ACTION RESEARCH

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CHARACTERISTICS, BENEFITS & METHODOLOGY of ACTION RESEARCH :

CHARACTERISTICS , BENEFITS & METHODOLOGY of ACTION RESEARCH

Action research:

Action research Action research is a systematic form of inquiry that is collective, collaborative, self-reflective, critical, and undertaken by the participants of the inquiry

CHARACTERISTICS :

CHARACTERISTICS 1.   Action research can be used by teachers to investigate a relevant classroom problem. Action research involves teacher reflection at each step in the inquiry process. Action research can be used to improve practice, solve a problem, institute change or enhance teacher development.

Slide 4:

Action research is naturalistic and often uses participant observation techniques to study a phenomenon. Action research is a collaborative process, with the individuals who are responsible for action conducting the research. Action research often involves solving practical problems and exploring classroom issues.

Slide 5:

Action research expands teachers' professional knowledge in a specific discipline. Action research is dynamic; change is an inherent part of the action research process. Action research involves teachers engaging in the cyclical process of planning, acting, and reflecting (the action research cycle).

BENEFITS OF ACTION RESEARCH :

BENEFITS OF ACTION RESEARCH FOCUS ON SCHOOL ISSUE, PROBLEM,OR AREA OF COLLECTIVE INTEREST FORM OF TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COLLEGIAL INTERACTIONS POTENTIAL TO IMPACT SCHOOL CHANGE REFLECT ON OWN PRACTICE IMPROVED COMMUNICATIONS

method of action research:

method of action research Planning Acting Observing Reflecting Re-planning

Planning :

Planning The first phase of the research action process is PLANNING. For example, it might involve detailed planning of lessons well in advance such as the whole week's lesson. Also, included is to consider the kinds of equipment and facilities required for execution of the lessons. The idea of long term planning is to give the researcher an overview of the plan of action. However, it should be noted that planning ahead also leads to changing or making adjustments along the way. For example, there might be a change in venue, interruptions from administrative matters, not being able to complete a lesson or alternatively more is covered in a lesson than originally planned

Acting:

Acting The second phase of the action research process is simply ACTING on the plan created by the researcher. Did you act on the lesson that was planned? Did you have to make changes? For example, due to interruptions you had to shorten the lesson and some of the planned teaching -learning activities could not be carried out. The students were enjoying certain parts of the lesson and you allowed more time than planned and could not cover the other aspects of the lesson

Observing:

Observing The third phase of action research is OBSERVING how you carried out the plan and how the plans were changed and modified as you went along. For example, you had to give more attention to certain students. The skills of observing improves as the researcher becomes more familiar with the students/subjects. The second observer or 'critical friend' also notes what is going on with the teaching.

Reflecting :

Reflecting The fourth phase of action research is REFLECTING. Here the researcher takes a few moments after each lesson to reflect on what worked well and what could be improved which is written in a journal. Leter these personal thoughts are expanded which may be verbalised on to an audio recorder. The researcher also discusses with his/her critical friend which was recorded both on audiotapes and paper. The sharing of the what was happening in the class emphasises the significance of having a second observer as a valuable tool. For example, something which the researcher thought was minor could be seen as important by the 'critical friend'.

Re-planning :

Re-planning The fifth phase, RE-PLANNING completes the action research cycle and sets the stage for the next one. Based on what happened in the four phases, a revised or new plan based on new concerns may be created. For example, in the initial stage one problem solving activity was planned but when implemented it was found that two problem activities would be better to enhance student enjoyment in such activities.

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