PRA

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

RAID

Comments

Presentation Transcript

SEMINAR PRESENTATION ON RAID :

SEMINAR PRESENTATION ON RAID Department of Computer Technology Y.C.C.E, NAGPUR

OUTLINE:

OUTLINE Introduction Types of RAID RAID standard level RAID implementation Applications Conclusion References

INTRODUCTION :

INTRODUCTION Redundant Array of Independent Disks [2] - RAID is a great system for increasing speed and availability of data. - Fulfils the needs of multimedia and other data hungry programs. - Provides fault tolerance.

Why Use RAID? :

Why Use RAID? RAID devices can act as a single drive. Allows simultaneous read/write. Overall increase in I/O performance. Provides data redundancy.

History:

History Single large expensive disks (SLED). IBM and Berkeley University, California [3] RAID levels 0-5

Types of RAID:

Types of RAID Software RAID [1] -run on the server’s CPU -directly dependent on server CPU performance and load -occupies host system memory and CPU operation, degrading server performance Hardware RAID [1] -run on the RAID controller’s CPU -does not occupy any host system memory. - true hardware multi-tasking

RAID standard levels[4]:

RAID standard levels [4] RAID 0 RAID 1 RAID 2 RAID 3 RAID 4 RAID 5

RAID 0:

RAID 0 Uses striping I/O performance gain No Data redundancy Not fault tolerant Not considered “true” RAID

Advantages and Disadvantages:

Advantages and Disadvantages Advantages -increased storage performance -no loss in data capacity Disadvantages -no redundancy of data

RAID 1:

RAID 1 Uses mirroring Also known as duplexing Fault tolerant High Disk overhead Mirroring typically handled system software Simplest RAID design

Advantages and Disadvantages:

Advantages and Disadvantages Advantages -provides full redundancy of data Disadvantages -storage capacity is only as large as smalllest drive -no performance increases -some downtime to change active drive during the failure

RAID 2:

RAID 2 Error Detection and Correction Parity and Hamming Code ECC (Error Correction Code)

RAID 3:

RAID 3 Exit Hamming Code, Enter XOR ( e X clusive OR ) XOR in Action: 0101 2 XOR 0011 2 = 0110 2 XOR Logic Table A XOR B R esult 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0

Advantages and Disadvantages:

Advantages and Disadvantages Advantages - High Read/Write Transfer Rates -Disk failures don’t slow the system -Low Ratio of Data Disks to Parity Disks Disadvantages - Transaction rate slowed by Parity Disk -Complex Controller Design -Software Implementation

RAID 4:

RAID 4 Offshoot of RAID 3 No Striping, Entire files written to individual disks Parity Data created on a sector-by-sector basis

Advantages and Disadvantages:

Advantages and Disadvantages Advantages - Very high read rates Disadvantages - Very slow write rates -Inefficient data recovery -Even more Complex Controller Design than RAID 3

RAID 5:

RAID 5 Highest Read data transaction rate Medium Write data transaction rate Most complex controller design Used For Server Applications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Software Outboard DASD Inboard DASD Disk controlers RAID Implementation [6]

Applications [7]:

Applications [7] Image editing. Accounting and Financial Systems . Video production and editing. Any application requiring high bandwidth.

Problems in RAID[5]:

Problems in RAID [5] Co-related failures Write cache reliability Equipment compatibility Recovery time is increasing Hardware labelling issue

Conclusion:

Conclusion Grown more complex Large price range Huge step forward for industry Not for the masses yet

References:

References Yuval, Fledel . Uri, Kanonov . Yuval, Elovici . Shlomi , Dolev . Chanan ,. "Google Android: A Comprehensive Security Assessment". IEEE Security & Privacy (IEEE) (in press). doi:10.1109/MSP.2010.2. ISSN 1540-7993 Howe, Denis, ed. Redundant Arrays of Independent Disks from FOLDOC . Imperial College Department of Computing. http :// foldoc.org /RAID David A. Patterson, Garth Gibson, and Randy H. Katz: A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID). University of California Berkeley. 1988. "SNIA Dictionary". Snia.org. Retrieved 2010-08-24 Disk Failures in the Real World: What Does an MTTF of 1,000,000 Hours Mean to You? Bianca Schroeder and Garth A. Gibson "Using WindowsXP to Make RAID 5 Happen". Tomshardware.com. Retrieved 2010-08-24. www.bestitdocuments.com/Samples/RAID_Technology_Overview.pdf

Thank You!:

Thank You! QUESTIONS??

authorStream Live Help