Autism Transition Slides

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Middle School Transition : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Middle School Transition Vanlede (2006) in Action-control beliefs and behaviors as predictors of change in adjustment across the transition to middle school believed that students need to think positively about school so that they may feel apt to adjust to middle school. This paper will examine the question whether providing special education students with a middle school transition program help prevent or decrease setbacks, anxiety and negative behaviors from occurring. “Particularly, students who transition into middle school can cause normal feelings of anxiety, fear, and excitement. However, these feelings can also turn into overt extreme behavior where students cannot adjust properly and may exhibit lower performance in grades, and poorer social skills” (Turner, 2007).

In Gray’s and Garand’s studies (1993 & 2006), there are several social story case examples that have been successful. : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 In Gray’s and Garand’s studies (1993 & 2006), there are several social story case examples that have been successful. A mother wrote a story for her autistic daughter who was 9 years old. She had a difficult time picking up her brother from school. Before the story was written for Liesl, she displayed aggressive behaviors throughout the entire routine. The same day the story was introduced to Liesl, she demonstrated the appropriate behaviors that were stated in the story. At times Liesl’s mother gave her verbal reminders about the story and prompted her to read the story. Another story was written for Max, a 6-year-old boy with autism because he had difficulty learning the classroom routine. A picture schedule, monitoring, and verbal prompting were other approaches used before the social story was introduced to Max, although they were proven unsuccessful. After the story was read to Max one time he began to follow the routine. Max still had a problem taking off his hat, although the hat was not mentioned in the story. The story was then revised and a sentence about the hat was added. After the story was modified Max’s problem was immediately corrected. An additional story was written for Max because he was aggressive towards his sister’s cat. Describing and modeling the correct behaviors were other techniques used to show Max how to treat the cat however they were not effective. The social story was immediately successful in teaching Max how to treat the cat. As a reminder, Max reviewed the story about once a month. In addition to the previous case studies, there have been other experimental studies involving the use of social stories with autistic children that have been successful and are included in y paper for further reading.

Social Story Therapy : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Social Story Therapy Social stories are an effective visual aid that provides individuals with social deficits information regarding situations they encounter or skills they are working on They benefit students with disabilities who have some basic language skills and who are functioning intellectually at the trainable mentally impaired range or higher

Social Story Therapy : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Social Story Therapy The information may include where a situation occurs, who is involved, how it begins and ends, what occurs, and why. Social stories can help improve a student’s behavior, teach a routine and translate goals into understandable steps.

Middle School Transition : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Middle School Transition The purpose of my research was to use social stories to teach and prepare special education students about the transition from elementary school to middle school

Middle School Transition : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Middle School Transition Culminating my research I was able to create a stable routine and plan of action for typical situations and any disruptive behaviors that occur. The end goal is to provide a confident transition for these special students who need extra assistance for this adolescent period.

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Data Observation : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 Data Observation Below I have included the qualitative data sheets to collect behavior occurrences and observations. Complete the data sheets daily including field notes and tallying the times the positive or negative behaviors occur.

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References : 

Susan Beech-Willis SPED530 References Gray, C.A. (2006). The New Social Story Book, Arlington: Future Horizons, p. v, 1-3,7. Gray, C.A., & Garand, J.D. (1993). Social stories: Improving responses of students with autism with accurate social information. Focus on Autistic Behavior, 8(1), 1-10. Retrieved May 15, 2010. Turner, S. (2007). Introduction to special issue: Transitional issues for K – 16 students. Professional School Counseling, 224-226. Vanlede, M., Little, T., & Card, N. (2006, June). Action-control beliefs and behaviors as predictors of change in adjustment across the transition to middle school. Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal, 19(2), 111-127.

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