Secondary glazing- Things to Know

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Presentation Description

Studies done recently have proven secondary glazing can reduce by as much as 60% the amount of heat lost by a window because of reasons such as radiation and conduction.

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Presentation Transcript

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Secondary Glazing- Things to Know

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The process of secondary glazing is not something new. It has been used for a long time now – almost from the nineteenth century. During the nineteenth century there were many buildings that had internal secondary glazing in their original layout. Often in the spaces below the windows solid panels along with counterbalanced weights or second double hung sash windows were fitted. They had mainly one function – to bring down the amount of heat lost. It also insulated the window aperture from sound to a certain extent.

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How should you do it? Your secondary glazing always needs to be installed after careful planning. When you are able to do this you are able to preserve your windows in their original condition. This way, you are also able to repair your older windows as and when it is needed to be done. Uses of Secondary Glazing Studies done recently have proven secondary glazing can reduce by as much as 60% the amount of heat lost by a window because of reasons such as radiation and conduction. However, this is only applicable when use hard coating with low emissivity or low-E on the external part of your window.

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How are they available? Secondary glazing is available in various forms such as open-able, fixed, and removable versions. The open-able panels can be sliding sashes or casements. With these units you can clean up the external window and open both the external window as well as secondary glazing in case you need some fresh air. You can detach the secondary glazing surfaces during the summer months since you will not – in all probability – need its extra heating facilities. You can also use plastic sheets as secondary glazing. These are known as storm glazing.

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