How To Take Good Notes for a Review of Literature

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NOTETAKING FOR YOUR BACKGROUND RESEARCH:

NOTETAKING FOR YOUR BACKGROUND RESEARCH Presentation by Deborah Bogard Delaware City Schools

Why is good Note-Taking so Important?:

Why is good Note-Taking so Important? Keeps you actively involved and engaged while reading Keeps you focused Provides frameworks and detail you’ll need when you write your report

Double Entry Journal Method of Note Taking:

Double Entry Journal Method of Note Taking Provides an outlet for your “Inner Commentator” Promotes active comprehension

Using Your Whole Brain:

Using Your Whole Brain LEFT SIDE RIGHT SIDE Logical Intuitive Linear Non-linear Mathematical Visual Language Spatial Analytical Creative Conscious Mind Subconscious Mind

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING:

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING Top of Page: Write the date and the source Draw a vertical line down the page - about 2/3 over to the right

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING :

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING LEFT SIDE OF PAGE Jot down the page # of the source Write down your notes, skipping lines to allow for later additions and corrections Record notes in the same order as they are in the reading

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING :

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING Right Side of Page Jot down your comments about the material: Examples QUESTIONS that come to your mind REACTIONS you have to the information Why this information is IMPORTANT NOTES TO YOURSELF about how this material can be used later in your PAPER Comparison, contrasts, CONNECTIONS with other readings

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING :

DOUBLE ENTRY NOTE-TAKING To Finish: Review your notes when you’ve completed the reading; highlight important points jot any additional questions, comments on the right

NOTE-TAKING TIPS:

NOTE-TAKING TIPS Write meaningful phrases Develop your own shorthand method Shorten words by omitting vowels: problem = prblm background = bkgd Use standard abbreviations (?IM spelling?) in place of words: with = w without = w/o Use the first part of a word for the full word: sociology = soc kinship = K because = BC most importantly = M Add symbols, pictures, and drawings to your notes as you REVIEW. Color-code them

WATCH FOR “CUE WORDS”:

WATCH FOR “CUE WORDS” For examples : For example, for instance, to illustrate For organization or chronological order : The six steps are…, next, finally first, secondly, third For additional points : Furthermore, in addition, also, moreover For opposing ideas : On the other hand, in contrast, although, however For similar ideas : Likewise, similarly, in comparison For exceptions : However, nevertheless, but, yet, still For emphasis : Above all, finally, more importantly For understanding : In other words, in essence, briefly For summarizing : In conclusion, to sum up, for these reasons, in a nutshell

SQ4R NOTE-TAKING FROM TEXT:

SQ4R NOTE-TAKING FROM TEXT S – SURVEY Q – QUESTION R – READ R – RECITE R – RITE R – REVIEW

WHY USE SQ4R?:

WHY USE SQ4R? In a study of upper-level students from a major university who used the SQ4R method for a semester. Every student: -Had a higher GPA -Had a faster reading rate -Improved comprehension -Spent 30% less time on studying than before Continually changes the pace, as you read one short section, using the QUESTION to READ to RECITE to RITE steps -Prevents boredom -Enhances concentration -Produces greater learning than the usual

S = SURVEY:

S = SURVEY To “X-Ray” the “bones” of the reading: As you survey keep asking yourself - What do I already know about the topic? Look at the title . Read the introduction or first two paragraphs Look over the headings : subheadings, boldface words, titles of graphs, charts, diagrams, etc. Read the Summary or last two paragraphs Take no more than 5 minutes to survey a reading

Q = QUESTION:

Q = QUESTION Sets a purpose for your reading Gets you ready to be actively engaged in your reading: Read over your Research Questions before you read the first section

R = READ :

R = READ To find the answers to your questions from the Questioning step: Read only a short section , one paragraph to one page, depending on the difficulty of the text

R = RECITE:

R = RECITE To find out what information you’ve gained from reading the short section: Summarize ALOUD what you read in your own words , for an immediate test of your comprehension Reciting : your most powerful tool for remembering information If you can’t say it, you don’t know it

R = “RITE” :

R = “RITE” NOW you should write brief notes in your notebook Record key names, dates, terms, definitions and ideas Mark any confusing portions for future clarification

R = RETURN :

R = RETURN Move on to the NEXT SECTION of the TEXT. Return to the “QUESTION” step and proceed through the “READ,” “RECITE,” and “RITE” steps

R = REVIEW:

R = REVIEW At the end of the reading, do one more brief review to polish your notes Take about 5 minutes to review the full reading, “resurveying” it again by looking over all headings, definitions, subheadings, boldface terms and major points While resurveying, use your notes to: Add important information Check your notes for accuracy Highlight or underline key points Add to your comments, questions

References:

References Burke, J. (2002). Tools for thought. Portsmouth: Heineman. California Polytechnic State University. Student Academic Services http://www.sas.calpoly.edu/asc/ssl/notetaking.systems.html Feldman, Shattles, & McKenzie. (2004).Oracle EDU 1110. Unpublished manuscript, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX Hoyt, L. (2002). Make it Real: Strategies for success with informational texts. Portsmouth: Heineman: 191-196. Miller, Ana, UTPB West Texas Literacy Center, PowerPoint presentation. Our world today: people, places, and issues. (2003). New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill: 22-25, 82-85, 192-196. Leonard, E. (2007). What every student should know about…study skills. New York: Pearson.

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