Learning Forward Dec 2013 Pre-conference

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High Level Practices for Competent Beginning Teachers:

High Level Practices for Competent Beginning Teachers Steve Barkley

What Culture Should Beginning Teachers Find at Your Schools?:

What Culture Should Beginning Teachers Find at Your Schools?

Professional Learning Community:

Professional Learning Community Teaching is a Team Sport Teaching is a Public Act

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My Work My Time Design together Implement individually Shared responsibility for student achievement Helping each other Modify Individual Behavior, Consensus on implementation Individual Franchise Team Vulnerability Trust Vulnerability ACTION Trust

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How do we plan for and with the beginning teacher? Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley 6 Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement

Instructional Coaching:

Instructional Coaching EVALUATION Outside Criteria MENTORING PEER COACHING Teacher’s Choice SUPERVISION

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8 Unconsciously Talented Unconsciously Unskilled Consciously Unskilled Consciously Skilled Unconsciously Skilled Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder Gordon’s Skill Development Ladder The Art of Teaching

Teacher Expectations:

Teacher Expectations 674 studies confirmed that teacher expectations do have a powerful effect on student achievement. John Hattie (2009)

TEACHER MINDSET:

TEACHER MINDSET Great teachers have a growth mindset…. They view achievement not as innate, but rather as changeable--- the result of hard work. G reat teachers believe in growth of intellect and talent and are fascinated with the process of learning. ( Dweck 2006)

Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield (1972):

Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield (1972 )

Where do you stand…:

Where do you stand … Quality of Effective Teachers : Setting high expectations while nurturing student growth. (one of the strongest correlates of teacher effectiveness is student-teacher relationships)

Where do you stand…:

Where do you stand … Quality of Effective Teachers: Setting high expectations while nurturing student growth. (one of the strongest correlates of teacher effectiveness is student-teacher relationships) What do high expectations with nurturing relationships look and sound like at your grade level?

Role-play Preconference:

Role-play Preconference A - Coach/mentor B - Beginning Teacher – very beginning of the year C - Observer Coach/mentor – engage the teacher in a conversation about the classroom climate/ environment he/she wishes to establish. Create an observation opportunity.

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Observing Students Fear Attention Comfort Bored What do you see in students that you place at each spot on this continuum?

The Formula…:

Effort x Ability Manageable Task 17 = Success The Formula… 1 2 4 3 1 5 8 6 9 7 5 + = -

What is your view of ABILITY?:

What is your view of ABILITY? Fixed or Growth The growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts. Although people may differ in every which way — in their initial talents and aptitudes, interests or temperaments — everyone can change and grow through application and experience. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPNeu07I52w Mindset…The New Psychology of Success Carol Dweck , 2006 18

A Time That You Have Been Successful:

A Time That You Have Been Successful Ability Effort Degree of difficulty Luck

Providing Pictures of Success:

Providing Pictures of Success Future Plans Updraft/Downdraft Goal Setting

Teaching Effort:

Teaching Effort Time Persistence---Practice Patience Repetition of Success

Getting Started:

Getting Started Payoff Cost

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Differentiation to Create Motivation Students differ in their reasons to work hard….. put in effort Survival Belonging Power Freedom Fun

Differentiation to Create Manageable Tasks :

Differentiation to Create Manageable Tasks Students need to trust teacher …… effort will pay off Totally Safe Safety Net Push Off Cliff

How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone:

How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone As part of my research for the Teaching for Understanding Project, I have asked students of all ages and levels of academic success to describe those occasions in educational settings when they were most engaged intellectually. Among the common elements they listed are: Students helped define the content. Students had time to wonder and to find a particular direction that interested them. Topics had a “strange” quality—something common seen in a new way, evoking a “lingering question.”

Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions::

Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions: Is it better to kiss your girlfriend on the lips or lick her armpit? (pathogenicity) Why don't you have to plow your way through road kill to get to school? (decomposition) Where does your breakfast come from? (nitrogen cycle/ primary producers) What do a bottle of wine, cheese and a compost heap have in common? (fermentation) Bacteria live WHERE?! (digestion & symbiosis) What do diabetics and bacteria have in common? (genetic engineering) http://www.accessexcellence.org/LC/TL/buchanan/

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Teachers permitted—even encouraged—different forms of expression and respected students' views. Teachers were passionate about their work. The richest activities were those “invented” by the teachers. Students created original and public products; they gained some form of “expertness.” Students did something—participated in a political action, wrote a letter to the editor, worked with the homeless. Students sensed that the results of their work were not predetermined or fully predictable How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone

Ben Johnson:

Ben Johnson I'd like to suggest that you offer something like the following selection for your students to choose from: Create a slide show presentation to illustrate the major points of the chapter as if they were teachers teaching younger students. Develop a newspaper article or a journalistic TV report about the chapter as if it were breaking news. Prepare a debate on the chapter's main points and pose as either politicians or lawyers presenting their persuasive arguments. Write a drama about the contents of the chapter and perform it to their peers and parents. http://www.edutopia.org/lesson-engagement-student-choice

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Construct an encyclopedic database of vocabulary, terms, and concepts included in the chapter, as well as prior knowledge that needs to be understood, and questions that are yet to be answered. Design a virtual field trip to study topics and concepts to be learned based on the content of the chapter. Invite experts to visit their classroom and ask them questions about their expertise based on the content of the chapter. Use the contents of the chapter to devise an experiment to prove or disprove the assertions made in the chapter. Fill the walls of the classroom with essential questions gleaned from the chapter and challenge the teacher and other classes to a content quiz show. Ben Johnson http:// www.edutopia.org/lesson-engagement-student-choice

Motivators from Daniel Pink:

Motivators from Daniel Pink Autonomy – The urge to direct our own lives Mastery – The desire to get better and better at something that matters Purpose – The yearning to do something that we do in the service of something larger than ourselves.

Live Event Learning:

Live Event Learning

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Real Environment A true live event takes place in real life. It is rich with meaning, a lot of action and interaction, color, and excitement.

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Live Event Activity Activity Activity Content intended incidental Process Skills briefed debriefed Assessment

Select a desired student outcome for achievement ____________________:

Select a desired student outcome for achievement ____________________ What student behaviors are critical for students to reach this outcome? What teacher behaviors are most likely to create these desired student behaviors?

Role-play:

Role-play A – Observer B – Coach/Mentor C – Beginning Teacher Hold a conference around planning backwards from a student outcome to needed student behaviors to possible teacher actions. Arrange an observation for feedback.

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Teaching (Can be) • Neat • Orderly • Sequential • Managed • Documented

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Learning (Often is) • Messy • Spontaneous • Irregular • Non Linear • Complex

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Teaching (Can be) • Neat • Orderly • Sequential • Managed • Documented Learning (Often is) • Messy • Spontaneous • Irregular • Non Linear • Complex

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Teachers Must Study Learning and Student Work Observe Think Experiment Create Standards Standards

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Teachers Must Study Learning and Student Work Observe Think Experiment Create Standards Standards

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INSIGHT Insights Parallel Inference Pattern Realization Infer Overlapping Connection Relationship IDEA Ideas Goals Options Changes Ways Possibilities Opportunities ANALYSIS List Sequence Outline Categorize Classify Analyze Reasons Factors Parts Procedures Sort Mind map Define Steps SAME/DIFFERENT Compare Contrast Differentiate Same Different Alike Similar APPRAISAL Weigh Grade Rate Prioritize Appraise Rank (by value) best-to-worst most-to-least SUMMARY Main idea Condense Main point Reduce Summary Sum up Focus In a nutshell Summarize EVALUATION Belief Judge Viewpoint Decide Opinion Evaluate Believe Critique PREDICTION Predict Forecast Hypothesize Consequences Affect Effect Happen ACTION Apply Build Do Use Write Graph Plan Make Design Combine Draft Compose Construct Draw Role play Interview Report Produce Simulate Compute Create Questions for Life Cue Words PERCEPTION Observe Hear Notice Touch Detect Feel Picture Taste See Smell INDUCTION Qualities Rule Pattern Generalization On the whole Common elements Common characteristics

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ANALYSIS List Sequence Outline Categorize Classify Analyze Reasons Factors Parts Procedures Sort Mind map Define Steps SAME/DIFFERENT Compare Contrast Differentiate Same Different Alike Similar Questions for Life PERCEPTION Observe Hear Notice Touch Detect Feel Picture Taste See Smell INDUCTION Qualities Rule Pattern Generalization On the whole Common elements Common characteristics Row 1: Gathering Information

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life G Perceptions Generalizations Induction

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life G Perceptions Generalizations Perception Perceptions Perceptions Analysis

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life Perception Perception Same/Different

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INSIGHT Insights Parallel Inference Pattern Realization Infer Overlapping Connection Relationship APPRAISAL Weigh Grade Rate Prioritize Appraise Rank (by value) best-to-worst most-to-least SUMMARY Main idea Condense Main point Reduce Summary Sum up Focus In a nutshell Summarize EVALUATION Belief Judge Viewpoint Decide Opinion Evaluate Believe Critique Questions for Life Row 2: Working with Information

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life G G Generalization Generalizations Induction Insight G G

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life Appraisal / Evaluation (Same/Different) 48

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life 3 2 1 Summary Process 1. Gather Perceptions G G 2. Analysis ( Mindmap ) 3. Appraisal 1,2,3, etc. (Rank) 4. Summary

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life Evaluation Do you believe a difference is possible? (Why/Why not?)

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IDEA Ideas Goals Options Changes Ways Possibilities Opportunities PREDICTION Predict Forecast Hypothesize Consequences Affect Effect Happen ACTION Apply Build Do Use Write Graph Plan Make Design Combine Draft Compose Construct Draw Role play Interview Report Produce Simulate Compute Create Questions for Life Row 3: Taking Action

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life The Creative Process Collection Incubation Illumination Verification

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life Prediction + -

Row 3:

Row 3 In what ways can we incorporate individual student goal setting into our improvement plan? (ideas) What risk does our plan ask teachers to take? Students? Parents? Administration? (prediction) What is our next step? Who? When? (action)

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INSIGHT Insights Parallel Inference Pattern Realization Infer Overlapping Connection Relationship IDEA Ideas Goals Options Changes Ways Possibilities Opportunities ANALYSIS List Sequence Outline Categorize Classify Analyze Reasons Factors Parts Procedures Sort Mind map Define Steps SAME/DIFFERENT Compare Contrast Differentiate Same Different Alike Similar APPRAISAL Weigh Grade Rate Prioritize Appraise Rank (by value) best-to-worst most-to-least SUMMARY Main idea Condense Main point Reduce Summary Sum up Focus In a nutshell Summarize EVALUATION Belief Judge Viewpoint Decide Opinion Evaluate Believe Critique PREDICTION Predict Forecast Hypothesize Consequences Affect Effect Happen ACTION Apply Build Do Use Write Graph Plan Make Design Combine Draft Compose Construct Draw Role play Interview Report Produce Simulate Compute Create Questions for Life Cue Words PERCEPTION Observe Hear Notice Touch Detect Feel Picture Taste See Smell INDUCTION Qualities Rule Pattern Generalization On the whole Common elements Common characteristics

Row 1:

Row 1 What are some of the first responses to individual goal setting that we are likely to hear from students? Parents? (perception) On the whole, what would indicate progress? (induction)

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Teachers Must Study Learning and Student Work Observe Think Experiment Create Standards Standards

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INSIGHT Insights Parallel Inference Pattern Realization Infer Overlapping Connection Relationship IDEA Ideas Goals Options Changes Ways Possibilities Opportunities ANALYSIS List Sequence Outline Categorize Classify Analyze Reasons Factors Parts Procedures Sort Mind map Define Steps SAME/DIFFERENT Compare Contrast Differentiate Same Different Alike Similar APPRAISAL Weigh Grade Rate Prioritize Appraise Rank (by value) best-to-worst most-to-least SUMMARY Main idea Condense Main point Reduce Summary Sum up Focus In a nutshell Summarize EVALUATION Belief Judge Viewpoint Decide Opinion Evaluate Believe Critique PREDICTION Predict Forecast Hypothesize Consequences Affect Effect Happen ACTION Apply Build Do Use Write Graph Plan Make Design Combine Draft Compose Construct Draw Role play Interview Report Produce Simulate Compute Create Questions for Life Cue Words PERCEPTION Observe Hear Notice Touch Detect Feel Picture Taste See Smell INDUCTION Qualities Rule Pattern Generalization On the whole Common elements Common characteristics

Questions for Life:

Questions for Life Listen as Steve thinks through the questions he might use… 59 A teacher tells you that she believes reading aloud is an important component of reading workshop time, but she doesn’t use if often because the students don’t listen during the reading. They fidget and are seldom able to respond to questions she asks. http://pls3rdlearning.com/blog/steve-barkley/using-questions-in-coaching-conferences/

Role-play:

Role-play A – Beginning teacher who is bringing a concern or dilemma to the mentor/coach B – Observer C – Coach/mentor As the Coach discusses the concern that the teacher raises, work to use Questions for Life to explore next steps. Arrange an observation.

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Quick-Pick Interpretation of The Kaleidoscope Profile ® Results SENSORY STYLES Kinesthetic : Works best when able to move and do things with large muscles . Tactual : Works best when able to feel through small muscles and personal relationships . Visual : Works best when able to see, watch, read, and view. Auditory : Works best when able to hear, speak, discuss, and think out loud.

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Auditory Plus One The previous activity was an example of auditory plus tactual. What components are tactual?

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Auditory Plus Visual Graphic organizers are an example. Which ones fit in your instruction?

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Auditory Plus Kinesthetic Building in movement

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Model of the Earth Inner Core Tough Stuff Crust Rocks, Trees, Water Lithosphere Moving Plates Asthenosphere Oozy, Asthenosphere Deep Mantle Hot Rocks Outer Core Molten Magma

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Quick-Pick Interpretation of The Kaleidoscope Profile ® Results PERCEPTUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL STYLES Concrete : Prefers to work with real objects, sounds, colors, and experiences. Abstract : Prefers to work with symbols, words, numbers, and other abstractions. Global : Prefers to work with the “big picture,” large chunks, and intuitive leaps. Sequential : Prefers to work with step-by-step, orderly, logical information.

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GASC Diagram The information on this diagram is set up as though you are facing someone. Right Hemisphere Global Synthesis Stories Inductive Reasoning Concrete /Images Visuals Sounds Feelings Body Movements Left Hemisphere Sequential Analysis Classification Deductive Reasoning Abstract /Symbols Written Words Spoken Words Numerals Equations

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AS AG CG CS Organizational Continuum Perceptual Continuum Concrete Sequential part-by-part procedures step-by-step directions real world things Abstract Sequential discuss, read compute numbers sequentially and analyze verbally do things in their head Concrete Global trial/error real world in random discovery method of learning Abstract Global discuss ideas, concepts, pattern, associations play with words create metaphors

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GASC — Teaching Strategies Concrete/Sequential field trips organized step-by-step, with a goal structured, hands-on materials such as models structured demonstration lessons simulations that follow the rules using step-by-step directions to complete a task using concrete materials and following directions ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Abstract/Sequential lectures, with questions and answers in a step-by step progression audiotapes and/or videotapes in a step-by-step sequence almost all textbooks presenting logical thought and constructions explaining theories through deductive reasoning programmed instruction ___________________________________ ____________________________________

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GASC — Teaching Strategies Abstract/Global open-ended think sessions group discussions allowing think time for reflections before beginning a project or assignment allowing students to make intuitive leaps using the synthesis process to allow students to get an “Aha!” optional reading assignments _________________________________ __________________________________ Concrete/Global optional assignments involving real things problem solving simulations open-ended, discovery-type field trips learning through trial and error and seeing real objects committee work on real projects discovery learning ________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________

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Quick-Pick Interpretation of The Kaleidoscope Profile ® Results TEMPERAMENT STYLES Intuitive Feeler: Values integrity, relationships and personal and emotional issues. Intuitive Thinker: Values competence, rational reasoning, and intellectual complexities. Sensing Judger: Values authority, organization, predictability, and usefulness. Sensing Perceiver: Values action, excitement, style, competition, and immediate responses.

Differentiate for the At-Risk Learner:

Differentiate for the At-Risk Learner Kinesthetic Concrete Global Sensing Perceiver

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