physical geography of india

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

ppt

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Physical features of India:

Physical features of India Done by Prakhar Pandey class 9 th A

The Physical Geography:

The Physical Geography The Indian sub-continent Himalayas bound to the north World’s highest mountain range Bay of Bengal to the east Arabian Sea to the west Thar Desert to the west

India’s Landscape:

India’s Landscape Interior Deccan Plateau Abundant supply of arable land Extensive River System Large River System Ganges – India’s most important Many rivers produce hydro-electric power

Himalaya as Civilization:

Himalaya as Civilization Himalaya in Hindu legend Abode of Shiva and Durga The Great Himalayas, (the highest zone, consists of a huge line of snowy peaks with an average height exceeding 6100 m (20,000 ft). The width of this zone is about 24 km . the Middle Himalayas (also known as the Inner or Lesser Himalayas), (average height between 6000 and 10,000 ft, width of about 80 km ). and the Sub-Himalayas, which includes the Siwalik Range and foothills and the Tarai and Duars piedmont (an area of land formed or lying at the foot of a mountain or mountain range) (width of 48 km). Residence of 40 million people Densely populated valleys English hill stations Sparsely populated forests and natural resources Diversity of population Muslim, Hindus, Buddhists, Christians

PowerPoint Presentation:

WHAT IS OROGENY? Processes of mountain building

How are mountains formed:

How are mountains formed Distinctive patterns of deposition eugeocline, miogeocline Deformation Folding and thrust-faulting Metamorphism Intrusions: batholiths, etc Volcanic Activity

Mountains of India:

Mountains of India Mountainous Rim Hems in the country Has not prevented invasions however Himalayas Western Ghats Eastern Ghats Rainforests in the shadow of the Ghats

TYPES OF MOUNTAINS :

TYPES OF MOUNTAINS Volcanic: Shield and composite Fault-block: normal faulting and tension Folded: reverse faults and compression Complex: mixture of most of the above

Himalaya:

Himalaya Himalaya means abode of snow Origins of Himalaya The largest and highest mountain system in Asia, forming a broad continuous arc for nearly 2600 km (1600 mi) along the northern fringes of the Indian subcontinent, The Himalayas range, averaging 320 to 400 km (200 to 250 mi) in width, rises sharply from the Gangetic Plain. North of this mountain belt lies the Tibetan Plateau (Qing Zang Gaoyuan). Origins of snow fed river systems and movements of monsoon Dividing line between India and the rest of north Asia

PowerPoint Presentation:

Mauna Kea Shield volcano Hot Spot Basalt Mauna Loa in Background Kilaeua is Behind Mauna Loa

PowerPoint Presentation:

Kilaeua Newest ground in The world Asthenosphere coming To the surface

PowerPoint Presentation:

Composite Volcano Mt Rainier Compressive forces Subduction zones Andesitic composition

PowerPoint Presentation:

Guagua ichincha, Ecuador Quito in foreground Composite volcanoes explosive

PowerPoint Presentation:

Normal fault Footwall moves Up relative to Hanging wall Tension forces FOOTWALL HANGING WALL

PowerPoint Presentation:

Tilted fault-block range: Sierra Nevada from east, Steep side of block fault; Ansel Adams photo

PowerPoint Presentation:

Tilted Fault-block Sierra Nevada from west Side, low angle Yosemite valley the result Of glaciation on low-angle relief

PowerPoint Presentation:

Wasatch Range From Salt Lake City Typically fault- Block system

PowerPoint Presentation:

Alternating normal faults lead to a characteristic pattern called a Horst and Graben system. An area under tension will often have Multiple mountain ranges as a result.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Basin and range province: tilted fault-block mountains in Nevada. The results of a horst and graben system. Nevada is under tension Because of rising magma which is unzipping the system, all the way From Baja California Sierra Nevada and Wasatch Ranges part of this system

PowerPoint Presentation:

REVERSE FAULTS: Hanging wall moves up relative to footwall Result of compression: plates colliding Two types: low-angle or thrust faults, and high-angle reverse faults Individual layers can move 100’s of kilometers Alps are a great example

PowerPoint Presentation:

Thrust faults main cause Of folded mountains

PowerPoint Presentation:

Appalachian Mountains of the US

PowerPoint Presentation:

Atlas Mountains, Northern Africa

PowerPoint Presentation:

Classic folded terrain: well-developed anticline

PowerPoint Presentation:

ZAGROS MTS PERSIAN GULF Alternating Anticlines and Synclines

PowerPoint Presentation:

High-angle reverse faults Forms “Sawtooth Mtns” Flatirons classic example Sawtooth effect result of Differential erosion

PowerPoint Presentation:

White Cloud peak SAWTOOTH RANGE, IDAHO Alice Lake

PowerPoint Presentation:

COMPLEX MOUNTAINS Tend to have a little of Everything: volcanoes, Folds, thrust faults, normal faults ALPS HIMALAYAS

What happens at tectonic plate boundaries?:

What happens at tectonic plate boundaries?

PowerPoint Presentation:

Divergent Convergent Transform Three types of plate boundary

PowerPoint Presentation:

There are three styles of convergent plate boundaries Continent-continent collision Continent-oceanic crust collision Ocean-ocean collision Convergent Boundaries

PowerPoint Presentation:

Forms mountains, e.g. European Alps, Himalayas Continent-Continent Collision

PowerPoint Presentation:

Himalays

PowerPoint Presentation:

Called SUBDUCTION Continent-Oceanic Crust Collision

PowerPoint Presentation:

Oceanic lithosphere subducts underneath the continental lithosphere Oceanic lithosphere heats and dehydrates as it subsides The melt rises forming volcanism E.g. The Andes Subduction

PowerPoint Presentation:

Where plates slide past each other Transform Boundaries Above: View of the San Andreas transform fault

PowerPoint Presentation:

DONE BY PRAKHAR PANDEY OF CLASS 9 th A

authorStream Live Help