the rime of ancient mariner part 3 and summary of the poem

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Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III

Introduction:

Introduction Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born in Ottery St Mary, Devonshire on October 21, 1772. He studied at Jesus College. He worked with William Wordsworth to produce Lyrical Ballads. In 1799, Coleridge fell in love with Sara Hutchinson, where they both worked on the political magazine: The Friend. After a short wile, Coleridge became addicted to opium, and settled down in Highgate , and died on July 25, 1834.

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III "There passed a weary time. Each throat Was parched, and glazed each eye. A weary time! a weary time! How glazed each weary eye - When looking westward, I beheld A something in the sky. At first it seemed a little speck, And then it seemed a mist; It moved and moved, and took at last A certain shape, I wist . A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist ! And still it neared and neared: As if it dodged a water-sprite, It plunged and tacked and veered.

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, We could nor laugh nor wail; Through utter drought all dumb we stood! I bit my arm, I sucked the blood, And cried, A sail! a sail! With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, Agape they heard me call: Gramercy! they for joy did grin, And all at once their breath drew in, As they were drinking all. See! see! (I cried) she tacks no more! Hither to work us weal; Without a breeze, without a tide, She steadies with upright keel!

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III The western wave was all a-flame, The day was well nigh done! Almost upon the western wave Rested the broad bright sun; When that strange shape drove suddenly Betwixt us and the sun. And straight the sun was flecked with bars, (Heaven's Mother send us grace!) As if through a dungeon-grate he peered With broad and burning face. Alas! (thought I, and my heart beat loud) How fast she nears and nears! Are those her sails that glance in the sun, Like restless gossameres?

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III Are those her ribs through which the sun Did peer, as through a grate? And is that Woman all her crew? Is that a Death? and are there two? Is Death that Woman's mate? Her lips were red, her looks were free, Her locks were yellow as gold: Her skin was as white as leprosy, The Nightmare Life-in-Death was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold. The naked hulk alongside came, And the twain were casting dice; `The game is done! I've won! I've won!' Quoth she, and whistles thrice.

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III The sun's rim dips; the stars rush out: At one stride comes the dark; With far-heard whisper o'er the sea, Off shot the spectre-bark. We listened and looked sideways up! Fear at my heart, as at a cup, My life-blood seemed to sip! The stars were dim, and thick the night, The steersman's face by his lamp gleamed white; From the sails the dew did drip - Till clomb above the eastern bar The horned moon, with one bright star Within the nether tip.

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III:

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Part III One after one, by the star-dogged moon, Too quick for groan or sigh, Each turned his face with a ghastly pang, And cursed me with his eye. Four times fifty living men, (And I heard nor sigh nor groan) With heavy thump, a lifeless lump, They dropped down one by one. The souls did from their bodies fly, - They fled to bliss or woe! And every soul it passed me by, Like the whizz of my crossbow!"

Paraphrase:

Paraphrase He sees a ship far off. They rejoice thinking they are saved, but then despair when they wonder how a ship can sail without wind. It is a skeleton ship with only a woman, Life-in-Death, and a mate, Death, for crew. They play dice for the crew and she wins. The sun sets and the skeleton ship departs. The crew dies, one by one, and their souls fly out.

Paraphrase:

Paraphrase Each sailor was thirsty, and tired, but saw something when they looked westward It looked like a speck, but then the speck began to move, and began to take shape. The shape began to come closer, and steered on course. Their throats were dry and were too tired to make a sound. He managed to shout a sail, which means he sees a ship. They cheered the sight of the ship. They saw the ship working it’s way towards them, without a breeze or a tide. It was sundown when the ship pulled next to them. The ship was sitting between them and the sun. He questions the fact that the ship is near.

Paraphrase:

Paraphrase He looks onboard and finds that a woman and death being the only crew of the ship. He describes her as a beautiful life-in-death. They play a game of dice, and she wins. The sun goes down and the ghost ship leaves. They all looked up at the dim stars, and he looked at them and saw they had pale faces. One after the other they began to die. Each of them would thump to the ground dead. Their souls flew off like the whiz of his crossbow.

Diction:

Diction The author uses formal language. The poet creates vivid expressions, he uses words that help describe what is going on within the poem. And give you the feel as if you were there with them on the ship. There aren’t any words that have any other connotations. The word albatross was probably used to describe the ghost ship.

Tone and Mood:

Tone and Mood In the beginning of the poem, the author conveys a sense of hope. This is soon replaced with misery and hopelessness. The poem is a sad poem. The irony of the poem comes from the part where the boat who they think is there to rescue them in fact kills them. This poem conveys feelings of hopelessness.

Rhetorical Situation:

Rhetorical Situation The main speaker of this poem is the sailor, who speaks about the crew and the terrible experience on the ship. The sailor is not directly speaking to you, but saying what is happening without a truly visible audience.

Figurative Languages:

Figurative Languages The poem contains similes such as: “And every soul it passed me by, Like the whizz of my crossbow!”, “Are those her sails that glance in the sun, Like restless gossameres? ”, and “Her skin was as white as leprosy…”. The poem gives personifications to the waves such as: “The western wave was all a-flame ”

Imagery:

Imagery You can just imagine the sailor on the ship not having food or water for many dies on the edge of death. When he sees a ship that can come to the rescue of him and his crew it turns out to be a ghost ship. The author describes how his body looks and how he describes the other ship coming. The poem uses symbolism when the Death and Life-In-Death are playing the dice game to see the future of his crew. Also when he is describing what the other person looks like.

Sound:

Sound The poem has an external rhyme scheme. The poem repeats a few words, the author refers to the ship as a speck more than once, and repeatedly says: “With throats unslaked, with black lips baked ” The poem also contains alliteration: “Four times fifty living men” When reading the poem, the reader most usually finds the words to be a euphony.

Structure of the Poem:

Structure of the Poem The poem is written as a ballad. The poem is written in stanza form. The poem also has a rhyme scheme: a b b a c d d c… "Poetry Analysis: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Coleridge - by Paul Dice - Helium." Helium - Where Knowledge Rules . Web. 11 Feb. 2011. <http://www.helium.com/items/370780-poetry-analysis-the-rime-of-the-ancient-mariner-by-samuel-coleridge>.

Conclusion/Evaluation:

Conclusion/Evaluation The mood set by the author was very clear. The saddening mood is set with the departure of the ghost ship, which is the main part of the poem that sets the mood. The strongest element to the poem, was the use of imagery. It described and set the mood for the poem. The weakest part of the poem was the rhyme scheme, because it is not highly visible, and sometimes gets in the way.

Personal Reactions:

Personal Reactions The poem is long, but does not describe what happens. It skips, and does not go in detail as to what happens. The imagery was very descriptive, even though the poem lacked a good description of the plot. The poem gave us a feeling of despair at the end.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Science Spirituality Vs. Some critics maintain that this ballad was an exploration, by Coleridge, into the science vs. spirituality debate: There are many mysterious fantastical images,  the “ glittering eye ” with its “ strange power …”  the “ polar spirits ” and “ seraph band …” The Latin preface says, “ Human cleverness has always sought knowledge of these things, never attained it . ” He was at a point in his life where he was more concerned with the rational than the empirical, this poem was an exploration of the former.

Short Summary of the whole poem :

Short Summary of the whole poem

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Samuel Taylor Coleridge

PowerPoint Presentation:

An Ancient Mariner stops one (of three) on his way to a wedding. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner The wedding guest is mesmerized by the Mariner’s passion and begins listening to the story.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The Mariner’s Tale : Their ship is driven south, by a storm, to a place of “mist and snow.” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

“The ice was here, the ice was there, The ice was all around: It cracked and growled, and roared and howled, Like noises in a swound!” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

Surrounded by ice. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

An albatross appears. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The albatross leads them out of the fog. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The Mariner shoots the albatross. At first the crew condemns him, but when a favorable breeze appears, they justify his action. This implicates them in his crime. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

Later, the wind stops and the ship is stranded for days, “As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean.” “Water, water, every where, and all the boards did shrink; Water, water, every where, nor any drop to drink.” The crew blames the Mariner for no wind and hangs the albatross around his neck as punishment. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

A ghost ship approaches with a Specter-Woman and her Death-Mate as crew. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

“Death” and “Life in Death” roll dice for the lives of the ship’s crew. “Life in Death” wins. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

“Each turned his face with a ghastly pang, and cursed me with his eye” “With heavy thump, a lifeless lump, they dropped down one by one.” “The souls did from their bodies fly, - They fled to bliss or woe! And every soul, it passed me by, Like the whizz of my cross-bow!” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

“Alone, alone, all, all alone, alone on a wide wide sea! And never a saint took pity on my soul in agony.” “Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse, and yet I could not die.” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

“Beyond the shadow of the ship, I watched the water-snakes” “O happy living things! No tongue their beauty might declare: A spring of love gushed from my heart, and I blessed them unaware” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The curse is lifted and the albatross falls from his neck and sinks “like lead into the sea.” The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The dead men awaken and the Mariner directs his ghostly crew North. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

As the Mariner returns to his home port, the spirits of his crew leave their bodies. He receives forgiveness (shrieve) from a hermit. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The Mariner’s ship sinks. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:

The story concluded, the wedding guest leaves “a sadder and a wiser man.” The Mariner must tell his tale to warn others (redemption). The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Picture gallery:

Picture gallery

“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge: as illustrated by Gustave Dore in 1878:

“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge : as illustrated by Gustave Dore in 1878

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