Welcome Back 2012-2013 - Kathi Shaw

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Welcome Back 2012-2013 - Kathi Shaw

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Teaching and Learning:

Teaching and Learning 2012-2013

The Teaching and Learning Cadre:

The Teaching and Learning Cadre Kathi Shaw – Assistant Principal for Teaching and Learning Jenn Petroshus-Haley – Title 1 Project Specialist Kathryn Gunnels – Literacy Coach Rob Hilliker – Math Coach

Academic Support team:

Academic Support team Alfonso Gonzalez – Liaison Crystal Reedy – Counselor Academic Support Discipline : G-M

The Role of Teaching and Learning:

The Role of Teaching and Learning Provide Support for ALL Teachers Instructional Coaches as support Title 1 Project Specialist as support Professional Development Implementation of the Common Core

PowerPoint Presentation:

PLC’s- 301 Support. Analysis of student work. Rigorous lesson design. Common Formative and Summative Assessments Data Analysis- RTI . ATI. Grades. Common Formative and Summative Assessments Peer Coaching Instructional Rounds Ki: Support Response to Intervention- A ll three Tiers

WHY WHAT WE ARE DOING ISN’T GOING TO PREPARE OUR STUDENTS FOR CAREER AND COLLEGE:

WHY WHAT WE ARE DOING ISN’T GOING TO PREPARE OUR STUDENTS FOR CAREER AND COLLEGE The data speaks for itself.

PowerPoint Presentation:

7/30/2012 7

PowerPoint Presentation:

Grade level Reading Math 6 57 63 7 55 65 8 65 60 High School 55 61 Grades 6-12

PowerPoint Presentation:

Student Chances for Post-Secondary Success in Math and Science based on reading ability. Science Math Below benchmark 1% 15% At benchmark 31% 67%

PowerPoint Presentation:

7/30/2012 10

PowerPoint Presentation:

Text Complexity Grade Bands and Associated Lexile Ranges (Lexiles) Text Complexity Grade Band in the Standards Old Lexile Ranges Lexile Ranges Aligned to CCR Expectations K–1 N/A N/A 2–3 450–725 450–790 4–5 645–845 770–980 6–8 860–1010 955–1155 9–10 960–1115 1080–1305 11–CCR 1070–1220 1215–1355 7/30/2012 11

How well do you have to read for college and careers?:

How well do you have to read for college and careers? Text Collection 50 th percentile Education (11-12 grades) 1130L Workplace 1260L Community College 1295L University 1395L Williamson, G.L. (2008), A Text Readability Continuum for Postsecondary Readiness. Journal of Advanced Academics, 19 (4), 602-632.

A Closer Look…Draw the Lines:

A Closer Look…Draw the Lines 7/30/2012 13

PowerPoint Presentation:

7/30/2012 14

PowerPoint Presentation:

Karin K. Hess, Ed.D., Senior Associate National Center for Assessment, Dove, NH khess@nciea.org 7/30/2012 15

PowerPoint Presentation:

Expectations for Student Performance (Cognitive Demand) Skill/Concept Recall Strategic Thinking Extended Thinking Acquire Use Extend Memorize/Recall Perform Procedures Analyze/ Investigate Evaluate Generate/ Demonstrate English Language Arts & Reading Rigor Increases and Overlaps Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Create 7/30/2012 16

The Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix :

The Hess Cognitive Rigor Matrix 7/30/2012 17 Karin K. Hess, Ed.D., Senior Associate National Center for Assessment, Dove, NH khess@nciea.org Karen Hess-Short Version 2.5 minutes Applying Webb’s Depth-of-Knowledge Levels to Bloom’s Cognitive Process Dimensions-ELA

PowerPoint Presentation:

Vivi’s Five Guidelines for Grading

1. Consistency among teachers:

1. Consistency among teachers “INTERESTING” “ The score a student receives on a test is more dependent on who scores the test and how they score it than it is on what the student knows and understands.” -Marzano, Classroom Assessment & Grading That Work (CAGTW), p. 30

2. Equality of point spread between grades:

2. Equality of point spread between grades Typical 100 pt. scale A = 90-100 B = 80-89 C = 70-79 D = 60-79 F = 0-59 Imagine the reverse A = 40-100 B = 30-39 C = 20-29 D = 10-19 F = 0-9 In the reverse example, that “A” would have a huge, yet undue, inflationary effect on the overall grade. Since we wouldn’t want the “A” to have an inaccurate effect, we do not want the “F” to have an undue, deflationary effect .

3. Eliminate averaging:

3. Eliminate averaging This quarter you taught these concepts and gave a quarter test over them: 4 quadrant graphing Slope and y-intercept Multiplying binomials Ratios/proportions 3-dimensional solids Area and circumference of a circle The following students all received a “B” based on averaging What does this mark tell us about each student’s proficiency with each of the concepts you’ve taught? Student Graphing Slope Binomial Ratios 3-D Solids Area/Cir Total A 2 3 5 5 5 3 23 B 3 5 5 4 5 1 23 C 5 5 5 2 1 5 23

4. Grade Learning, not behavior:

4. Grade Learning, not behavior “When schools improve grading policies-for example, by disconnecting grades from behavior-student achievement increases and behavior improves dramatically.” (Doug Reeves, ASCD’s Educational Leadership, 2008, p. 90, Reeves) “We err gravely when we call compliance and politeness, ‘algebra’ and ‘English,’ or any other label that conflates proficiency with behavior.” Doug Reeves, 2006, as quoted in the 3 rd edition of Ken O’Connor’s How to Grade for Leaning, Corwin Press, 2008)

5. No Zeroes or extra credit:

5. No Zeroes or extra credit A grade represents a valid and undiluted indicator of what a student knows and is able to do—mastery . ZEROES : Work against everyone by diminishing hope Do not accurately measure mastery when averaged against earned scores. (think back to our temperature example) “We are faced with the irony that a policy that may be grounded in the belief of holding students accountable (giving zeroes) actually allows some students to escape accountability for learning.” --O’Connor, p. 86

authorStream Live Help