The Tale of Melon City

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A famous poem by vikram seth.

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` P PANKAJ

The Tale of Melon City :

The Tale of Melon City Vikram Seth

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Vikram Seth is an Indian poet, novelist, travel writer, librettist, children's writer, biographer and memoirist. Born and Early Life Vikram Seth was born to Leila and Prem Seth in Calcutta (now Kolkata). His family lived in many cities including the Bata Shoe Company town of Batanagar, Danapur near Patna, and in London. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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His younger brother, Shantum , leads Buddhist meditational tours. His younger sister, Aradhana , is a film-maker married to an Austrian diplomat, and has worked on Deepa Mehta's movies Earth and Fire. (Compare the characters Haresh , Lata , Savita and two of the Chatterji siblings in A Suitable Boy: Seth has been candid in acknowledging that many of his fictional characters are drawn from life; he has said that only the dog Cuddles in A Suitable Boy has his real name — "Because he can't sue". Justice Leila Seth has said in her memoir On Balance that other characters in A Suitable Boy are composites but Haresh is a portrait of her husband Prem.)

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Seth spent part of his youth in London but returned to his homeland in 1957. After receiving primary and commencing secondary education at the Doon School in Dehradun in India, Seth returned to England to Tonbridge School. From there, Seth studied philosophy, politics, and economics at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he developed an interest in poetry and learned Chinese. After leaving Oxford, Seth moved to California to work on a graduate degree in economics at Stanford University. Having lived in London for many years, Seth now maintains residences near Salisbury, England, where he is a participant in local literary and cultural events, having bought and renovated the house of the Anglican poet George Herbert in 1996, and in Delhi, where he lives with his parents and keeps his extensive library and papers.

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Seth self-identifies as bisexual. In 2006, he became a leader of the campaign against India's Section 377, a law against homosexuality. Work Themes A polyglot, Seth detailed in an interview (in the year 2005) in the Australian magazine Good Weekend that he has studied several languages, including Welsh, German and, later, French in addition to Mandarin, English (which he describes as "my instrument" in answer to Indians who query his not writing in his native Hindi), Urdu (which he reads and writes in Nasta’liq script), and Hindi, which he reads and writes in the Devanagari script. He plays the Indian flute and the cello and sings German lieder, especially Schubert.

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Business Acumen Seth's former literary agent Giles Gordon recalled being interviewed by Seth for the position: "Vikram sat at one end of a long table and he began to grill us. It was absolutely incredible. He wanted to know our literary tastes, our views on poetry, our views on plays, which novelists we liked." Seth later explained to Gordon that he had passed the interview not because of commercial considerations, but because unlike the others he was the only agent who seemed as interested in his poetry as in his other writing. Seth followed what he has described as "the ludicrous advance for that book" (£250,000 for A Suitable Boy) with £500,000 for An Equal Music and £1.4 million for Two Lives. He prepared an acrostic poem for his address at Gordon's 2005 memorial service:

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"Gone though you have, I heard your voice today. I tried to make out what the words might mean, Like something seen half-clearly on a screen: Each savoured reference, each laughing bark, Sage comment, bad pun, indiscreet remark. Gone since you have, grief too in time will go, Or share space with old joy; it must be so. Rest then in peace, but spare us some elation. Death cannot put down every conversation. Over and out, as you once used to say? Not on your life. You're on this line to stay." Poem

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Writing Travel writing: From Heaven Lake: Travels Through Sinkiang and Tibet His travel book From Heaven Lake: Travels Through Sinkiang and Tibet (1983) was his first popular success and won the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. It offers insight to Seth as a person, who is candid about the reality and effect of living abroad — though not in particular of being in diaspora — a theme which arises in his poetry but nowhere in his fiction: "Increasingly of late, and particularly when I drink, I find my thoughts drawn into the past rather than impelled into the future. I recall drinking sherry in California and dreaming of my earlier student days in England, where I ate dalmoth and dreamed of Delhi. What is the purpose, I wonder, of all this restlessness? I sometimes seem to myself to wander around the world merely accumulating material for future nostalgias."

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Poetry Seth has published five volumes of poetry. His first, Mappings (1980), was originally privately published; it attracted little attention and indeed Philip Larkin, to whom he sent it for comment, referred to it scornfully among his intimates, though he offered Seth encouragement. In 2009 Seth contributed four poems to Oxfam which are used as introductions to each of the four collections of UK stories which form Oxfam's 'Ox-Tales' book project.

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Novels in Prose The "novel in verse": The Golden Gate (Hybrid) The first of his novels, "The Golden Gate" (1986) is a novel in verse about the lives of a number of young professionals in San Francisco. The novel is written entirely in Onegin stanzas after the style Aleksandr Pushkin's Eugene Onegin. Seth had encountered Charles Johnston's 1977 translation of it in a Stanford second-hand bookstore and it changed the direction of his career, shifting his focus from academic to literary work. The likelihood of commercial success seemed highly doubtful — and the scepticism of friends as to the novel's viability is facetiously quoted within the novel; but the verse novel received wide acclaim (Gore Vidal dubbed it "The Great California Novel") and achieved healthy sales. The novel contains a strong element of affectionate satire, as with his subsequent novel, A Suitable Boy.

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"The Golden Gate, an opera in two acts with music by Conrad Cummings and libretto from the novel-in-verse by Vikram Seth adapted by the composer" is currently (2010) in development by Lively Works and American Opera Projects and receives a staged workshop production at the Rose Studio at Lincoln Center in New York City in January 2010.

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Vikram Seth's Works: Novels The Golden Gate (1986) A Suitable Boy (1993) An Equal Music (1999) A Suitable Girl (2013) Poetry Mappings (1980) The Humble Administrator's Garden (1985) All You Who Sleep Tonight (1990) Beastly Tales (1991) Three Chinese Poets (1992) The Frog and the Nightingale (1994)

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Children's book Beastly Tales (1991) Libretto Arion and the Dolphin (1994) for the English National Opera The Traveller [2008] with composer Alec Roth. Premiere, Lichfield Festival July 2008. Non-fiction From Heaven Lake (1983) Two Lives (2005)

The Tale of Melon City (After Idries Shah):

The Tale of Melon City (After Idries Shah) Idries Shah (16 June 1924–23 November 1996), also Sayyid Idris al-Hashimi an author in the Sufist tradition. Maintained spiritual teachings should be presented in forms and terms familiar in the community where they are to take root. Used stories and humor to great effect. Had a profound influence on several intellectuals.

About the poem.:

About the poem. ‘The Tale of Melon City’ runs like a folk tale. The city is called Melon City because its ruler is a melon. There is a curious tale about it. Once a fair and easygoing king ruled over a state. He got an arch built across the thoroughfare. As he passed under the low arch it struck his head and he lost his crown.

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He thought it a disgrace and ordered the chief of builders to be hanged. The chief lay the blame on the workmen. The workmen were surprised. They said that the bricks were made of wrong size. So the masons were thought guilty. The masons shifted the blame on the architect. The architect put the blame at the king’s door as he amended his original plan.

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The king sought a wise man’s counsel. He held the arch guilty and ordered it to be hanged. A Councillor objected to it as it had touched the king’s head. The people became restless. They wanted to see someone hanging. Only the king’s head could fit the noose. So he was hanged. It was now announced that the next man who passed

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The city gate would choose the king. An idiot came. He suggested ‘A Melon’. So melon was crowned the king. He was taken to throne. He was called melon king.

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Humour and irony: Construction of curved structure/ king’s riding under low arch and losing crown. The way accused appeal to the king/ self defence of architect / holistic blame game/ selection criteria of the wisest man ..aged, toothless and intestine less / the process is quite ridiculous. Whimsical king/ his fickle mindedness.

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In the city of which I sing There was a just and placid (easygoing) King.

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The King proclaimed an arch should be Constructed, that triumphally (in a victorious manner) Would span (cover) the major thoroughfare (main road) To edify (enlighten/educate) spectators there.

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The workmen went and built the thing. They did so since he was the King.

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The King rode down the thoroughfare To edify spectators there.

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Under the arch he lost his crown. The arch was built too low. A frown (facial expression of displeasure) Appeared upon his placid face. The King said, This is a disgrace. The chief of builders will be hanged.' The rope and gallows were arranged.

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The chief of builders was led out. He passed the King. He gave a shout, ‘O King, it was the workmen's fault' 'Oh!' said the King, and called a halt To the proceedings. Being just (And placider now) he said, 'I must Have all the workmen hanged instead.'

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The workmen looked surprised, and said, ‘O King, you do not realise The bricks were made of the wrong size.'

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'Summon the masons!' said the King. The masons stood there quivering. 'It was the architect...', they said,

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'Well, architect,' said His Majesty. 'I do ordain that you shall be Hanged.' Said the architect, 'O King, You have forgotten one small thing. You made certain amendments to The plans when I showed them to YOU ' The architect was summoned.

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The King heard this. The King saw red. In fact he nearly lost his head; But being a just and placid King He said, This is a tricky thing. I need some counsel. Bring to me The wisest man in this country.'

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The wisest man was found and brought, Nay, carried, to the Royal Court. He could not walk and could not see, So old (and therefore wise) was he -

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But in a quavering (trembling) voice he said, 'The culprit must be punished. Truly. the arch it was that banged (hit) The crown off, and it must be hanged'.

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To the scaffold (platform for execution of criminals) the arch was led When suddenly a Councillor said - 'How can we hang so shamefully What touched your head, Your Majesty?'

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'True,' mused the King. By now the crowd, Restless, was muttering aloud. The King perceived their mood and trembled And said to all who were assembled - 'Let us postpone consideration Of finer points like guilt. The nation Wants a hanging. Hanged must be Someone, and that immediately.'

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The noose (rope/loop) was set up somewhat high. Each man was measured by and by. But only one man was so tall He fitted. One man. That was all. He was the King. His Majesty Was therefore hanged by Royal Decree.

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'Thank Goodness we found someone,' said The Ministers, 'for if instead We had not, the unruly town Might well have turned against the Crown 'Long live the King!' the Ministers said. 'Long live the King! The King is dead.'

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They pondered the dilemma; then, Being practical-minded men, Sent out the heralds to proclaim (In His [former] Majesty's name): The next to pass the City Gate Will choose the ruler of our state, As is our custom. This will be Enforced with due ceremony.'

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A man passed by the City Gate. An idiot. The guards cried, 'Wait! Who is to be the King? Decide!' 'A melon,' the idiot replied.

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This was his standard answer to All questions. (He liked melons.) 'You Are now our King,' the Ministers said, Crowning a melon. Then they led (Carried) the Melon to the throne And reverently set it down.

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This happened years and years ago. When now you ask the people, 'So - Your King appears to be a melon. How did this happen?' they say, Well, on Account of customary choice. If His Majesty rejoice In being a melon, that's OK With us, for who are we to say What he should be as long as he Leaves us in Peace and Liberty?' The principles of laissez faire Seem to be well-established there.

Questions.:

Questions. Question.1. Narrate ‘The Tale Of Melon City’ in your own words. Ans. ‘The Tale Of Melon City’ runs like a folk tale. The city is called Melon city because its ruler is melon. There is curious tale around it. Once a fair and gentle king ruled over a state. He got an arch built across the thoroughfare. As he passed under the low arch it struck his head and lost his

Continued.:

Continued. crown. He thought it a disgrace and ordered the chief of builders to be hanged. The chief lay the blame on the workmen. The workmen were surprised. They said that the bricks were made of wrong size. So the masons were thought guilty. The masons shifted the blame on the architect who put blame at the king’s door as he had amended

Continued.:

Continued. his original plan. It is a practical situation and the habit of the people to have blame game. The king sought a wise man’s counsel. He held the arch guilty and ordered to be hanged. A councillor objected to it as it had touched the king’s head. The people became restless.

Continued.:

Continued. They wanted to see someone hanging. Only the king’s head could fit the noose. So he hanged. It was now announced that the next man passed the city gate would choose the king. An idiot came. He suggested ‘A Melon’. So melon was crowned the king. He taken to the throne. He was called melon king.

Question2.:

Question2. Who was held responsible for the disgrace? What do know about the king? Ans. The chief of builders was held responsible for the disgrace and ordered to be hanged. The chief called it the workmen’s fault. The king ordered to have all the workmen hanged. The workmen looked surprised but they blamed the wrong size of bricks for it. This shows the king’s fickle mindedness.

Question3.:

Question3. What argument did the architect advance in self defence? How did the king take it? Ans. The architect reminded the king that he had made certain amendments to the original plans of the architect. He suggested that it was the fault of the king himself. On hearing it, the king became so angry that he nearly lost his ability to act sensibly or calmly.

Question4.:

Question4. Comment upon the criteria of selection of the wisest man and the quality of counsel he offered. Ans. The king got confused and he sought the advice of the wisest man in the country. The criteria was the wisdom comes with grey hair. The old man they selected could not walk and see. He spoke in a trembling voice. The advice he offered was absurd. A lifeless object can not be deprived of life by hanging it.

Question5 :

Question5 Why did the king succumb to public demand? Ans. The king noticed that the crowd of spectators had became restless and people were muttering aloud. He judged their mood. He trembled to think of the consequences if they were deprived of the fun of watching some one being hanged. So, in order to save his skin, he ordered that someone be hanged immediately.

Continued.:

Continued. Question6.How was the new ruler of the state selected? Ans. The Ministers sent out messengers to declare that the next men to pass the city gate would choose the ruler of their state. An idiot happened to pass the gate. When asked to decide who was to be the king, he replied, ‘A melon’. This was his standard answer to all questions. The ministers declared that a melon would be their new ruler.

A PRESENTATION……:

A PRESENTATION…… Remember: Some people are born great, some upon greatness is thrust and some achieve greatness with their hard work.

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About me : Name : Pankaj singh Fb: pkheropankaj@gmail.com

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