Christology II

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

TODAY: Christology 2:

TODAY: Christology 2

The Early Christological Controversies:

The Early Christological Controversies It took many hundreds of years for the early Church to formalize its teachings on Christ. One early heresy was Arianism , the belief that the Son was not “one in being” with the Father. It began with a priest named Arius, who made statements that were disputed by his bishop, Alexander of Alexandria. Let’s look at what Arius believes…

Letter: Arius to his Bishop:

Letter: Arius to his Bishop From his letter to Alexander of Alexandria, his bishop: “…the Son, begotten by the Father, created and founded before the ages, was not before he was begotten. Rather, the Son…was caused to subsist by the Father. For he [Son] is not everlasting or co-everlasting or unbegotten with the Father. Nor does he have being with the Father…”

The Council of Nicea:

The Council of Nicea The Emperor Constantine called the Council of Nicea in 325 AD in order to solve the debate over Arianism. The emperor didn’t want religious division to cause problems in his empire.

The Council of Nicea:

The Council of Nicea The council declared Arianism a heresy. In its words: “We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God, eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, one in Being with the Father. Through him all things were made.”

Monophysitism:

Monophysitism After the Council of Nicea, another heresy arose in the Church. Some began claiming that Jesus was only divine – that he had only one divine nature . This is the heresy of monophysitism, from the Greek mono- (one) and physis (nature).

Christological Heresies:

Monophysitism Christological Heresies Jesus is only divine. Jesus is only human. Jesus is 50% human, 50% divine. These are all incorrect. Which is monophysitism?

Council of Chalcedon:

Council of Chalcedon The Council of Chalcedon was called in 451 to deal with the threat of monophysitism. The council declared that Jesus was 100% fully human and 100% fully divine.

The Council of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon The council officially professed: So, following the saintly fathers, we all with one voice teach the confession of one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ: the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man, of a rational soul and a body; consubstantial with the Father as regards his divinity, and the same consubstantial with us as regards his humanity; like us in all respects except for sin ; begotten before the ages from the Father as regards his divinity, and in the last days the same for us and for our salvation from Mary, the virgin God-bearer as regards his humanity;

The Council of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only-begotten, acknowledged in two natures which undergo no confusion, no change, no division, no separation; at no point was the difference between the natures taken away through the union, but rather the property of both natures is preserved and comes together into a single person and a single subsistent being; he is not parted or divided into two persons, but is one and the same only-begotten Son, God, Word, Lord Jesus Christ, just as the prophets taught from the beginning about him, and as the Lord Jesus Christ himself instructed us, and as the creed of the fathers handed it down to us.

The Council of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon “….like us in all respects except for sin.” Jesus lived a fully human life; he experienced all of the joys, pains, struggles that we experience. Jesus’ life and his obedience to the Father are models for us. His story is meant to be our story .

The Council of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon “…in two natures which undergo no confusion, no change, no division, no separation.” Jesus’ divinity and humanity are not in opposition with each other. In Jesus, humanity and divinity are fully united in an irrevocable way…for all humans. The possibility for union with God is possible for all humans through Jesus.

The Council of Chalcedon:

The Council of Chalcedon “at no point was the difference between the natures taken away through the union, but rather the property of both natures is preserved and comes together into a single person and a single subsistent being” Q: How can both natures “come together” in a single person? A: Because to be human is to be made in the image and likeness of God. Thus…the incarnation is not only about Jesus, but about us!

Why did the “Word become flesh”?:

Why did the “Word become flesh”? The Word became flesh: in order to bring us salvation by reconciling us with God, so that we might know God’s love, to be our model of holiness, AND… to make us sharers in God’s divine nature. also called divinization

authorStream Live Help