASTERS IN INDIA.

OBJECTIVES CONT. : 

OBJECTIVES CONT. 3.TO EXAMINE THE LEVEL OF PREPAREDNESS OF GOVT OF INDIA, NGO’S AND VARIOUS DISASTER MANAGEMENT AGENCIES TO MITIGATE AND COPING UP WITH DISASTERS. 4. TO EXAMINE THE LEVEL OF AWARENESS ABOUT VARIOUS TRADITIONAL AND NON-TRADITIONAL DISASTERS AMONG THE COMMON MASSES IN INDIA.

SCOPE OF STUDY : 

SCOPE OF STUDY 1. THE STUDY LIMITS ITSELF TO THE DISASTER MANAGEMENT AGENCIES IN PUNJAB, DELHI, UTTRAKHAND AND HIMACHAL FOR CONVENIENCE REASONS. 2. THE STUDY IS MORE CONCERNED WITH PRACTICE THAN POLICIES

SCOPE OF STUDY : 

SCOPE OF STUDY 3. THE STUDY INCLUDES INDUCTION TRAINING BY ORGANISATIONS TO NEW RECRUITS AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES TO STUDENTS 4. THE STUDY RESTRICTS ITSELF ONLY TO WELL REPUTED AND GOVT. REGISTERED AGENCIES ENGAGED IN PLANNINGS AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY : 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 1. SOURCES OF DATA: PRIMARY DATA -STRUCTURED QUESTIONNAIRES ADMINISTERED THROUGH PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WITH THE RESPONDANTS SECONDARY DATA- DISASTER JOURNALS, BOOKS,MAGAZINES, PUBLISHED ARTICLES, SURVEY/DATA REPORTS, NEWSPAPERS AND INTERNET.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY : 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 2. SAMPLE SIZE AND SAMPLE PLAN: EQUAL NO. OF RESPONDANTS (30-35) FROM VARIOUS DISASTER MANAGEMENT AGENCIES,SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES, ADMINISTRATION AND LOCAL HOUSEHOLDS FROM THE SELECTED CITIES WILL BE SELECTED THROUGH STRATIFIED RANDOM SAMPLING. TOTAL RESPONDANTS: 400. THE SAMPLE OF STUDY IS SELECTED IN SUCH A MANNER THAT WHOLE UNIVERSE IS REPRESENTED

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY : 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3.DEFINITION OF RESPONDENT: THE RESPONDENTS FROM THE SELECTED CITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS WILL BE FROM AMONGST GOVT. ADMINISTRATORS, NGO’S, TEACHERS, STUDENTS, RESCUE WORKERS AND LOCAL HOUSE WIVES. SEPARATE QUESTIONNAIRES WILL BE ADMINISTERED TO ALL THE SEGMENTS.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY : 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4. DATA ANALYSIS: SUITABLE STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES WILL BE USED FOR DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Aysan, Yasemin; Clytan, A: Cary. A: Dalsis, Sanderjan, D (1995), Developing Building for Safety Programmes, Intermediate Technology Publications, London. 2. Animesh Roul(2003) ‘Plague outbreaks in India: Surat and Himachal Pradesh’, UNDRC Publication. 3. Bull, Raas, Disaster Economics, Disaster Management Training Programme, United Nations Department of Humanitarian Affairs, Geneva.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 4. Christopher H Schelz(1986) ‘The Mechanics of Earthquake and Faulting’, Immediate Technology Publications, London. 5. Carter, W.N., Disaster Management, A Disaster Manager’s Handbook (1992), Asia Development House, Manila. 6. Contingency Action Plan for natural calamities, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, Govt. of India.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 7. Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, 1982, United Nations Disaster Relief Coordinator, New York. 8. Green, Stephan, 1977, International Disaster Relief : Towards A Responsive System; McGraw Hill Book Company, New York. 9. Hand Book for Emergency, 1982, United Nation High Commission for Refugees, Geneva.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 10.Indu Prakash, 1994, Disaster Management, Rashtra Prahari Prakashan, Ghaziabad. 11.Keralin, N.L., Life Supporting Resuscitation and First Aid, 1984, League of Red Cross and Red Cresent Societies, Geneva. 12.Kumar, Jayant (1995), Community based Disaster Management- A Study From Coastal Andhra Pradesh, (Mimeograph).

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 13.Khera, Sharma, Bhatia and Verma, B.K., Health Implications of Disasters in India, Heath India, Sept.-Oct., 1994. 14.Kotz, Astrid and Halovey, Alesa, Reducing Risk, International Federation of Red Cross. 15.Manual on Natural Disaster Managements In India, 2001, National Centre for Disaster Management, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, Govt. of India.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 16. Mega Cities : Reducing Vulnerability to Natural Disasters (1995), The Institution of Civil Engineers, Thomas Telford, London 17.Mishra, G.K. and Mathur, G.C. (1993), Natural Disaster Reduction, Reliance Public House, New Delhi. 18.NICD Report on Earthquake Disaster, Man Maharashtra, 1993, New Delhi. 19.Ross, Simon, 1987, Hagard Geography, Longmans, U.K.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 20. Rapid Health Assessment in Bihar and Himachal Pradesh, 1993, NIICD experts meet, Simla (June 1994). 21.Reed, Sheila, B. (1992), Introduction to hazards-UNDRC Publication. 22.Sinha, Anil, Sharma, V.K., Culture of Prevention (Natural Disaster Management : India), 1999, Indian Institute of Public administration, New Delhi, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, Govt. of India.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 23. Sharma, V.K. (1995), Disaster Management, IIPA, New Delhi. 24. Sharma, S.C., Media, Communication and Development Rawat Publications, Jaipur. 25. S.R.M., Guide to Sanitation in Natural Disaster, 1971, Geneva, INHO. 26.The Govt. of India Report (1988), The draught of 1987, Response and Management.

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. 27.Turner, Barry, A. and Nick, F. Pidgeon, 1997, Man-made Disasters Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford. 28.World Disaster Report, 1993, International Federation of Cross and Crescent Societies, Geneva

bibliography cont. : 

bibliography cont. WEBSITES REFERED www.web.worldbank.org www.undp.org www.ficci.com www.indesi.net www.itbp.com www.nitsrdr.com www.nidm.com

REMEMBER : 

REMEMBER IN INDIA WE ARE SITTING ON THE DYNAMITE OF DISASTERS WHICH CAN EXPLODE ANY TIME WITHOUT ANY INFORMATION

THANKS : 

THANKS

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