SPIRIT BLUE AGAR is used for detection and enumeration

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

Spirit Blue Agar is prepared according to the formulation of Starr. It is a basal medium to which lipoidal substrate is added for the detection, enumeration and study of lipolytic microorganisms. Formulations in practice before Starr which included dyes as indicators of lipolysis were sometimes inhibitory to the microorganisms. Starr showed spirit blue to be inert and an ideal indicator of lipolysis, visualized as clear halos around colonies. https://www.tmmedia.in/content/spirit-blue-agar

Comments

Presentation Transcript

slide 1:

PRODUCT DATA SHEET www.titanmedia.in Page 1 SPIRIT BLUE AGAR TM 1409 for detection and enumeration of lipolytic microorganism Composition Dehydrated powder store in a dry place in tightly-sealed containers at 24°C and protect from direct Sunlight. Instructions for Use Dissolve 32.15 gms in 1000 ml of distilled water. Gently heat to boiling with gentle swirling and dissolve the medium completely. Sterilize by autoclaving at 15 psi 121ºC for 15 minutes. Cool to 45 - 50°C and add 30 ml lipase substrate slowly while agitating to obtain an even distribution. Appearance: Basal medium yields blue coloured clear to slightly opalescent gel. With addition of lipase substrate lavender coloured slightly opalescent PH at 25°C: 6.8 ± 0.2 Principle SPIRIT BLUE AGAR is used for detection and enumeration of lipolytic microorganism. Spirit Blue Agar is prepared according to the formulation of Starr. It is a basal medium to which lipoidal substrate is added for the detection enumeration and study of lipolytic microorganisms. Formulations in practice before Starr which included dyes as indicators of lipolysis were sometimes inhibitory to the microorganisms. Starr showed spirit blue to be inert and an ideal indicator of lipolysis visualized as clear halos around colonies. Lipids including fats and oils are highly reduced. When a lipid is catabolized it has the potential to yield more pairs of electrons per gram and thus more energy than either carbohydrates or proteins. This process is brought about by the enzyme lipase and the organisms possessing the enzyme lipase are called lipolytic organisms. Growth of lipase-producing microorganisms can contribute to flavour defects in milk and high fat dairy products. Some of the free fatty acids released by the action of lipolytic enzymes have a low flavour threshold and can impart a rancid flavour at low concentrations. Casein enzymic hydrolysate and yeast extract in the medium are sources of carbon nitrogen vitamins and minerals. Spirit blue is a dye which acts as an indicator of lipolysis. The lipase reagents recommended as the lipid source are cotton seed meal cream olive oil etc. A satisfactory emulsion can be prepared by dissolving 10 gram acacia or 1 ml polysorbate 80 in 400 ml warm distilled water adding 100 ml cotton seed or olive oil and agitating vigorously to emulsify. Ingredients Gms/Ltr. Casein enzymic hydrolysate 10.000 Yeast extract 5.000 Spirit blue 0.150 Agar 17.000

slide 2:

PRODUCT DATA SHEET www.titanmedia.in Page 2 Prepare 1:10 or other suitable dilution of the product to be tested. Spread 0.1 ml of the desired dilutions over the surface of the medium. Incubate at 35 - 37°C for 24 - 48 hours. Colonies of lipolytic organisms develop a clear zone and /or a deep blue colour around and under each colony. Interpretation Cultural characteristics observed after incubation at 35 - 37°C for 48 – 72 hours with added lipase substrate. Microorganisms ATCC Inoculum CFU Growth Lipase activity Proteus mirabilis 25933 10 3 Luxuriant Negative absence of zone around colony Staphylococcus aureus 25923 10 3 Luxuriant Positive reaction clear zone around colony Staphylococcus epidermidis 12228 10 3 Luxuriant Positive reaction clear zone around colony References 1. Nortan C. F. 1986 Microbiology 2nd Ed. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. 2. Starr 1941 Science 93:333.3. Marshall R. T. Ed. 1993 Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products 16th Ed APHA Washington D.C.

authorStream Live Help