Wood County, WV Mar 12, 2015

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Raising Student Expectation, Engagement, Effort, and Achievement:

Raising Student Expectation, Engagement, Effort, and Achievement Wood County March 2015

Goals for the Session:

Goals for the Session Reflect upon and analyze your current levels of student expectation, engagement and effort. Identify questions to examine with staff and perhaps students to identify strategies for continuous improvement in learning.

Quality Learning:

Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning.

Quality Learning:

Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning. How would you describe this student’s behaviors during the learning?

Quality Learning:

Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning. How would you describe this student’s behaviors during the learning? What do you think this student brought to this learning opportunity?

Quality Learning:

Quality Learning Identify a time you saw large numbers of students in a class engaged in deep quality learning.

Quality Learning:

Quality Learning Identify a time you saw large numbers of students in a class engaged in deep quality learning. What is similar and different from the example of an individual student’s deep engagement?

Which of these were present in the examples you explored?:

Which of these were present in the examples you explored?

George Couros:

George Couros

Student Behaviors :

Student Behaviors Active – Students are actively engaged in educational activities where technology is a transparent tool used to generate and accomplish objectives and learning. Collaborative – Students use technology tools to collaborate with others . Constructive – Students use technology to understand content and add meaning to their learning.

Student Behaviors:

Student Behaviors Authentic – Students use technology tools to solve real-world problems meaningful to them, such as digital citizenship . Goal-Directed – Students use technology tools to research data, set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results .

How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why?:

How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why? Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented

How easy would it be to find students in your classrooms…:

How easy would it be to find students in your classrooms… Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented

Slide14:

Effort x Ability Manageable Task = Success

Tapping the brain’s… :

Tapping the brain’s… a bility to detect patterns and make approximations c apacity for various types of memory a bility to self-correct and learn from experiences by way of analysis of external data and reflection i nexhaustible capacity to create Caine and Caine, Making Connections: Teaching and the Brain , ASCD, 1991.

With a partner or two work on this problem.:

With a partner or two work on this problem. Seventy-two balls are to be placed into three containers so that there are three times as many in containers 1 and 2 combined as there are in container 3. Container 3 is to contain twice as many balls as container 2. How many balls will be in container 1?

Here is another:

Here is another What is the value of R if: Q + M = C ; C + K = R; R + Q = S ; M + K + S = 20 ; Q = 4

What elements in teaching generate these elements in learning?:

What elements in teaching generate these elements in learning?

How do you use these elements to increase student effort?:

How do you use these elements to increase student effort?

George Couros :

George Couros So if we want to get to this idea of ‘empowering’ our students, we are not going to have to be the ‘sage on the stage’ or the ‘guide at the side’, but ‘ architects of meaningful learning opportunities ’. Understanding our students, their interests, abilities, and strengths, will help us better design learning that gets them to, as Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describes, a state of “flow“.

How does this impact student and teacher learning? What is required of us as leaders? http://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning/ :

How does this impact student and teacher learning? What is required of us as leaders? http ://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning /

Slide22:

Effort x Ability Manageable Task = Success

Providing Pictures of Success:

Providing Pictures of Success Future Plans Updraft/Downdraft Goal Setting

Aspirations:

Aspirations …the ability to set goals for the future while maintaining the inspiration in the present to reach those goals.

Slide25:

Imagination Sets goals for the future but does not put forth the effort to reach those goals. Aspirations Sets goals for the future and puts forth the effort in the present to reach those goals. Hibernation Has no goals for the future and puts forth no effort in the present. Perspiration Works hard in the present but has no goals for the future. Aspirations Profile http://www.qisa.org/framework/aspirations.jsp High Low Present/Doing High Future/Dreaming

Teacher Relationships With Students:

Teacher Relationships With Students What impact do you think a teacher’s relationship with students have upon student achievement? The classics tell us t hat, in relationships, t he one between teacher and student comes second only to the one between parent and child. Lisa See

Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield :

Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield

Relationships and Aspirations :

Relationships and Aspirations http :// www.ted.com/talks/rita_pierson_every_kid_needs_a_champion?language=en#t-291680

How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone:

How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone As part of my research for the Teaching for Understanding Project, I have asked students of all ages and levels of academic success to describe those occasions in educational settings when they were most engaged intellectually. Among the common elements they listed are: Students helped define the content. Students had time to wonder and to find a particular direction that interested them. Topics had a “strange” quality—something common seen in a new way, evoking a “lingering question.”

Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions::

Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions: Is it better to kiss your girlfriend on the lips or lick her armpit? ( pathogenicity ) Why don't you have to plow your way through road kill to get to school? (decomposition) Where does your breakfast come from? (nitrogen cycle/ primary producers) What do a bottle of wine, cheese and a compost heap have in common? (fermentation) Bacteria live WHERE?! (digestion & symbiosis) What do diabetics and bacteria have in common? (genetic engineering) http://www.accessexcellence.org/LC/TL/buchanan/

Slide31:

Teachers permitted—even encouraged—different forms of expression and respected students' views. Teachers were passionate about their work. The richest activities were those “invented” by the teachers. Students created original and public products; they gained some form of “expertness.” Students did something—participated in a political action, wrote a letter to the editor, worked with the homeless. Students sensed that the results of their work were not predetermined or fully predictable How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone

Slide32:

Live Event Learning Textbook Simulation Real Life Manipulation Live-event

Anatomy of a Life Event:

Anatomy of a Life Event Multisensory Process Skills Relevance Real Consequences Emotion Real Environment

Slide34:

Live Event Activity Activity Activity Content intended -incidental Process Skills -briefed -debriefed Assessment

Engaging Students in Learning (proficient):

Engaging Students in Learning (proficient) The learning tasks and activities are aligned with the instructional outcomes and are designed to challenge student thinking, resulting in active intellectual engagement by most students with important and challenging content, and with teacher scaffolding to support that engagement. The pacing of the lesson is appropriate, providing most students the time needed to be intellectually engaged.

Engaging Students in Learning (distinguished):

Engaging Students in Learning (distinguished) Virtually all students are intellectually engaged in challenging content, through well designed learning tasks, and suitable scaffolding by the teacher, and fully aligned with the instructional outcomes. In addition, there is evidence of some student initiation of inquiry , and student contributions to the exploration of important content. The pacing of the lesson provides students the time needed to intellectually engage with and reflect upon their learning , and to consolidate their understanding. Students may have some choice in how they complete tasks and may serve as resources for one another.

Goals for the Session:

Goals for the Session What do you think? Reflect upon and analyze your current levels of student expectation, engagement and effort.

Goals for the Session:

Goals for the Session What questions are you taking with you? How do you want to explore them further? Identify questions to examine with staff and perhaps students to identify strategies for continuous improvement in learning.

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