Morocco again18 Volubilis Archaeological Site part2

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YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS PRESENTATION HERE: http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/morocco-again18-volubilis-archaeological-site-part2 Thank you! Morocco, officially known as the Kingdom of Morocco is a sovereign country located in the Maghreb region of North Africa. Morocco has a population of over 33.8 million and an area of 446,550 km2 and its capital is Rabat. An UNESCO World Heritage site since 1997, Volubilis located at the foothills of the Zerhoun mountains, covers a sprawling area of 42 hectares. It had been developed since the 3rd century BC, but reached its apex as the capital of the kingdom of Mauritania (a former tribal Berber kingdom) under Roman rule

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Archaeological Site 18 Volubilis

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Bust of Juba II, artifact from Volubilis Rabat Archaeological museum

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The houses found at Volubilis range from richly decorated mansions to simple two-room mud-brick structures used by the city's poorer inhabitants. The city's considerable wealth is attested by the elaborate design of the houses of the wealthy, some of which have large mosaics still in situ. They have been named by archaeologists after their principal mosaics (or other finds) House of the Knight takes its name from a bronze statue of a rider found here in 1918 that is now on display in the archaeological museum in Rabat ©Trevor

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©Trevor House of the Knight

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House of the Knight

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House of the Knight

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House of the Knight

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House of the Knight, Mosaic of Bacchus coming across the sleeping Ariadne (who later bore him six children)

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House of the Knight

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House of the Knight

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House of the Knight Roman mosaic of Bacchus and Ariadne naked and asleep on the beach at Naxos(detail)

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The House of the Ephebe was named after a bronze statue found there (now in Rabat Archaeological museum) © jacqueline poggion © yves Tennevin

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Atrium with lobed fountain in the House of the Labors of Hercules

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House of the Labors of Hercules

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House of the Labours of Hercules, atrium

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House of the Labors of Hercules where the mosaic is almost a comic caricature, recounting the Twelve Labours of Hercules – many of which are reputed to have occurred in Morocco

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House of the Labours of Hercules, detail

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House of the Labours of Hercules, detail

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House of the Labours of Hercules, detail

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House of the Labours of Hercules, detail

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Musician with double flute from four seasons mosaic (detail) House of Dionysus

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House of Dionysus

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House of Dionysus Mosaic of the Four Seasons and four muses (fragment)

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Some of Volubilis' finest mosaics are in the House of Venus, once home to King Juba II and now conveniently marked by a distinctive lone cypress tree Appropriately, the two best mosaics have semi-romantic themes. The first is   Diana Bathing and depicts the virgin goddess being glimpsed in her bath by the hunter Acteon

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Mosaic of Diana and Actaeon, House of the Procession of Venus

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Mosaic of Diana and her nymph surprised by Actaeon while bathing, from the House of Venus

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Mosaic of the Abduction of Hylas by the Nymphs, an erotic composition showing Hylas being lured away from his duty by two beautiful nymphs

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Mosaic of the  Abduction of Hylas by the Nymphs , an erotic composition showing Hercules’ lover Hylas being lured away from his duty by two beautiful nymphs

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In classical mythology, Hylas was a youth who served as Heracles' companion and lover

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Nymph on horseback with fish tail, mosaic in House of Venus

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Sound : Saïd Chraïbi - Maquamat 2016 Text: Internet Pictures: Internet Sanda Foi ş oreanu Sanda Negru ț iu Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi ş oreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela The Dog of Volubilis  was found in 1916, dating back to Hadrian in the early 2nd century

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