NESA Bangkok April 3, 2016

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Coaching Conferencing Skills:

Coaching Conferencing Skills Steve Barkley April 2016

Coaching Conferencing Skills:

Coaching Conferencing Skills Effective coaching is built upon communication and conferencing skills that engage the teacher in dialogue and self-reflective practice. In this workshop, you will observe, study, practice and reflect upon the critical coaching/conferencing verbal skills. Questioning and paraphrasing skills, as well as feedback strategies, are included. Opportunities to practice the skills and be coached by participants will be embedded throughout. Bring scenarios from your coaching experience to the session for Mr. Barkley’s suggestions and modeling.

Coaching Roles:

Coaching Roles EVALUATION Outside Criteria MENTORING PEER COACHING Teacher’s Choice SUPERVISION

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Pre-observation Conference Observation Post-observation Conference

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The Environmental Influences

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LISTENING TEST You believe that . . . . . . . . . . . My focus is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I should notice . . . . . . . . . . . .

Confirmatory Paraphrase:

Confirmatory Paraphrase Fact Attitude/Feeling Intention Commitment

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Coach: That was a difficult lesson Coachee : It’s frustrating to put so much time into planning a lesson and then not have it go well.

PRACTICE:

PRACTICE Teacher : My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it.

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Teacher: My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Fact You have not been able to get many of the students to work outside of class.

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Teacher: My students won’t read an assignment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Feeling You are worried that presenting information in class won’t get the student achievement that you want.

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Teacher: My students won’t read an assign- ment so I don’t see how I can do anything other than present information in class hoping they will remember some of it. Attitude If students read outside of class you would teach very differently. You want to find a way to get them to read outside of class.

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals Too many students don’t care about their grades…there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat.

Gripes to Goals:

Gripes to Goals Too many students don’t care about their grades… there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat. You have a strong desire for your students to do well. Grades just don’t seem to be it. You see a need to find a different way to motivate your students.

The Feedback Process: Transforming Feedback for Professional Learning:

The Feedback Process: Transforming Feedback for Professional Learning Feedback is a process that engages the learner in review, analysis, reflection, and planning of future action. When learners actively engage in constructing feedback rather than passively receiving feedback, they are far more likely to own the information generated and to take responsibility for future actions. (pg22) Joellen Killion

What feedback do teachers need? Who provides it?:

What feedback do teachers need? Who provides it?

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Approval H.I.P. Personalize Cite the Specifics

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Making Suggestions Phrase Positively Clear and Specific Congruent Pay-off

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Payoff Cost

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Observation Form

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Barth: By collegiality I mean four things One, teachers talking with one another about the work they do -- talking in faculty meetings, in hallways, in classrooms, at the dinner table about practice. Second, sharing that craft knowledge, shouting it from the mountaintop, and honoring it when someone else is sharing it.

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Third, making our practice mutually visible. That is, you come into my classroom and watch me teach seventh-grade biology and I come into your classroom and watch you teach ninth-grade geometry, and, afterward, we talk about what we are doing and why, and what we can learn from each other. Above all, collegiality means rooting for the success of one another. If every adult in the school is rooting for you, when the alarm clock rings at six a.m., you jump out of bed to go to that school.

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www.BarkleyPD.com

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