Module 7--Final Report

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Module Seven: Final Report Format :

Module Seven: Final Report Format

Keep in mind::

Keep in mind: Readers’ Needs easy information access Structure and organization

Elements of the Final Report:

Elements of the Final Report letter of transmittal title page table of contents list of illustrations executive summary abstract Introduction Methods Results Discussion glossary and list of symbols Appendix (Works Cited)

FORMAL ELEMENTS AND THE WORD PROCESSOR :

FORMAL ELEMENTS AND THE WORD PROCESSOR Order of component creation? Assembly Copying & Insertion—a good way to put together a group report.

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL :

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Introduces purpose and content of report to the principal reader. Attached to report or placed on top of it--not in it. Follows business letter format. Establishes tone of report Customary even for internal reports.

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL:

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Emphasis/Spin Doctoring Any errors or omissions. Information gathered after study was conducted?

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL:

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL Generally contains the following: 1. a statement of the title, and possibly the purpose of the report 2. Cites authorization of the project and when 3. Possible statement of the methods, the principal results, conclusions, recommendations.

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL:

THE LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 4. an acknowledgement of any assistance or materials 5. a gracious offer to assist in interpreting the report or in carrying out further projects.

TITLE PAGE :

TITLE PAGE A good title answers two questions: 1. What is the subject of the report? 2. What type of report is it?

TITLE PAGE:

TITLE PAGE Center the title about 1/3 way down page; Add reader's and writer's positions, the organization's name, and date; Distribution list, if the report is to be read by a number of individuals.

THE TABLE OF CONTENTS :

THE TABLE OF CONTENTS Should make structure, coverage, and pagination clear (functions as an index). Headings are the same as those in the report. Avoid generic headings (example: Not "Recommendations," but "Recommendations: Five Ways to Improve Information Retrieval“) List headings and subheadings . Use same format as in text.

THE TABLE OF CONTENTS:

THE TABLE OF CONTENTS Basic aspects of formatting: Size & Font. Indention. Outline- and decimal-style headings

THE LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS :

THE LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS A table of contents for figures and tables. If report contains only figures, it is a list of figures . If contains only tables, it is a list of tables . If contains both, it is called a list of illustrations . Listed after table of contents. Include the visual aid’s title and page number

THE ABSTRACT :

THE ABSTRACT A one-paragraph descriptive summary of the report; The length depends upon your purposes. A good general rule is 10% of the introduction, methods, results, and discussion; Describes what report is about; Lists the topics covered, giving equal coverage to each; Duplicates information in the table of contents.

THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY :

THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Informative Summary Becoming the accepted standard; Presents the major information that the report conveys; States the problem, the scope and method (if appropriate), and the major results, conclusions, or recommendations.

THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY :

THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY One-page (maximum--unwritten standard) condensation of report. Use headings (at least one); Intended for managers; Basic structure: Background Major findings and implications.

The Differences Between the abstract and Executive Summary:

The Differences Between the abstract and Executive Summary Abstract Length: 10% of body Intent—Simply Describes what’s in the report Format: One ¶ No Headings Objective Executive Summary Length: One Full Page Intent: Describes and evaluates for the main audience Format: At least two ¶ s. At least one heading. Subjective

THE GLOSSARY :

THE GLOSSARY Glossary--an alphabetized list of definitions; Can signal by putting glossary terms in bold; Usually an appendix OR May be right after table of contents if less than one page and the principle audience will need it to understand the report.

Appendices :

Appendices Any section that follows body of report; Bibliography; Information too bulky or of interest to only a few; Usually lettered (Appendix A, Appendix B); Each one listed in table of contents; Referred to in body where appropriate.

Wait a minute . . . :

Wait a minute . . . What comes between the prefatory material and the appendices? Introduction Methods Results Discussion

Introduction:

Introduction Provide the rationale for the study Clearly state your purpose for writing the study Think in terms of an hypothesis or a research question Write in the present tense

Methods:

Methods Describe the methods you have used to collect data Describe each one and offer a rationale for why you chose it Include those that were unfruitful Include criteria for why certain human subjects were chosen Append any informed consent documents required Written in the past tense.

Results:

Results Describe your implementation of your methods Present the data derived from these methods

Discussion:

Discussion What have you learned? How does what you learned contrast with what was previously believed? Critique your work.

Remember . . . . :

Remember . . . . Send me an electronic copy via Georgia View The electronic copy should be ONE FILE . I will not grade a report sent to me in multiple files. Drop a printed copy at my office if it is convenient.

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