FICTION/NON-FICTION: Group 3 Presentations- Ian, Ivy, Yodi - 11K

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Characteristics and Features of a Legend/ Fable Historical Writing/Speech: descriptions based on content, structure, language, genre

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Literary Genres:

Literary Genres Examining Fiction and Non-Fiction Text Types

Legend:

Legend Fiction

Characteristics: Content:

Characteristics: Content Exaggerated characters & events, usually based on reality Usually handed down by tradition Focuses on a place or individuals and their accomplishments/history Fictional story once believed to be true, but turns out to be fictional Symbolic representation of folk belief Usually set in a notable place and time in history.

Language:

Language A form of narrative writing Written in a paragraph form Depicts characters in an epic and exaggerated way S imiles and metaphors R ich, evocative vocabulary

Structure:

Structure Step 1 – The Setting: Describe a happy, healthy village beneath a hill.

Structure:

Structure Step 2 – The Problem is..... A dragon moves into a cave in the hill and begins to eat all the crops and livestock.

Structure:

Structure Step 3 – The failure to solve the problem The villagers try to drive the dragon away – but his fiery breath drives them off and burns the village.

Structure:

Structure Step 4 – Then a hero comes along.... The wise man is called in to help solve the problem.

Structure:

Structure Step 5 – And he has a plan. The wise man has secretly been working on a liquid to put out fires.

Structure:

Structure Step 6 – And the Solution is found! The wise man sneaks a barrel of his fire stopping fluid up to the dragon’s cave. In the morning the dragon comes out and drinks it to save himself flying down to the river. The fire in his belly is put out and the wise man drives off the dragon. He takes the Dragon hoard and uses the treasure to rebuild the village.

Structure:

Structure Step 7 – The Happy Ending The wise man takes the Dragon hoard and uses the treasure to rebuild the village.

Notable Legends:

Notable Legends Robin Hood Ulster Cycle King Arthur Atlantis Shangri-La

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fiction

Content:

Content Story that features animals, plants, mythical creatures, objects, or force of nature which are anthropomorphized I llustrates a moral lesson, which may at the end be expressed explicitly Animals are usually stereotyped; e.g. Sharks and wolves are bad while bunnies are good.

Language:

Language Depends on origin Simple and polite language, usually aimed towards younger audience

Strucrture:

Strucrture Beginning Usually introduces the setting Uses vivid imagery to describe the season, time of day, and the environment

Beginning:

Beginning On one fine summer's day in a field a Grasshopper was hopping about in a musical mood. An ant passed by bearing along with great toil an ear of corn he was taking to the nest.

Structure:

Structure Middle Introduces the characters Lays out the conflict/problem Describe the events happening in the plot

Middle:

Middle The grasshopper invited the ant to sit for a chat with him. But the ant refused saying that "I’m storing up food for winter". " Why don’t you do the same?" asked the ant to the grasshopper. "Pooh! Why bother about winter?" said the Grasshopper; we have got enough food at present." But the Ant went on its way and continued its toil.

Structure:

Structure End Conclusion of conflict Depiction of the moral lesson

End:

End Finally, when winter came, the Grasshopper found itself dying of hunger, while it saw the ants distributing corn and grain from their storage. Then the Grasshopper understood that… It is best to prepare for the days of necessity.

Notable Fables:

Notable Fables Lion King Aesop's Fables by Aesop The Boy Who Cried Wolf The Fable of the Bees by Bernard de Mandeville

Speech:

Speech Non-Fiction

Speech:

Speech First recorded oratorical work is found in Greece over 2000 years ago Ancient Greek orators does so to “make the weaker arguments the stronger one” It used to be a popular source of entertainment in ancient Rome

Speech: Language:

Speech: Language Not too elaborate Use clear and simple words and expressions Do not use offensive words Clearly convey the idea Do not over exaggerate

Speech: Content:

Speech: Content Appropriate, relevant purpose Explicit and influencing theme Mix of several styles, putting the event and audience into consideration Styles: Humor, Narrative, exposition, argument, motivation

Speech: Structure:

Speech: Structure Introduction Get the attention and interest of your audience Establish credibility and goodwill Create desire on the part of the audience to listen; Why should they care? Show the importance of the issue You may use Humor, quotation , rhetorical question , startling statement , etc.

Introduction:

Introduction “Delivering a commencement address is a great responsibility; or so I thought until I cast my mind back to my own graduation. The commencement speaker that day was the distinguished British philosopher Baroness Mary Warnock. Reflecting on her speech has helped me enormously in writing this one, because it turns out that I can’t remember a single word she said. This liberating discovery enables me to proceed without any fear that I might inadvertently influence you to abandon promising careers in business, the law or politics for the giddy delights of becoming a gay wizard.” –J.K Rowling Inaugural speech

Speech: Structure:

Speech: Structure Body Gives your main points Be organized; Problem, cause, solution Always give well explained, logical Ideas. Develop each point completely before going on to the next Summarize the point before making a transition to the next point Use a variety of support

Body:

Body “So why do I talk about the benefits of failure? Simply because failure meant a stripping away of the inessential. I stopped pretending to myself that I was anything other than what I was, and began to direct all my energy into finishing the only work that mattered to me. Had I really succeeded at anything else, I might never have found the determination to succeed in the one arena I believed I truly belonged. And so rock bottom became the solid foundation on which I rebuilt my life.” -J.K. Rowling Inaugural speech

Speech: Structure:

Speech: Structure C onclusion Summarize your ideas Give your hopes and expectation Final words of wisdom Make impact; Use quotations and moralities

Conclusion:

Conclusion “So today, I wish you nothing better than similar friendships. And tomorrow, I hope that even if you remember not a single word of mine, you remember those of Seneca, another of those old Romans I met when I fled down the Classics corridor, in retreat from career ladders, in search of ancient wisdom: As is a tale, so is life: not how long it is, but how good it is, is what matters. I wish you all very good lives.” -J.K. Rowling Inaugural Speech

Famous Speeches:

Famous Speeches I Have A Dream by Martin Luther King Jr. Inaugural Address by John Fitzgerald Kennedy Pearl Harbour Address to the Nation by Franklin Delano Roosevelt The Ballot or the Bullet by Malcolm X

Historical Writing:

Historical Writing Non-Fiction

Content:

Content Strong T hesis Statement and evidence Demonstrate originality and critical thinking Acknowledges that many perspectives are possible on any question Demonstrates the validity of the writer's own view.

Language:

Language No exaggeration P ast tense Avoid l engthy quotations and rhetorical questions Writing in the first person, such as "I think", "in my opinion" should be avoided

Structure:

Structure Introduction Shows thesis statement Introduce your ideas, not describe in detail Include relevant background information Get to the point quickly Explain advanced or ambiguous terms

Introduction:

Introduction In this essay I will be attempting to answer the question of weather Napoleon was an heir to the French Revolution. This will involve me firstly exploring my definition of the term heir, and my views on the explanations and definitions of the French Revolution. Having done this I will then move on to examine the reign of Napoleon. By doing this I hope to prove my view that, whilst Napoleon may be considered an inevitable consequence of the revolution, he was not its heir.

Structure:

Structure Body Systematic development of an argument Discuss 1 major idea per paragraph Prove your arguments Provide factual information to prove your thesis Explain the significance of the evidence that you present

Body:

Body On December 2nd 1804 Napoleon crowned himself emperor of France and this reveals two important things. Firstly it meant that Napoleon was now a single authoritarian leader with absolute power. The ethos of democracy, which had been the founding principles of all the revolutionary forms of government since 1789, had been disregarded completely. This was evident from as early as 1800 when Napoleon’s reforms of local government reduced the role of the electorate to simply producing a list of candidates for the legislation assembly, from which the government would select the members.

Structure:

Structure Conclusion E nd simply and cleanly F ocus on the thesis Restate the thesis

Conclusion:

Conclusion The debate over Napoleon will be one, which can never be resolved. Some will always see him as the revolutions saviour, whilst others will continue to claim he was the predecessor of men like Hitler and Stalin. The political beliefs of the historian, unfortunately, normally dictate which conclusion they come to as regards Napoleon Bonaparte.

“There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book.” ― Frank Serafini:

“There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book.” ― Frank Serafini

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