6 basic classes of nutrients 07 1

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6 basic classes of Nutrients : 

6 basic classes of Nutrients Protein Carbohydrates Vitamins Minerals Fats Water

Nutrition: is the process by which the body takes in and uses food.: 

Nutrition: is the process by which the body takes in and uses food. Nutrients: Chemical substances in food that helps maintain the body. Some help to supply energy All help to build tissues and cells Regulates body processes (like Breathing) NO ONE food (or supplement) provides all the nutrients your body supplies.

A calorie is the energy value of food. Protein=4 cal/gm of food Carbohydrates=4 cal/gm of food Fat=9 cal/gm of food: 

A calorie is the energy value of food. Protein=4 cal/gm of food Carbohydrates=4 cal/gm of food Fat=9 cal/gm of food Teen boys- Min. of 2800 calories/day Teen girls- Min. of 2200 calories/day Metabolism: is the chemical processes by which your body breaks down food to release the energy Diet: all the foods a person eats over a long period of time. For good health: number of calories in the food should equal the amount of calories needed in your body.

Slide4: 

Trans fat: unsaturated fat formed from hydrogenation: an unsaturated fat formed during the hydrogenation of vegetable oils to produce margarine.Trans-fatty acids are viewed as a health risk because they raise cholesterol levels.

Carbohydrate: body’s chief source of energy (preferred choice of calories.): 

Carbohydrate: body’s chief source of energy (preferred choice of calories.) 2 types of carbohydrates Simple or sugars, are present naturally in fruits, some vegetables and milk (provide quick energy) Complex or starches, are found in great supply in rice and other grains, seeds, nuts, dried peas and potatoes (provide Long lasting energy)

Carbohydrate Function: 

Carbohydrate Function What it does for the body Furnishes body with energy Helps digest fats efficiently Used for growth and maintenance (if not for energy) Rich in fiber- helps to prevent cancer

Protein: nutrients that help build and maintain body tissues: 

Protein: nutrients that help build and maintain body tissues Made up of small units called Amino Acids Vital: chemical compound found in every body cells Sources: meat, poultry, fish, nuts, peas, milk, eggs, and dried beans

Protein Function: 

Protein Function Provide amino acids essential for growth, maintenance and repair of tissues Aids in formation of enzymes, some hormones and antibodies. Antibodies help identify and destroy bacteria and viruses that cause disease in the body Regulates body processes When used for energy above is not available.

Fats: represent the most concentrated form of energy available.: 

Fats: represent the most concentrated form of energy available. Lipids: fatty substance that doesn't dissolve in water. Saturated fats found in meat or dairy products (Bad Fats) Unsaturated fats are found in plant products (Good Fats) Cholesterol: fatlike substance produced in the liver of all animals . Your body needs some cholesterol, like fat but it can make what it needs.

Function of Fat: 

Function of Fat A source of energy Essential for making certain vitamins available (A,E,D & K) Stored as fat tissue which surrounds and protects organs Linoleic acid an essential fatty acid essential for growth and healthy skin Sources: ice cream, milk, cheese, butter, milk, egg yolk, and corn oil.

Vitamins: helps regulate many vital body processes, including the digestion, absorption and metabolism of other nutrients: 

Vitamins: helps regulate many vital body processes, including the digestion, absorption and metabolism of other nutrients Classified into two groups: water-soluble and fat-soluble. Water-soluble: dissolve in water and thus pass easily into the bloodstream in the process of digestion. Excess amounts are excreted in urine. Fat-soluble: absorbed and transported by fat. Vitamin A, E, D and K

Fat-Soluble Vitamins: 

Fat-Soluble Vitamins

Water-Soluble Vitamins: 

Water-Soluble Vitamins

Minerals: assist in the regulation of chemical reactions: 

Minerals: assist in the regulation of chemical reactions Body can not make minerals Minerals are manufactured by non living things, minerals occur naturally in rocks and soil. There are 24 different minerals. You need 6 of the minerals: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chlorine. You only need a trace of other minerals.

Minerals: 

Minerals

Minerals cont.: 

Minerals cont.

Water: essential for all life processes, including energy production: 

Water: essential for all life processes, including energy production 65% of body weight Nearly all body chemical reactions take place in water Makes up blood Sources: water, juices, soups, vegetables, watermelon, apples

Water function : 

Water function Helps in the digestive process Removes body waste (urine and large intestines) Regulated body temperature (sweat) Lubricated joints and cushions organs and tissues We require at least 8 glasses of fluid per day. Some people may need more.

End of Part 1: 

End of Part 1 New section

How to tell if it’s a serving size: 

How to tell if it’s a serving size Here are some examples of serving sizes, for use in gauging your portions: · Three ounces of cooked meat, fish or poultry is the size of a deck of cards · Two tablespoons of peanut butter is the size of a golf ball · A medium piece of fruit looks like a baseball · A medium bagel is the size of a hockey puck · One ounce of cheese is the size of four dice · A small baked potato is the size of a computer mouse · The serving size for raw vegetables, yogurt and fruit is one cup – which will fit into an average woman’s hand.

What is a serving size?: 

What is a serving size? Bread and Grain 1 slice of bread ½ cup cooked rice, pasta or cereal ½ bagel or English Muffin 3-4 plain crackers 2 medium cookies Meat, nuts and beans 2 ½ to 3 ounces of cooked beef, pork, lamb, poultry or fish ½ Cup cooked beans 1 egg 2 tablespoons peanut butter 1/3 Cup nuts

More serving sizes…: 

More serving sizes… Fruits 1 medium raw ¾ cup fruit juice ½ cup chopped, cooked or canned (beware of heavy syrup) ¼ C dried Vegetables ½ cup chopped, cooked or raw 1 Cup raw, leafy ¾ vegetable juice ½ Cup scalloped potatoes 10 French fries

RDA : 

RDA Recommended Daily Allowance Based on a 2000 calorie diet

Total Fat : 

Total Fat Less than 65 grams

Saturated Fat: 

Saturated Fat Less than 20 Grams

Cholesterol: 

Cholesterol Less than 300 Milligrams

Sodium: 

Sodium Less than 2,400 Milligrams

Total Carbohydrates: 

Total Carbohydrates 300 grams

Protein: 

Protein 50 grams

Dietary Fibers: 

Dietary Fibers 25 Grams