Taste of autumn8

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YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS PRESENTATION HERE: http://ma-planete.com/pps/websiteview/catid_26/id_457227/title_Taste-of-autumn8/ SLIDESHARE LINK: https://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/taste-of-autumn8 Cultivation of quince may have preceded apple culture, and many references translated to "apple", such as the fruit in Song of Songs, may have been a quince. Among the ancient Greeks, the quince was a ritual offering at weddings, for it had come from the Levant with Aphrodite and remained sacred to her. Plutarch reported that a Greek bride would nibble a quince to perfume her kiss before entering the bridal chamber, "in order that the first greeting may not be disagreeable nor unpleasant". It was with a quince that Paris awarded Aphrodite. It was for a golden quince that Atalanta paused in her race. The Romans also used quinces; the Roman cookbook of Apicius gives recipes for stewing quince with honey, and even combining them, unexpectedly, with leeks. Pliny the Elder mentioned the one variety, Mulvian quince, that could be eaten raw. Columella mentioned three, one of which, the "golden apple" that may have been the paradisal fruit in the Garden of the Hesperides, has donated its name in Italian to the tomato, pomodoro.

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Slide1:

The taste of autumn 8

Slide2:

Roman School, 17th Century

Slide3:

Judith Leyster (1609-1660) Still life

Slide4:

Luis Meléndez (1716-1780) Still life

Slide5:

Luis Meléndez (1716-1780) Pomegranates, Apples, Azaroles and Grapes in a Landscape Museo del Prado, Madrid, 1771

Slide9:

Suzanne Valadon (French, 1865-1938) A Corner of the Table with Flowers and Fruit, 1926 Suzanne Valadon Still LIfe with Fruit Bowl 1920

Slide10:

Suzanne Valadon (French, 1865-1938) Still Life with Fruit and Glass 1910

Slide11:

Suzanne Valadon (French, 1865-1938) White Fruit Bowl Suzanne Valadon) Still Life with Tulips and Fruit Bowl

Slide12:

Suzanne Valadon (French, 1865-1938) Still Life with Basket of Apples Vase of Flowers 1928 Kalaychi Victoria (Ukraine, 1986) Season of quince

Slide13:

Kalaychi Victoria (Ukraine, 1986)

Slide14:

Kalaychi Victoria (Ukraine, 1986)

Slide15:

Chris Bingle (British) Crowned Quinces

Slide16:

David Olander (French) Quince and white wine Loire valley

Slide17:

Xenia Berestova Quince and fig Xenia Berestova Quince

Slide18:

Xenia Berestova Quince s

Slide19:

Xenia Berestova Quince s

Slide20:

Anastasia Nikolaevna Lazarevskaya Elephant, pebbles, quince Svetlana Tursunova Modern art

Slide21:

B.V. Shcherbakov Quince

Slide22:

Evgenia Antipova (Russian, 1917-2009) Quince on the Green Table. 1966

Slide23:

Irina Krivtsova Natalia Kulikovska Quince

Slide24:

Maria Pereyaslavets Quince on a tray

Slide25:

Melik Agamalov (Azerbaijan, 1962)

Slide26:

Dmitry Sevryukov Quince Monique Shaw Coings, raisins, panier au torchon bleu

Slide27:

Roberta Rossi Mela cotona 2010 Roberta Rossi Mela cotona 2004

Slide28:

Dmitry Spiros Quince and wine Eliot Hodgkin Quinces (1969)

Slide29:

Jasmine Diez Vlad Gilgur (Russia) Quince and Coffee Pot

Slide30:

Vlad Gilgur (Russia) Fruits and Liqueur

Slide31:

Judith Lamb Basket of quinces

Slide32:

Julian Merrow-Smith (British, 1959) Quinces in a spanish bowl

Slide33:

Julian Merrow-Smith (British, 1959) Still life with jug and quince

Slide34:

Julian Merrow-Smith (British, 1959) Still life with quince, plum and bowl

Slide35:

Julian Merrow-Smith (British, 1959) Quince and Delft vase

Slide36:

Julian Merrow-Smith (British, 1959) Quince and Delft vase

Slide37:

Teresa Ulldemolins Aguadé De trenzas y membrillos Marian Blank (Australia) Still Life with Quinces

Slide38:

Sergei Svetlakov Quince and Yellow Pears Sergei Svetlakov Quinces and pomegranate

Slide39:

Miguel Angel Nuñez (Uruguay, 1966) Copa con tres membrillos

Slide40:

Miguel Angel Nuñez (Uruguay, 1966) Membrillos in bolsa Miguel Angel Nuñez Membrillos 2006

Slide41:

Miguel Angel Nuñez (Uruguay, 1966) Membrillos

Slide42:

Miguel Angel Nuñez (Uruguay, 1966) Tres membrillos

Slide43:

Mihai Olteanu (Romanian, 1962) Still life

Slide44:

Mohammed Fachatti (Maroc, 1971) Nature morte au potimarron 2011

Slide45:

Mohammed Fachatti (Maroc, 1971) Nature morte aux coings 2007

Slide46:

Mohammed Fachatti (Maroc, 1971) Nature morte aux coings (fragment)

Slide47:

Roberta Rossi Mela cotona 2007 Ricardo Sanjuan Bodegón de Membrillos

Slide48:

Oleg Dobrovolschi (Moldova, 1970) Gutui 2003

Slide49:

Oleg Dobrovolschi (Moldova, 1970) Still life Pascal Giroud Coing

Slide50:

Pascal Giroud Coing et Pomme

Slide51:

Rosa Gutierrez Membrillos Trandafir Marian (Romanian) Ulcior cu pas ă re

Slide52:

Vladimir Palamarciuc (Moldova, 1945) Darurile toamnei 2004

Slide53:

Oliver Clare (1852–1927) Quince and Blackberries Herbert Art Gallery & Museum

Slide54:

Raúl Anguiano (Mexic, 1915-2006) Naturaleza muerta con membrillos, 1944

Slide55:

Tanya Balaeva (Russia, 1975) Still life with Green Kandil Apples and Quinces

Slide56:

Theresa Stabb Still Life with Quinces

Slide57:

Vadim Cre ț u - Gutui

Slide58:

Vadim Cre ț u - Flori albe Vadim Cre ț u - Gutui e

Slide59:

Vadim Cre ț u - Gutui

Slide60:

Vadim Cre ț u - Ghiocei

Slide61:

Vadim Cre ț u - La fereastr ă Vadim Cre ț u - Flori

Slide62:

Vadim Cre ț u - Natură statică cu vas alb, vas de metal și gutuie

Slide63:

Volpetiz , Volnei Cardoso Petiz (Brasil, 1941) Marmelos

Slide64:

Vicente Pastor Navarrete – Bodegón con Me m brillos

Slide65:

Victor Teterin (Russian, 1921-1991) Quince and Teapot

Slide66:

Victor Teterin (Russian, 1921-1991) Mele cotogne e colori, 1967

Slide67:

Yingzhao Liu (Chinese, 1956)

Slide68:

Yingzhao Liu (Chinese, 1956) Sea Snails and Pineapple Quince on the Marble

Slide69:

Teresa Lapayese (Spain, 1966) Membrillos con porcelana

Slide70:

Teresa Lapayese (Spain, 1966) Membrillos

Slide71:

Teresa Lapayese (Spain, 1966) Membrillos

Slide72:

Nikolaos Lytras (Greek, 1883-1927) Peeling quinces Cultivation of quince may have preceded apple culture, and many references translated to "apple", such as the fruit in Song of Songs, may have been a quince. Among the ancient Greeks, the quince was a ritual offering at weddings, for it had come from the Levant with Aphrodite and remained sacred to her. Plutarch reported that a Greek bride would nibble a quince to perfume her kiss before entering the bridal chamber, "in order that the first greeting may not be disagreeable nor unpleasant". It was with a quince that Paris awarded Aphrodite. It was for a golden quince that Atalanta paused in her race. The Romans also used quinces; the Roman cookbook of Apicius gives recipes for stewing quince with honey, and even combining them, unexpectedly, with leeks. Pliny the Elder mentioned the one variety, Mulvian quince, that could be eaten raw. Columella mentioned three, one of which, the "golden apple" that may have been the paradisal fruit in the Garden of the Hesperides, has donated its name in Italian to the tomato, pomodoro.

Slide73:

Sound : Celine Dion & Mario Frangoulis - The Greatest Reward ; Mario Frangoulis - Dicitencello Vuje Text and pictures: Internet All  copyrights  belong to their  respective owners Presentation : Sanda Foi ş oreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela   2017

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