Webinar Sept 25, 2017 - Coach/Principal Partnership

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Coach/Principal Partnership Webinar:

Coach/Principal Partnership Webinar September 2017 Steve Barkley

Why does Instructional Coaching require a partnership?:

Why does Instructional Coaching require a partnership? Principal as an Instructional Leader has a responsibility for teacher growth. Instructional Coach (IC) is an investment the system is making in student achievement in the school. Principal and IC share responsibility for increased student achievement.

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

3 areas to explore today:

3 areas to explore today

Focus and Goals:

Focus and Goals Joellen Killion Coaches’ primary responsibility is student learning often mediated by teachers’ application of effective practices rather than knowing about or knowing how to use those practices.

Planning Backwards:

Planning Backwards

Implementing the plan:

Implementing the plan

Where would you want to build in progress check points?:

Where would you want to build in progress check points?

Changes Needed to Improve Student Achievement:

Changes Needed to Improve Student Achievement How do you see your role in the changing behaviors of students, teachers, teacher leaders, and administrator? L E A D E R S H I P S T A F F R E L A T I O N S H I P S T E A C H E R S / P A R E N T S C H A N G E S I N S T U D E N T S S T U D E N T A C H I E V E M E N T YOU What are the behaviors/practices of school leadership that are necessary to initiate, motivate, and support these changes? Are there changes that need to occur in the way that staff members work with each other in order for the desired individual staff members changes to occur? What changes must occur in individual staff/teacher practices to generate the changes you seek in students? What changes must occur in parent practices to generate the changes you seek in students? What are the changes in student behavior, performance, choices, effort, etc., that you believe are precursors to the improvement in student learning that you seek?

Expectations:

Expectations Instructional Coach Administrator Teachers

Instructional Coach Expectations:

Instructional Coach Expectations Provide the supporting elements necessary for teachers to add new learning to their practice that will impact student achievement. Maintain a non-evaluative relationship with teachers as you join them in accepting shared responsibility for student success.

KEY ELEMENTS:

KEY ELEMENTS Knowledge Model Practice Observation with Feedback Ongoing Coaching

Knowledge:

Knowledge Why Research Formal/Informal How to Complex to Simple

Model:

Model Environment Skills

Practice:

Practice Safe Environment Feedback Twenty to thirty repetitions over an eight- to ten-week period.

Two Opportunities for Observation with Feedback:

Two Opportunities for Observation with Feedback Practice Environment: ex. Workshops Classroom Situations: ex. Coaching

Joyce/Showers Research:

Joyce/Showers Research Training Components and Attainment of Outcomes in Terms of Percent of Participants Components Study of Theory Demonstrations Practice Peer Coaching Beverly Joyce and Bruce Showers (2002) Student Achievement Through Staff Development 3 rd Edition. Ch. 5: Designing Training and Peer Coaching: Our Needs for Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Knowledge (thorough) 10 30 60 95 Skill (strong) 5 20 60 95 Transfer (executive implementation) 0 0 5 95 — OUTCOMES —

Slide18:

Unconsciously Talented Unconsciously Unskilled Consciously Unskilled Consciously Skilled Unconsciously Skilled Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder Gordon’s Skill Development Ladder The Art of Teaching

Slide19:

Later Now The coach is a cheerleader during this difficult time. Learning Dip

Slide20:

Novice Empowered Learner Developing What teacher behaviors support movement What teacher behaviors support movement Student Production Behaviors The Complexity of Creating Student Learning Outcomes Evidence of Progress Evidence of Progress

Understanding the Connection…:

Understanding the Connection… In order to see the link between teacher behavior and student achievement let’s use an example of: Higher Order Questioning Strategies

Examine the relationship between students and teacher in questioning:

Examine the relationship between students and teacher in questioning

Higher Order Questioning: Skill Analysis:

Higher Order Questioning: Skill Analysis Teacher Behavior 1: (T1) Write questions into plans and start asking questions in class discussion Student Response 1: (S1) Confusion, Reluctant to respond

Slide24:

T1: Write questions, start asking; T2: Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking; S1: Confusion, reluctant to respond; S2: Attempt to answer posed questions;

Slide25:

T1: Write questions, start asking; T2: Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking; T3: Provides encouragement, probing, pausing; S1: Confusion, reluctant to respond; S2: Attempt to answer posed questions; S3: Successfully responds;

Slide26:

T1: Write questions, start asking; T2: Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking; T3: Provides encouragement, probing, pausing; T4: Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue; S1: Confusion, reluctant to respond; S2: Attempt to answer posed questions; S3: Successfully responds; S4: Students debate;

Slide27:

T1: Write questions, start asking; T2: Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking; T3: Provides encouragement, probing, pausing; T4: Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue; T5: Provide supportive and conflicting data; S1: Confusion, reluctant to respond; S2: Attempt to answer posed questions; S3: Successfully responds; S4: Students debate; S5: Students pose higher level questions;

Slide28:

Teacher Behavior Changes Student Responses Higher Order Questioning Student Achievement

Administrator Expectations:

Administrator Expectations Communicate the expectation for teachers to engage in working with the IC Maintain the non-evaluative role of the instructional coach Assist in creating the time coaching

Instructional Coaching:

Instructional Coaching EVALUATION Outside Criteria MENTORING PEER COACHING Teacher’s Choice SUPERVISION

Trusting the Roles:

Trusting the Roles No communication between coach and admin. Admin talks to coach. No coach to admin. Coach shares good news. Full…open sharing. Teacher Coach Administrator

Teacher Expectations:

Teacher Expectations Engage openly with the coach with a goal of maximizing student success.

Creating a Coaching Culture:

Creating a Coaching Culture In a coaching culture, most staff use a coaching approach in their daily life – with each another, and with external stakeholders and customers. A true coaching culture is just ‘part of the way we do things around here’. But it’s not all motherhood and apple pie. A coaching culture is about delivering results, improving performance and making the most of people’s potential. The emphasis is on delivering results and making each other (and the wider organisation ) stronger and more capable. It’s NOT about having coaching conversations for their own sake, or as a diversion from other activities! Ed Parsloe

The Coach of Coaching:

The Coach of Coaching The instructional coach can assist teachers in forming coaching connections for peer coaching: common professional growth goals within PLCs shared student concerns

Change Agents:

Change Agents What leadership behaviors of principal and instructional coach will work to create the desired vision of a coaching culture that impacts student success?

Partnership Checkpoints :

Partnership Checkpoints Schedule at least bi-weekly check-in conversations. Principal and IC should be coaching each other. As partners, make commitments to each other to carry out the agreed upon leadership actions. Be accountable to each other. Request feedback whenever your actions are incongruent with the plan.

authorStream Live Help