Photojournalism

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PHOTOJOURNALISM:

PHOTOJOURNALISM

Photojournalism is an exciting take on journalism- instead of communicating with words, you use images. You know what the old saying is: "A picture is worth a thousand words." But words are involved- how can we use them best in writing captions? These steps can help you to be a good journalist.:

Photojournalism is an exciting take on journalism- instead of communicating with words, you use images. You know what the old saying is: "A picture is worth a thousand words." But words are  involved- how can we use them best in writing captions? These steps can help you to be a good journalist.

Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that employs images in order to tell a news story. It is now usually understood to refer only to still images, but in some cases the term also refers to video used in broadcast journalism. Photojournalism is distinguished from other close branches of photography (e.g., documentary photography, social documentary photography, street photography or celebrity photography) by complying with a rigid ethical framework which demands that the work is both honest and impartial whilst telling the story in strictly journalistic terms. Photojournalists create pictures that contribute to the news media. TimelinessThe images have meaning in the context of a recently published record of events.ObjectivityThe situation implied by the images is a fair and accurate representation of the events they depict in both content and tone.NarrativeThe images combine with other news elements to make facts relatable to the viewer or reader on a cultural level.Like a writer, a photojournalist is a reporter but he or she must often make decisions instantly and carry photographic equipment, often while exposed to significant obstacles (e.g., physical danger, weather, crowds). :

Photojournalism  is a particular form of  journalism  (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that employs images in order to tell a news story. It is now usually understood to refer only to still images, but in some cases the term also refers to video used in broadcast journalism. Photojournalism is distinguished from other close branches of  photography  (e.g.,  documentary photography ,  social documentary photography ,  street photography  or  celebrity photography ) by complying with a rigid ethical framework which demands that the work is both honest and impartial whilst telling the story in strictly journalistic terms. Photojournalists create pictures that contribute to the news media. TimelinessThe images have meaning in the context of a recently published record of events.ObjectivityThe situation implied by the images is a fair and accurate representation of the events they depict in both content and tone.NarrativeThe images combine with other news elements to make facts relatable to the viewer or reader on a cultural level. Like a writer, a photojournalist is a  reporter  but he or she must often make decisions instantly and carry  photographic equipment , often while exposed to significant obstacles (e.g., physical danger, weather, crowds).

What is Photojournalism? :

What is Photojournalism? Journalism is the practice of reporting newsworthy events. Traditional journalism typically involves painting a picture of a newsworthy situation with words. Many times, these stories will be accompanied by a few pictures. Photojournalism, on the other hand, is the practice of creating a visual representation of a newsworthy event with several dynamic photographs. The photographs that a photojournalist takes are not usually easy to shoot. Instead of taking photographs of just objects and people photojournalists will try to get shots that are extremely difficult, unusual, or possibly even dangerous. Photojournalists will usually take pictures of newsworthy events as they are happening, and these pictures are often supposed to make the viewers feel intense emotions. For example, photojournalists may take pictures of riots in process or disaster survivors. Different news media publications will usually use the photographs used by photojournalists, including magazines, newspapers, and websites. Some photojournalists’ pictures might even be compiled into a commemorative book.

How to Write Good Captions in Photojournalism :

How to Write Good Captions in Photojournalism Find the photo you are going to write the caption for.  Look at it, and find the thoughts that you are trying to communicate via this picture. How is it relevant to the article or topic? Write this down (just quick notes, no need for complete sentences). For best results.

Slide 6:

Using the main idea of the picture, write a simple sentence that sums up everything that is happening in it.  If one sentence is not enough, use two. (Three is pushing it, so stay short.) For example, if your photograph were of a baby giraffe, you would write, "A giraffe calf with its mother."

Slide 7:

Add to the sentence(s) where this is taking place.  You can keep it short or be descriptive. To add to your giraffe sentence, you would write, "A giraffe calf with its mother at the crowded Zoo."

Slide 8:

Add a little detail.  Describe the main "character(s)" of the picture, or throw in an interesting fact or statistic that complements the topic. To your giraffe sentence, you would write, "A lanky newborn giraffe calf with its sampson mother at the crowded Zoo."

Slide 9:

What is  happening  in the picture?  Throw in some action to spice things up. For example, your sentence would now be, "A lanky newborn giraffe calf stumbles around its enclosure with its mother at the crowded Zoo."

Slide 10:

You're done!  Polish off your sentence and fix any possible spelling or grammatical errors, and you're as good as gold. This is one prize-worthy sentence!

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