kashif fianl SHRM

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TITLE PAGE:

2 – 1 TITLE PAGE With a signed declaration that the dissertation is your own work.

ABSTRACT:

2 – 2 ABSTRACT A short overview of the work in your project

TABEL OF CONTENT:

2 – 3 TABEL OF CONTENT a list of page numbers for all major section headings, tables and figures

INTTRODUCTION:

2 – 4 INTTRODUCTION A section explaining the background to the topic, defining your aim for the study and outlining the structure of the dissertation.

LITERATURE REVIEW :

2 – 5 LITERATURE REVIEW referring to key research relevant to your topic (if your topic is popular and a significant amount of research has been conducted on it, try to focus on recent literature mostly; do not refer to very old research as it most likely that it will be out-of-date), pointing out its value as well as possible limitations and indicating how your study is going to add to it.

METHODOLOGY :

2 – 6 METHODOLOGY a section recommending appropriate approaches/methods for carrying out the research and commenting on their advantages and disadvantages. Amongst these, you will have to define the one you are going to use and justify your choice.

Results / Findings:

2 – 7 Results / Findings a section stating your original contributions and outcomes of your research.

Internal Assessment of the Organizational Workforce:

2 – 8 Internal Assessment of the Organizational Workforce Auditing Jobs and Skills What jobs exist now? How many individuals are performing each job? How essential is each job? What jobs will be needed to implement future organizational strategies? What are the characteristics of anticipated jobs?

Internal Assessment of the Organizational Workforce:

2 – 9 Internal Assessment of the Organizational Workforce Organizational Capabilities Inventory HRIS databases —s ources of information about employees’ knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) Components of an organizational capabilities inventory Workforce and individual demographics Individual employee career progression Individual job performance data

Forecasting HR Supply and Demand:

2 – 10 Forecasting HR Supply and Demand Forecasting The use of information from the past and present to identify expected future conditions. Forecasting Methods Judgmental Estimates — asking managers’ opinions, top-down or bottom-up Rules of thumb —using general guidelines Delphi technique — asking a group of experts Nominal groups —reaching a group consensus in open discussion

Forecasting HR Supply and Demand:

2 – 11 Forecasting HR Supply and Demand Forecasting Methods (cont’d) Mathematical Statistical regression analysis — Simulation models Productivity ratios — units produced per employee Staffing ratios — estimates of indirect labor needs Forecasting Periods Short-term —less than one year Intermediate —up to five years Long-range —more than five years

Forecasting Methods:

2 – 12 Forecasting Methods Figure 2 –8

Forecasting HR Supply and Demand:

2 – 13 Forecasting HR Supply and Demand Forecasting the Demand for Human Resources Organization-wide estimate for total demand Unit breakdown for specific skill needs by number and type of employee Develop decision rules (“fill rates”) for positions to be filled internally and externally. Develop additional decision rules for positions impacted by the chain effects of internal promotions and transfers. Forecasting the Supply for Human Resources External Supply Internal Supply

Forecasting HR Supply and Demand:

2 – 14 Forecasting HR Supply and Demand Forecasting External HR Supply Factors affecting external Net migration for an area Individuals entering and leaving the workforce Individuals graduating from schools and colleges Changing workforce composition and patterns Economic forecasts Technological developments and shifts Actions of competing employers Government regulations and pressures Other factors affecting the workforce

Forecasting HR Supply and Demand:

2 – 15 Forecasting HR Supply and Demand Forecasting Internal HR Supply Effects of promotions, lateral moves, and terminations Succession analysis Replacement charts Transition matrix (Markov matrix)

Estimating Internal Labor Supply for a Given Unit:

2 – 16 Estimating Internal Labor Supply for a Given Unit Figure 2 –9

Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage:

2 – 17 Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage Workforce Reductions and the WARN Act Identifies employer requirements for layoff advance notice. 60-day notice to employees and the local community before a layoff or facility closing involving more than 50 people. Does not cover part-time or seasonal workers. Imposes fines for not following notification procedure. Has hardship clauses for unanticipated closures or lack of business continuance capabilities.

Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage:

2 – 18 Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage Workforce Realignment “Downsizing”, “Rightsizing”, and “Reduction in Force” (RIF) all mean reducing the number of employees in an organization. Causes Economic —weak product demand, loss of market share to competitors Structural —technological change, mergers and acquisitions

Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage:

2 – 19 Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage Workforce Realignment (cont’d) Positive consequences Increase competitiveness Increased productivity Negative consequences Cannibalization of HR resources Loss of specialized skills and experience Loss of growth and innovation skills Managing survivors Provide explanations for actions and the future Involve survivors in transition/regrouping activities

Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage:

2 – 20 Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage Downsizing approaches Attrition and hiring freezes Not replacing departing employees and not hiring new employees/ Early retirement buyouts Offering incentives that encourage senior employees to leave the organization early. Layoffs Employees are placed on unpaid leave until called back to work when business conditions improve. Employees are selected for layoff on the basis of their seniority or performance or a combination of both.

Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage:

2 – 21 Managing Human Resource Surplus or Shortage Downsizing approaches (cont’d) Outplacement services provided to displaced employees to give them support and assistance: Personal career counseling Resume preparation and typing services Interviewing workshops Referral assistance Severance payments Continuance of medical benefits Job retraining

Dealing with Downsizing:

2 – 22 Dealing with Downsizing Investigate alternatives to downsizing Involve those people necessary for success in the planning for downsizing Develop comprehensive communications plans Nurture the survivors Outplacement pays off

Assessing HR Effectiveness:

2 – 23 Assessing HR Effectiveness Diagnostic Measures of HR Effectiveness HR expense per employee Compensation as a percent of expenses HR department expense as a percent of total expenses Cost of hires Turnover rates Absenteeism rates Worker’s compensation per employee

Overview of the HR Evaluation Process:

2 – 24 Overview of the HR Evaluation Process Figure 2 –10

Assessing HR Effectiveness:

2 – 25 Assessing HR Effectiveness HR Audit A formal research effort that evaluates the current state of HR management in an organization Audit areas: Legal compliance (e.g., EEO, OSHA, ERISA, and FMLA) Current job specifications and descriptions Valid recruiting and selection process Formal wage and salary system • Benefits Employee handbook Absenteeism and turnover control Grievance resolution process Orientation program • Training and development Performance management system

Using HR Research for Assessment:

2 – 26 Using HR Research for Assessment HR Research The analysis of data from HR records to determine the effectiveness of past and present HR practices. Primary Research Research method in which data are gathered first-hand for the specific project being conducted. Secondary Research Research method using data already gathered by others and reported in books, articles in professional journals, or other sources.

HR Performance and Benchmarking:

2 – 27 HR Performance and Benchmarking Benchmarking Comparing specific measures of performance against data on those measures in other “best practice” organizations Common Benchmarks Total compensation as a percentage of net income before taxes Percent of management positions filled internally Dollar sales per employee Benefits as a percentage of payroll cost

Doing the Benchmarking Analysis:

2 – 28 Doing the Benchmarking Analysis Return on Investment (ROI) Calculation showing the value of expenditures for HR activities. A = Operating costs for a new or enhance system for the time period B = One-time cost of acquisition and implementation C = Value of gains from productivity improvements for the time period

HR Business Performance Calculations:

2 – 29 HR Business Performance Calculations Figure 2 –11a Source: Adapted from Jac Fitz-Enz, “Top 10 Calculations for Your HRIS,” HR Focus , April 1998, S-3.

HR Business Performance Calculations:

2 – 30 HR Business Performance Calculations Figure 2 –11b Source: Adapted from Jac Fitz-Enz, “Top 10 Calculations for Your HRIS,” HR Focus , April 1998, S-3.

Doing the Benchmarking Analysis:

2 – 31 Doing the Benchmarking Analysis Economic Value Added (EVA) A firm’s net operating profit after the cost of capital (minimum rate of return demanded by the shareholders) is deducted. Cost of capital is the benchmark for returns for all HR activities. Utility analysis Analysis in which economic or other statistical models are built to identify the costs and benefits associated with specific HR activities

Human Resource Information Systems:

2 – 32 Human Resource Information Systems Human resource information systems (HRIS) An integrated system of hardware, software, and databases designed to provide information used in HR decision making. Benefits of HRIS Administrative and operational efficiency in compiling HR data Availability of data for effective HR strategic planning Uses of HRIS Automation of payroll and benefit activities EEO/affirmative action tracking

Uses of an HR Information System (HRIS):

2 – 33 Uses of an HR Information System (HRIS) Figure 2 –12

Designing and Implementing an HRIS:

2 – 34 Designing and Implementing an HRIS HRIS Design Issues What information available and what is information needed? To what uses will the information be put? What output format compatibility with other systems is required? Who will be allowed to access to the information? When and how often will the information be needed?

Accessing the HRIS:

2 – 35 Accessing the HRIS Intranet An organizational (internal) network that operates over the Internet. Extranet An Internet-linked network that allows employees access to information provided by external entities. Web-based HRIS Uses Bulletin boards Data access Employee self-service Extended linkage

THANKS:

THANKS BY: M.KASHIF KASHMIRI M.Phil Scholar 2 – 36

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