Region 13 June 28, 2017

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Coaching Focused on Student Learning Behaviors:

Coaching Focused on Student Learning Behaviors Steve Barkley June 2017

Coaching Focused on Student Learning Behaviors :

Coaching Focused on Student Learning Behaviors It’s ”what students do” that creates student learning and student achievement. Teachers need to plan for the initiation, development, and motivation of the critical student learning behaviors. Coaches need to build and support teachers’ instructional practices that generate student production learning behaviors. Coaches work with leadership teams, professional development, PLCs, and one-on-one coaching to guide teachers’ continual effectiveness.

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Student Achievement:

Student Achievement What is the definition of student achievement?

Learning and Innovation Skills:

Learning and Innovation Skills Learning and innovation skills increasingly are being recognized as those that separate students who are prepared for more and more complex life and work environments in the 21 st century, and those who are not. A focus on creativity and critical thinking, communication and collaboration is essential to prepare students for the future.

Slide6:

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GOALS ACADEMICS - knowledge and skills to be successful in school and life. LIFE SKILLS - aptitude, attitude and skills to lead responsible, fulfilling and respectful lives. RESPONSIBILITY TO THE COMMUNITY - attributes that contribute to an effective and productive community and the common good of all.

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Student Behaviors:

Student Behaviors What student behaviors need to be initiated or increased to gain the desired student achievement?

Student Achievement:

Student Achievement When you identify your student achievement goals for improvement, what are some of the student behaviors you identify as being necessary for generating the desired learning? Outcome Behavior Indicators Production Behaviors

Student Behaviors:

Student Behaviors Outcome: Increased Vocabulary Production: Hear new vocabulary in teacher reading and speaking Conversation with others using new vocabulary Reading material with new vocabulary Writing for purpose that requires new vocabulary

Student Behaviors:

Student Behaviors Outcome: Number Sense through 100 . Production: Counting objects and people with purpose Bundling and counting by 10s and 5s Conversation with others explaining multiple ways to demonstrate numeral representation Drawing pictures to illustrate 10s and ones Writing math problems that illustrate combining numbers

Student Behaviors :

Student Behaviors Active – Students are actively engaged in educational activities where technology is a transparent tool used to generate and accomplish objectives and learning. Collaborative – Students use technology tools to collaborate with others. Constructive – Students use technology to under-stand content and add meaning to their learning.

Student Behaviors:

Student Behaviors Authentic – Students use technology tools to solve real-world problems meaningful to them, such as digital citizenship. Goal-Directed – Students use technology tools to research data, set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results.

How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why?:

How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why? Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented

What would you want to increase in your students’ learning?:

What would you want to increase in your students’ learning? Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Teacher Behaviors:

Teacher Behaviors What teacher behaviors are most likely to generate these student behaviors?

Teacher Behaviors:

Teacher Behaviors Teach the desired student behavior. Model the desired student behavior.

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Teacher Behaviors:

Teacher Behaviors How do teacher behaviors need to change for your vision to be achieved?

Teacher Relationships:

Teacher Relationships What changes need to occur in how teachers work with each other to support the needed teacher behaviors?

Slide22:

Teacher Relationships Parallel Play Adversarial Relationships Congenial Relationships Collegial Relationships Roland S. Barth Relationships Within the Schoolhouse ASCD 2006

Slide23:

My Work My Time Design together Implement individually Shared responsibility for student achievement Helping each other Modify Individual Behavior Consensus on implementation Individual Franchise Team

School Change:

School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Ways for Teachers to Collaborate:

Ways for Teachers to Collaborate

Big Idea A Focus on Results:

Big Idea A Focus on Results Professional Learning Communities judge their effectiveness on a basis of results. Working together to improve student achievement becomes the routine work of everyone in the school. Every teacher-team participates in an ongoing process of identifying the current level of student achievement, establishing a goal to improve the current level, working together to achieve that goal, and providing periodic evidence of progress. ( DuFour )

Focusing the PLC:

Focusing the PLC Based on your school goals and improvement plan, each PLC should have an agreed upon goal(s) that represents their responsibility to the achievement of the school goal. School Goal: Raise the percentage of students passing the state grade-level math test from 65% to 75%. For grade 5, the PLC goal is to have all students who passed 4 th to pass 5 th and for 8 students who didn’t pass 4 th to pass 5 th .

What data are we using?:

What data are we using? For grade 5, the PLC goal is to have all students who passed 4 th to pass 5 th and for 8 students who didn’t pass 4 th to pass 5 th . Each end-of-unit assessment the PLC is checking that all those students who passed the pretest assessment are on target to pass. 8 students selected to make more than a year’s worth of growth may be on the agenda every other week with examples of current classroom assignments or formative assessments.

From Talk to Action:

From Talk to Action Each end-of-unit math assessment the PLC is checking that all those students who passed the 4 th grade assessment are on target to pass. 7 students did not pass the most recent assessment on fractions. PLC analyzes the test papers of those 7 for similarities and differences. 2 students made careless computational mistakes. 5 show misconceptions of numerator/denominator relationship.

From Talk to Action:

From Talk to Action 2 students made careless computational mistakes. Decision is reached that teachers will reassess these two students to confirm thinking that understanding is present. 5 show misconceptions of numerator/denominator relationship. Decision is made to schedule an activity where two teachers will work with students from the three classrooms while their colleague does a 40-minute small group hands-on application with the five students. Each teacher will follow up with a morning review worksheet for the five on the next five days. Students will then be reassessed. One teacher thinks it would be good for three ELL students to join this group to practice academic vocabulary. Team agrees.

Big Idea Ensuring That Students Learn :

Big Idea Ensuring That Students Learn The professional learning community model flows from the assumption that the core mission of formal education is not simply to ensure that students are taught but to ensure that they learn. This simple shift – from a focus on teaching to a focus on learning – has profound implications for schools. ( DuFour )

Slide32:

Teaching (Can be) • Neat • Orderly • Sequential • Managed • Documented Learning (Often is) • Messy • Spontaneous • Irregular • Non Linear • Complex

Slide33:

Teachers Must Study Learning and Student Work Observe Think Experiment Create Standard Standard

Slide34:

Teachers Must Study Learning and Student Work Observe Think Experiment Create Standards Standards PLC

Focusing the PLC (Another approach):

Focusing the PLC (Another approach) Based on your school goals and improvement plan, each PLC should have an agreed upon goal(s) that represents their responsibility to the achievement of the school goal. School Goal: Raise the percentage of students passing the state grade-level math test from 65 % to 75%. The PLC selects 7 of the math standards as power standards, i.e. most important to students’ future success and enduring beyond “ school math.” They set a goal to have 90% of students master each power standard. They believe mastery of these power standards will increase student performance on state test.

Focusing the PLC (Another approach):

Focusing the PLC (Another approach) They set a goal to have 90% of students master each power standard. They believe mastery of these power standards will increase student performance on state test. The team decides to co-plan instruction on each of these 7 standards across the year. They develop common formative assessments and review results frequently and modify plans, sometimes regrouping students across their classroom. Working with administration they may modify pacing schedules if a substantial number of students struggle with a power standard. They invite the instructional coach to observe them frequently and report differences she notices in how they instruct a common activity.

Big Idea A Culture of Collaboration:

Big Idea A Culture of Collaboration Educators who are building a professional learning community recognize that they must work together to achieve their collective purpose of learning for all. Therefore, they create structures to promote a collaborative culture. ( DuFour )

Slide38:

My Work My Time Design together Implement individually Shared responsibility for student achievement Helping each other Modify Individual Behavior Consensus on implementation Individual Franchise Team Vulnerability Trust Vulnerability ACTION Trust

PLC Leaders:

PLC Leaders

PLC Leaders:

PLC Leaders

Leader Behaviors:

Leader Behaviors What leadership behaviors are needed to support the desired staff, teacher, parent, and student behaviors?

Planning Backwards:

Planning Backwards How does your vision of desired student achievement reflect backwards to define your purposeful actions?

Instructional Coaching:

Instructional Coaching EVALUATION Outside Criteria MENTORING PEER COACHING Teacher’s Choice SUPERVISION

Slide44:

Pre-observation Conference Observation Post-observation Conference

Slide45:

The Environmental Influences

The Environmental Influences:

The Environmental Influences Right/Wrong One Way Sequence Skills Test Control Authority Quick Fix Uncover Thinking Opinions Problem Solving Creativity Critical Thinking Discussion Emotions/Feeling Counseling

Confirmatory Paraphrase:

Confirmatory Paraphrase Fact Attitude/Feeling Intention Commitment

Slide49:

Coach: That was a difficult lesson Coachee : It’s frustrating to put so much time into planning a lesson and then not have it go well.

PRACTICE:

PRACTICE Teacher : My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it.

Slide51:

Teacher: My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Fact You have not been able to get many of the students to work outside of class.

Slide52:

Teacher: My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Feeling You are worried that presenting information in class won’t get the student achievement that you want.

Slide53:

Teacher: My students won’t read an assign- ment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Attitude If students read outside of class you would teach very differently. You want to find a way to get them to read outside of class.

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals Too many students don’t care about their grades…there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat.

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals Too many students don’t care about their grades… there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat. You have a strong desire for your students to do well. Grades just don’t seem to be it. You see a need to find a different way to motivate your students.

Coaching Options:

Coaching Options Technical Coaching Challenge Coaching Collegial Coaching Cognitive Coaching

Why Promote Teacher Ownership of Professional Growth?:

Why Promote Teacher Ownership of Professional Growth? Trust Vulnerability What Do Students Need Teachers to Learn

authorStream Live Help