Creative Juijitsu

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Survey of Creativity, Thinking and Problem Solving for the classroom and business.

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Creative Juijitsu:

Creative Juijitsu Creativity and Problem Solving i n business and your p ersonal life Copyright, 2012-13, T. Pitre, Sequim, WA

What you will learn* and know* upon completion:

What you will learn* and know* upon completion Definitions Implementation of creativity in your business Benefits to creative thought and practice Managing creative employees You will practice creative jujitsu to block, strike, disarm and disable non-creative thought and action * What is YOUR definition of learn Vs. know? 2

Forum; on line:

Forum; on line Visit our discussion forum: < here > Help for the use of the forum is found at: http://help.proboards.com / Share findings and collaborate with others. This is optional. If would like to collaborate with others, send email to me at: thomaspitre@gmail.com with “collaborate” in the subject line. I will make your email address available to like-minded students. 3

Exercise:

Exercise In a lecture I delivered, entitled Keep Grandma in The Crib , I asked that the students make a written list of possible uses for an ordinary, cardboard, toilet-paper tube. 4

Exercise:

Exercise A list of uses for tissue roll follows on the next slide , but we will give you FIVE minutes to make a list of your own…… GO 5 Illustration for “Put Grandma In The Crib” by Dale Faulstich, Sequim, WA

Exercise:

Exercise 1 PEN HOLDER FOR ARTHRITICS 2 NAPKIN HOLDER 3 SCARF STORAGE TUBE 4 FUNNEL 5 MEGAPHONE 6 GOLF BALL T 7 MEASURING DEVICE 8 ROLLING PIN 9 TOY TELESCOPE 10 HOT DOG STORAGE 11 ICE CUBE FORM 12 MODEL ROCKET SHIP 13 ROLL FOR POSTAGE STAMPS 14 SEND MESSAGES DOWN AN INCLINE 15 KINDLING 16 RAIN GAUGE 17 WHEEL FOR STEAMROLLER 18 LEG FOR PLAY CHAIR 19 TOY - CATCH SMALL BALL INSIDE 20 FALSE NOSE 21 SEE IF YOUR WATCH GLOWS IN THE DARK 22 RELAY RACE BATON 23 HAT FOR LINCOLN DOLL 24 A DOOR STOP 25 CUT OPEN AND USE FOR WRITING MESSAGES 26 PROTECTIVE HANDLE FOR HANDS TO CARRY SOMETHING HOT 27 HOLD OPEN A WINDOW 28 A BUSINESS CARD FOR TOILET PAPER SALESPERSON 29 TO HOLD COOKIE DOUGH 30 TO DIG IN SAND 31 FORM FOR SAND CASTLE MAKER 32 MONEY HOLDER 33 TEMPLATE TO DRAW CIRCLES 34 TEMPLATE TO DRAW RECTANGLE 35 TO BUILD TUNNELS - USE AS FORM 36 PENCIL HOLDER 37 CHICKEN DRUMSTICK HOLDER TO KEEP HANDS CLEAN 38 A HAMSTER DORMITORY 39 TOY CANNON 40 ONE PIPE OF A PANPIPE 41 SPLINT FOR DOG LEG 42 CAN BE USED TO FUNNEL A SMALL LIGHT FOR CLOSE WORK . 6

Characteristics of a Creative Person:

Characteristics of a Creative Person What is a creative person? Some think it is a person that ignores conventional wisdom and does not build on preexisting knowledge. Others believe that the creative person has a superior memory and the ability to synthesize information or the ability to relate ideas. Generally, creative people demonstrate mental quickness and have a wide range of interests -- but often do not have superior academic scores. A creative person may be able to "give many unusual uses for a brick or a cardboard box, but fail to perform originally in real-life situations." Any tests of creativity must be tied to reality so it will be known that a high score identifies a "creative" person. Source : [ Seventh Mental Measurements Yearbook , Pg. 448] 7

Characteristics of a Creative Person, 2:

Characteristics of a Creative Person, 2 Thinking Skills: Critical thinking involves logical thinking and reasoning including skills such as comparison, classification, sequencing, cause/effect, patterning, analogies , deductive and inductive reasoning , forecasting, planning, hypothesizing, and critiquing. Creative thinking involves creating something new or original. It involves the skills of flexibility, originality, fluency, elaboration, brainstorming, modification, imagery, associative thinking, attribute listing, metaphorical thinking, forced relationships. The aim of creative thinking is to stimulate curiosity and promote divergence. 8

Deductive vs. Inductive Reasoning:

Deductive vs. Inductive Reasoning DEDUCTIVE: though generalizations, we arrive at a conclusion . The premise of the argument guarantees the truth of the conclusion. INDUCTIVE: considers events and makes generalizations . It snowed last November, and has so every November on record. Therefore it will snow this November. 9

Higher Order Thinking:

Higher Order Thinking Higher order thinking skills are at the heart of thriving in a rapidly changing environment. The learner must be pro-active and self-directed. Higher order thinking skills include: Simple knowledge - facts, etc. - Ex.: California is in the West Comprehension - knowing how to add numbers Application of Knowledge - solving a word-type problem Analysis - breaking the problem into parts Synthesis - applying various techniques to solve the problem Metacognition - evaluation of the problem...thinking about thinking 10

Exercise:

Exercise Metacognition Express aloud the process you use when you are multiplying two, two-digit numbers. Choose two students, and have one of them metacognate, leave the room and have the 2 nd student do the same. Compare and contrast two, different, thinking and problem-solving styles. Use the next slide as an aid. 11

Exercise:

Exercise 685 x 759 ___ 12

An Exercise in Metacognition :

An Exercise in Metacognition Where do thoughts come from? What are thoughts composed of? What generates thoughts? Discuss, share. 13

Exercise:

Exercise Name all the reasons that this is a GOOD training aid: See this video: How to tie a bowline knot. < here > 14

Is a picture worth 1000 words?:

Is a picture worth 1000 words? 15 One of the main goals of visualization - making it possible to absorb large amounts of data quickly . The Chinese say one thousand and one words is worth more than one picture .

1000 Words??:

1000 Words?? 16

Enough Words?:

Enough Words? 17

The Creative Person in the Office:

The Creative Person in the Office There is always the possibility that the creative person will be ignored or rejected at companies that are highly structured. Why? Business schools cannot teach creativity, per se, and the education system in many Asian countries does not promote "creativity" -- that is, if many Asian workers still believe that they cannot leave work before the boss, that they must always work as a "team", that the "company" will be the only company that they will ever work for, etc. Recent press is saying that many companies prefer to hire art or science majors over business students. “ Firms are looking for students to enter the undergraduate-level jobs with some business acumen, but also maintain the broad exposure to their world and the thinking skills that come with a liberal arts education.” -Bloomberg Business Week 18

What is behaving “Intelligently” ?:

What is behaving “Intelligently” ? One of the behaviors is persistence . Another – is the willingness and wherewithal to use alternatives when solving problems. An analytical person might subconsciously collect evidence that their approach is working, and try an alternative if it is not. [Lateral or right brained thinking.] A puzzle is an example of an object that requires problem-solving skills and persistence. A puzzle requires trial and error. If one piece doesn't fit, another is tried. A system is used to keep track of the pieces used, those not used, and those that are possible fits. As a young man, Bill Gates prided himself on his ability to do jigsaw puzzles in record time. Autotelesis is doing something for its own sake. Working puzzles is a form of autotelesis.  Look at the maze on the next slide. 19

Mazes and Maze Tools:

Mazes and Maze Tools Why mazes? : 1. Autotelesis 2. Eye exercise 3. Disciplined thinking 4. Adhering to a plan 5. Building logic skills Free maze generator: http://worksheets.theteacherscorner.net/make-your-own/maze/ 20

Humor:

Humor Creative students have a better sense of humor than non-creative students. In studies, students were tested by being exposed to recordings of a comedian before taking the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking [ Followers of the Maharishi claimed that Transcendental Meditation techniques increased creativity. ] They scored higher than those that did not hear the recordings. Why? There was no connection between the recordings and the test material, yet they scored higher . They BELIEVED they were more creative, I assume. The measures of creativity on the test included: flexibility, fluency, and originality (FFO ). I have a large sign on my studio wall with the inscription , FFO [Flexibility…be flexible, work at fluency, and be original.] Name a couple of occupations that require inventiveness, original thought, etc. 21

Humor 2:

Humor 2 Humor requires a shift in perspective -- a new way to look at things, and the ability to shift direction, suddenly .  Some of my favorite types of jokes are known as "Shaggy Dog Stories."  Follow this on-line link to Alan Combs' SDS site: http://www.awpi.com/Combs/Shaggy/ Try your hand at writing one, yourself.  Here is one that I submitted to Alan, some time ago: A young intern was working in the emergency room one evening as his supervising physician pulled him aside. He was chastised for treating an attractive young woman that sat on a tube of super glue before he treated an old man that burned himself while cooking. The intern argued his case, but lost the argument and his job. He had not learned that a burn on the hand is worse than glue on the tush. 22

Scenario and Invention:

Scenario and Invention Let's search for an alternative for dealing with the following scenario: You must use liquid cleaner and a special eraser to erase and clean the "whiteboard" [A whiteboard is the plain white board used with special, dry-erase, colored, markers.] in your workspace each day. You have to use the eraser first, then you must spray some liquid from a bottle on to the board, followed by a wiping with the eraser, again, or a rag. One of the methods used to "invent" is to COMBINE. Combine the elements to "invent" a way of dealing with this scenario. 23

Creativity Tip:

Creativity Tip Scientists from Archimedes to Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein are said to have had flashes of inspiration while thinking about other things. A study suggests that simply taking a break does not bring on inspiration — rather, creativity is fostered by tasks that allow the mind to wander .' Before you work on your “invention”, take some time to some of the items YOU listed earlier for possible uses for a toilet tissue roll. Take ten minutes, then work on your solution for the Scenario/Invention exercise…combine elements to invent. 24

Solution to Scenario:

Solution to Scenario 25

Rearrangement – another Bridge to Creativity:

Rearrangement – another Bridge to Creativity Put some of these elements together to invent something: 1. Roller skates 2. A garbage can 3. Ladder 4. A dust broom 5. A paintbrush 6. A garden hose 7. A camping tent Describe your invention and the elements used. Use as many elements as you wish . Take your time. 26

Thinking ‘Otta da Box:

Thinking ‘Otta da Box 27 Connect ALL the dots with ONE, continuous line.

Dots and Line; Solutions:

Dots and Line; Solutions 28 L. To R., Top to Bottom: One line, fat line, fold paper and use one line.

The Tangram:

The Tangram 29 Any work with spatial relationships, geometric figures, etc. will increase your ability to understand objects in space. The TANGRAM is a simple tool. It is your job to: 1. Reproduce the tangram. The dimensions of the finished object will be 8 X 8 inches. Reproducing the tangram is an exercise in itself. 2 . You will reproduce it, then you will CUT the object into the pieces indicated on the graphic. This will produce, seven, individual pieces. You will then color or NUMBER each piece, mix them, and then use them to create an object that is 8 inches on the side. 3 . It would be a more effective exercise if you put the pieces in an envelope, and then waited a week or so before you worked with them again.

Mystery Objects:

Mystery Objects 30 What is this object? Write as if you knew exactly what it is, including it’s use/purpose. [2.5 cm = 1 inch] Pretend you are writing a catalog description of the article for sale.

Memory:

Memory 31 The object in the previous slide is a device to hold open books…especially sheet music. Lots more objects to guess at: http:// www.roadtripamerica.com/whatsit/whatsit.htm There are many techniques for remembering words, numbers, names, objects, etc. Memorize the following string of numbers: 3199290062466000 I will give you a simple technique for memorization in the next lesson. Here is a second string of digits to remember: 4193248842050 [Hint: associate the numbers with something you know.] Another technique is to put the objects in an environment and weave them into a story. Suppose you have the following objects to memorize: an orange (fruit) s tool, binoculars, rubber plant, clock, pad of paper, shutters, button. Some memory "experts" put the objects into an environment, and "walk" through the environment, viewing and/or interacting with the objects. How do you remember lists? When you forget someone's name, how do you recall it? What technique do you use?

Memory Tip:

Memory Tip 32 Walk through an environment to remember the objects listed in the previous slide. Orange (fruit) Stool, binoculars, rubber plant, clock, pad of paper, shutters, button. An orange sat on the stool. I could see it through my binoculars if I looked around the rubber plant . A large, black clock was drawn on my blue pad . Someone closed the shutters and pushed the button to call the police. You can remember things that are written on the board if they ARE big, and in COLOR a lot better than small, etc. I use MNEMONICS. Spring forward and fall back, for example. E G B D F (Every Good Boy Deserves Fun). How, for example, would your teach a child to remember the FOUR directions of the compass? How about: Never Eat Soggy Waffles ? How would you remember the mathematical order of operations when doing an algebra problem? Divide, Subtract, etc. Multiple and divide before you add and subtract? What would you use? Now….turn away from the screen and name the 7 objects, starting with ORANGE.

Memory Champion:

Memory Champion 33 Memory Champion, Nelson Dellis http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=RB_vmJnfE6k Youtube video . Try some of these techniques at home.

Your Creative Environment:

Your Creative Environment Cover as many walls in your work space as you can with plain newsprint or "butcher" paper . Hang big whiteboards in the conference room. Using colored pens, keep a list of your "brainstorms" and "daydreams" for one week. Link items together with arrows, circles and lines. See what develops.  See one of my Mindmaps (Tm) on the following slide. This method was used to design the original Disneyland. See the work of Mike Vance . Find him in your library, on the Web, or through Nightingale-Conant Corporation in Illinois. 34

Sample Mindmap:

Sample Mindmap 35

An Effective Organization…:

An Effective Organization… …is an organization that can balance adaptability and efficiency. Adaptability implies the willingness to change…especially OLD habits . New ways of doing things and the incorporation of the new ways as tools allows you and your company to increase creativity, motivation, and commitment. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” How do you know if it is broke? What if it is the process of being broke? A ccepting the current state of things as reliable, well-founded, or stable is ignorant and obstinate. 36

A Full-On Creative Workspace:

A Full-On Creative Workspace 37 See more workspaces, here: http:// tinyurl.com/bvvozzy

Creative Workstation:

Creative Workstation 38 The author’s workspace.

My Essay on an Environment conducive to creativity, follows. Three slides :

My Essay on an Environment conducive to creativity, follows. Three slides 39

My Essay on Environment, 1:

My Essay on Environment, 1 40 Poets and writers have many techniques to drive their inspiration and to satisfy their muse. One put apples in his desk. The smell of the sweet, decaying, apples was inspirational to him. [See: Paris Review series on working poets and writers, How Writer's Work ] My choice is to listen to music. Classical and Jazz seem to work best. Experts in learning theory suggest that the music you listen to have a "beat" that is synchronous with your heartbeat, respiratory rate, or at the same frequency as certain, brain waves - Alpha is ideal. The mean heart rate for individuals is 62.8-92.1 BPM (beats per minute), Here is a reference tool for music: http://web.forret.com/tools/bpm_tempo.asp?bpm=90&base=4&beat=5&title=Take+Five+(Dave+Brubeck+Quartet ) My belief is use whatever works best for you. Smell is a very powerful stimulus in my environment. It seems to generate the most memories. Music, on the other hand, generates and stimulates mood and mental imagery.

My Essay on Environment, 2:

My Essay on Environment, 2 41 When I was a artist/painter in the early 1960's, the radio was always on in my studio. Now, as I work at the computer, writing this lesson, Rossini Overtures are playing in the other room. The sun is shining through the front window, and if I stand, I can see the snow-capped Olympic range , just a few miles South of my office. The temperature must be a comfortable 68-70 degrees F. for me. I sit on a comfortable chair. It is fully adjustable, and has arms. I can swivel and turn freely in it to answer the phone, reach for my tea cup, or to greet my dog if she comes into the office to say hello. The room is simple. There are no visual distractions. I must purposefully focus on something to see a picture or scrap of text nearby. I often far-focus when working on the computer at long stretches. A ten hour day at the keyboard is not unusual for me when I am in the middle of a project. When I take breaks, I change everything. I usually go outside and play ball with RoseMary , or we both take a long walk. Some people would light a cigarette, pour themselves a shot of whiskey, or sip a sweet drink. Above all, you must take breaks when doing creative work.

My Essay on Environment, 3:

My Essay on Environment, 3 42 The best way to solve a problem that you have been working on for a long time is to go completely away from it. Stay away for a day if you have the discipline. When you come back to the problem, you will conquer it in seconds . Get some distance! I dislike interruptions. The interruptions should be self-generated. If I don't want to be disturbed by the phone, I turn off the bell and tell my computer to take voice messages. You must be in control of your environment. Being in control implies that you can change it at will. Change is very important. Radical change, adjustment and re-adjustment is key to the "creative" environment. Venetian blinds let you control the amount of light coming into your workspace. You can cast shadows if the sun is high, or you can darken the room to a dramatic whisper of light. I like to have information at hand. I have several, large whiteboards in the next room. I draw on them, write notes and reminders to myself, and I tape clippings, photos, etc. to the white, wallboard. If I didn't have the whiteboard, I would cover several walls with heavy poster board, and do the same thing. All this allows you to quickly scan important reminders, and objects and images that evoke thoughts that may (or may not), cause you to act. Thoughts are plentiful, but action is the key.

Changing Habits:

Changing Habits 43 Change your workspace. Do anything. Move your desk. Put in a smaller bulb in your desk lamp. Put in a larger bulb. Put a new picture on the wall to your left or right. Put a favorite object just out of reach. Do you have some favorite “toys” nearby. What are they. Do they "do" anything? What pictures do you have nearby? What are the pictures of? Open your wallet. Do you have pictures in your wallet? What are they pictures of? If you have a picture of your lover, what is the picture right next to it? Is it another picture of your lover, or is a picture of one of your children or one or both of your parents. What does your wallet tell about you? Do you carry your wallet with you when you leave the house? Your wallet is functions as a portable document carrier and photo gallery. If there was no such thing as a wallet, what would you carry? Do you have any idea how old the concept of the wallet/pouch/handbag is? Can you find out? Where would you look for information on this topic? .

Avoid Habit 2:

Avoid Habit 2 44 Tie your shoes differently, tomorrow. Get up ten minutes earlier. Drink your morning coffee or tea by the window, or in another room Change the radio station. Change your ways of thinking or NOT thinking. What do you learn from this?

Can Creativity be Taught?*:

Can Creativity be Taught?* 45 There are many views on this. If you GOOGLE “can creativity be taught”, you will read that it can, and that it cannot be taught. Creativity may be innate. You may be able to do creative things, but are your truly CREATIVE? Are your ideas original? If you feel that you are NOT creative, you may not be. Others may think you are creative, however. Is doing something “different” make you creative? Does painting a “pretty” picture prove you are creative? How are you treated at work by people that you consider creative? If you are truly creative, how do others that are not considered creative treat you? * Use Google a read about the topic. There is a lot of interesting information. Today, I got 12.4 million “hits” on the topic, via Google.

How can you put your new knowledge and discoveries to work?:

How can you put your new knowledge and discoveries to work? 46 Where do you start? Read your notes and review the presentation. Share your experiences and ideas with your colleagues. Try the scenario approach. Imagine a scenario where a creative solution would be the most expedient, a way of saving time, or assuring results. Have you broken down the problem into PARTS? Have you used the technique of RECOMBINATION? Have you tried the ADDITIVE method . Add something to the mix. On the other hand, what about the SUBTRACTIVE method? Remove something.

The Additive Method and The Wheel:

The Additive Method and The Wheel 47

References:

References 48 Ten Steps for Boosting Creativity: http :// www.jpb.com/creative/creative.php Wikipedia www. wikipedia .org / The Internet Archive http://archive.org/index.php FREE mind mapping software: http:// freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page Visit our discussion forum: < here > Help for the use of the forum is found at: http://help.proboards.com/

Thank You:

Thank You 49 Einstein said: “The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.”.

Acknowledgements::

Acknowledgements: You can find free templates like this on the Presentation Magazine website www.presentationmagazine.com 50 Thanks to Google for their BIG DATA Thank you to my neighbor, Ross Hamilton, for the picture of Mt. Olympus Thanks to YOUTUBE for all their “how to” videos Thanks to Dr. Edward de Bono for his old video classes Thanks to Mr. Wizard [ Donald Jeffrey Herbert Kemske ] who knew how to teach Thanks to Tony Buzan for inventing Mind Mapping. See Buzan video tutorials for his software: http://www.thinkbuzan.com/us/? utm_nooverride=1&gclid=COXi1-jp9q8CFQaFhwodHg-dUA Thanks to J. Burroughs, MIT Manager, Olycap, for editing help.

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